George McAneny

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George Francis McAneny
George McAneny.jpg
George McAneny in 1910
President of the Borough of Manhattan
In office
1910–1913
Preceded by John Cloughen
Succeeded by Marcus M. Marks
Constituency Borough of Manhattan (New York City)
President of the New York City Board of Aldermen
In office
1914–1916
Preceded by Ardolph Loges Kline
Succeeded by Frank L. Dowling
Constituency City of New York
New York City Comptroller
In office
1933–1933
Preceded by Charles W. Berry
Succeeded by Arthur Cunningham
Constituency City of New York
Personal details
Born December 24, 1869 (1869-12-24)
Jersey City, New Jersey
Died July 29, 1953 (1953-07-30)
Princeton, New Jersey
Political party Democratic
Alma mater Hobart College law school, Geneva, New York
Profession newspaperman, public official

George Francis McAneny (December 24, 1869 – July 29, 1953), a newspaperman and municipal reformer, was Manhattan Borough President from 1910 to 1913, President of the New York City Board of Aldermen from 1914 to 1916, and New York City Comptroller in 1933. He also served as executive secretary of the New York City Civil Service Commission, secretary of the New York Civil Service Reform League (1894-1902), and executive manager of The New York Times (1916-1921).[1]

Biography[edit]

McAneny was born on Christmas Eve, 1869, in Greenville, New Jersey, graduated from Jersey City High School and then reported for The New York World, supporting civil service, city planning and a Bureau of Municipal Research. At different times he was executive secretary of the New York Civil Service Commission and secretary of the New York Civil Service Reform League (1894–1902).[2]

While president of the City Club of New York from 1906 to 1909, he served on the city's charter review commission (1908). He was elected on fusion tickets as Manhattan Borough President in 1909 and as President of the New York City Board of Aldermen in 1913, serving from that position for several months as acting mayor in place of John Purroy Mitchel.

From 1916 to 1921 he was the executive manager of The New York Times and from 1921 to 1926, he chaired the New York State Transit Commission. In 1933, he served briefly as New York City Comptroller before becoming President of the Title Guarantee and Trust Company (1934–1936). After 1920, McAneny was active in many other fields of interest, including city and regional planning (as the first President of the Regional Plan Association from 1930 until his death), sanitation (at one point as the City's Commissioner of Sanitation), landmarks preservation, and preparing the 1939 New York World's Fair as chairman of the World's Fair Commission, 1935–1936.[3][4][5]

He died in Princeton, New Jersey on July 29, 1953.[1][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Howard Elkinton (August 15, 1953). "Tribute to George McAneny; Record of His Accomplishments in Public Service Is Memorialized". New York Times. Retrieved 2012-09-11. 
  2. ^ "George McAneny Addresses the League for Political Education on the Prospects of Reform". New York Times. December 5, 1897. Retrieved 2012-09-11. "George McAneny, Secretary of the Civil Service Reform Association, made an address yesterday before the League for Political Education" 
  3. ^ a b Jessica Marati (2008), "George McAneny". Mudd Manuscript Library of the Princeton University Library. Retrieved March 20, 2011. "George McAneny was a prominent New York City civil servant. Born in 1869 in Greenville, New Jersey, McAneny attended Jersey City High School and began a career in journalism after graduation. He eventually switched gears to the public sphere and served as Executive Secretary of the New York Civil Service Commission, Secretary of the New York Civil Service Reform League, President of the City Club, President of the Borough of Manhattan, President of the Board of Aldermen. McAneny was also an executive manager of the New York Times. He died in 1953." 
  4. ^ Jackson, Kenneth T., ed. (1995). The Encyclopedia of New York City. New Haven: Yale University Press. ISBN 0300055366. , articles on "Comptroller" (page 270) and "George McAneny" (by Richard Skolnick, page 703).
  5. ^ "George McAneny" in the New York Preservation Archive Project, retrieved March 5, 2012

External links[edit]

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