Gaza–Jericho Agreement

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The Gaza–Jericho Agreement, officially called Agreement on the Gaza Strip and the Jericho Area, of 4 May 1994 was a follow-up treaty to the Oslo I Accord in which details of Palestinian autonomy were concluded. [1] The agreement is commonly known as the 1994 Cairo Agreement.

The Treaty provided for limited Palestinian self-rule in West Bank and Gaza Strip within five years. Pursuant to the Agreement, Israel promised to withdraw partly from Jericho in the West Bank and partly from the Gaza Strip, within three weeks from the date of the signing. The Palestinian Authority was created, of which Yasser Arafat became the first president on 5 July 1994. Other parts of the agreement were the Protocol on Economic Relations (Paris Protocol) and the establishment of the Palestinian Civil Police Force. The Paris Protocol regulates the economic relationship between Israel and the Palestinian Authority, but in effect integrates the Palestinian economy into the Israeli one.[2]

This agreement was incorporated into and superseded by the Oslo II Accord, formally known as the Interim Agreement on the West Bank and the Gaza Strip of 24 and 28 September 1995.[3]

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