Hot yoga

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Hot yoga refers to yoga exercises performed under hot and humid conditions. Often associated with the style devised by Bikram Choudhury, hot yoga is now used to describe any number of yoga styles that use heat to increase an individual's flexibility in the poses.[1][2][3] In colder climates, hot yoga often seeks to replicate the heat and humidity of India where yoga originated.[4] Some forms of hot yoga include:

  • Bikram Yoga was brought to the U.S. in the early 70s and became the most widely known form of hot yoga.
  • Evolation Yoga was founded in 2009 by Mark Drost and Zefea Samson. Zefea has been on the yoga path since the age of 5 and competed in the top 10 at the International Yoga Asana championships for 4 years. They created evolation to provide a comprehensive inclusive and intimate training experience for students who wanted to study the hot yoga Primary Series, without the associated attachments. In 2012, Evolation yoga was unsuccessfully sued by Bikram for copyright infringement. They proved in that case that there is no copyright on the Primary Series.[5][6]
  • Forrest Yoga combines yoga asana with Native American spirituality to create as a "yoga sweat lodge" in a heated room.[3][7]
  • Power Yoga is derived from Ashtanga Vinyasa Yoga and uses heat to replicate environmental conditions in Mysore.[8]
  • TriBalance Yoga another form of hot yoga, performed in slightly warmer but less humid conditions than Bikram Yoga.[9]
  • Moksha Yoga founded in 2004 by Jessica Robertson, Ted Grand, and Natalia Brajak in Canada. This style of yoga is performed in a room heated to approximately 100 degrees and follows a series of 40 asanas, though teachers are free and encouraged to bring their own unique knowledge and experience to their class.[10][11]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Different Types of Yoga Today". Discover Yoga Online. Retrieved 21 November 2011. 
  2. ^ "Hot Yoga". ABC of Yoga. Retrieved 21 November 2011. 
  3. ^ a b "Koreans are crazy about Hot Yoga". Korea Health and Body. Retrieved 21 November 2011. 
  4. ^ Clark, DPT, Danielle. "What is the Real Buzz behind Hot Yoga and Bikram Yoga?". Boston Sports Medicine. Retrieved 21 November 2011. 
  5. ^ Bloomberg "Yoga, AstraZeneca, Intel, UN: Intellectual Property" http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-12-17/yoga-astrazeneca-intel-un-intellectual-property.html
  6. ^ BIKRAM’S YOGA COLLEGE OF INDIA, L.P.; BIKRAM CHOUDHURY, v. EVOLATION YOGA, LLC; MARK DROST; ZEFEA SAMSON; and DOES 1 through 10 (UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT CENTRAL DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA 2012) (“As such, we hold it unconstitutional.”). Text
  7. ^ "About Ana T. Forrest". Mossy Knolls. Retrieved 21 November 2011. 
  8. ^ "Ashtanga yoga, Power Yoga or Ashtanga vinyasa yoga". Holistic Online. Retrieved 21 November 2011. 
  9. ^ "Hot Yoga – How Hot Is It?". Namaste Yogacharya. Retrieved 21 November 2011. 
  10. ^ http://www.livestrong.com/article/373920-moksha-yoga-poses/
  11. ^ http://mokshayoga.ca/home/