Ian R. MacLeod

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Not to be confused with Iain Macleod, the British politician.

Ian R. MacLeod (born 1956) is a British science fiction and fantasy writer.

He was born in Solihull near Birmingham. He studied law and worked as a civil servant before going freelance in early 1990s soon after he started publishing stories, attracting critical praise and awards nominations.

Writings[edit]

He is the author of the novels The Light Ages and The House of Storms, which are set in an alternate universe nineteenth century England, where aether, a substance that can be controlled by the mind, has ossified English society into guilds and has retarded technological progress.

MacLeod's debut novel, The Great Wheel, was published in 1997, and won the Locus Award for Best First novel.

MacLeod's novella The Summer Isles (Asimov's Science Fiction Oct/Nov 1998) won the Sidewise Award for Alternate History, Short Form and the World Fantasy Award for Best Novella.[1] It is an alternate history where Britain, having been defeated in the World War I, develops its own form of fascism in 1930s. The narrator is a closeted homosexual Oxford historian who had known the leader in youth. It was written as a novel, which however could not sell; MacLeod published the cut version, with the full-length version only being published in a limited edition in 2005. This novel version also won the Sidewise Award for Alternate History, Long Form, thus becoming the only story to win the same award twice in two differing formats, novel and novella.

MacLeod won the World Fantasy Award again in for his 2000 novelette The Chop Girl.[2] His shorter fiction has been collected in Voyages by Starlight, Breathmoss and Other Exhalations and Past Magic.

MacLeod was Guest of Honour at the 38th Novacon, held in November 2008.

Bibliography[edit]

Novels[edit]

Short story collections[edit]

  • Voyages by Starlight (1996, Arkham House)
  • Breathmoss and Other Exhalations (2004, Golden Gryphon Press)
  • Past Magic (2006, PS Publishing)
  • Journeys (2010, Subterranean Press)

References[edit]

  1. ^ World Fantasy Convention (2010). "“Award Winners and Nominees”". Retrieved 4 February 2011. 
  2. ^ World Fantasy Convention (2010). "“Award Winners and Nominees”". Retrieved 4 February 2011. 

External links[edit]

Interviews[edit]