HOAP

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The HOAP series robots are an advanced humanoid robot platform manufactured by Fujitsu Automation[1] in Japan. HOAP is an abbreviation for "Humanoid for Open Architecture Platform".

The HOAP series should not be confused with the HRP series (also known as Promet).

History[edit]

In 2001, Fujitsu realized its first commercial humanoid robot named HOAP-1. The HOAP-2 was released in 2003 followed by the HOAP-3[2] in 2005.

Specifications of HOAP-2[edit]

  • Height: 1 ft 7 in (48 cm)[3]
  • Weight: 15 lb (6.8 kg)[3]
  • HOAP-2 system consists of the robot body, PC and power supplies.
  • The PC OS uses RT-Linux (open C/C++language)
  • Smooth movement became realized because the electric current control of motor was possible(except neck and hand).
  • USB interface for the internal LAN makes modification or addition of new actuators and sensors easily accomplished.
  • The neck, waist and hands now have movement capability. Smooth movement can be realized now.
  • Easy to program and simple initial start up using sample program, included with Robot purchase.

Capabilities of HOAP-2[edit]

HOAP-2 has been demonstrated with capabilities to successfully perform the following tasks, among others:

  • walking on flat terrain [4]
  • performing sumo movements[5]
  • cleaning a whiteboard[6][7]
  • following a ball[8]
  • grasping thin objects, such as pens, brushes, etc.

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1][dead link]
  2. ^ "Miniature Hunamoid Rrobot HOAP-3". Fujitsu. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  3. ^ a b [2][dead link]
  4. ^ "http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZYaW9_haiU". HOAP-2 learns to walk through imitation video on YouTube. Retrieved 2011-03-19. 
  5. ^ "http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j1sQ9ZK3l9w". HOAP-2 performs sumo movements video on YouTube. Retrieved 2011-03-19. 
  6. ^ Kormushev, Petar; Nenchev D.N.; Calinon S.; Caldwell D.G. "Upper-body Kinesthetic Teaching of a Free-standing Humanoid Robot". IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA 2011). Retrieved 2011-03-19. 
  7. ^ "http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVH1E5gGLf8". HOAP-2 robot learns to clean a whiteboard video on YouTube. Retrieved 2011-03-19. 
  8. ^ "http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPYjXQHv2Gs". HOAP-2 follows a ball video on YouTube. Retrieved 2011-03-19. 

External links[edit]