In Concert (Miles Davis album)

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In Concert
Live album by Miles Davis
Released May 1973
Recorded September 29, 1972; Philharmonic Hall, New York City
Genre Jazz-funk,[1] jazz-rock[2]
Length 84:06
Label Columbia
Producer Teo Macero
Miles Davis chronology
Black Beauty: Live at the Fillmore West
(1973)
In Concert
(1973)
Jazz at the Plaza
(1973)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4/5 stars[2]
Robert Christgau A–[3]
Down Beat 4/5 stars[4]
Encyclopedia of Popular Music 4/5 stars[5]
Entertainment Weekly A[6]
Los Angeles Times 2/4 stars[7]
The Rolling Stone Album Guide 3.5/5 stars[8]

In Concert[nb 1] is a live double album by American jazz musician Miles Davis. It was recorded at the Philharmonic Hall in New York City. Columbia Records' original release did not credit any personnel, recording date, or track listing, apart from the inner liner listing the two titles "Foot Fooler" and "Slickaphonics".[9]

Critical reception[edit]

In a contemporary review of the album, Bob Palmer of Rolling Stone magazine wrote that, although Carlos Garnett's saxophone playing is marginalized, the music is "bracing, popping, at least one step ahead of the many Davis imitators. There are few real surprises, but there's a continuing skein of rhythms, themes and developments that makes fine extended listening."[12] In a 1981 review, Robert Christgau gave In Concert an "A–" and said that, although "it takes a while to get into gear" and is "pretty narrow in function", its "urban voodoo" has "more going for it rhythmically than On the Corner."[13] In an article for The Village Voice, Christgau wrote of the album upon its reissue in 1997:

By In Concert ... [Michael] Henderson is the sole survivor from the more talented prior band—although, crucially, Al Foster pushes like [Jack] DeJohnette with less excess motion. The result is the purest jazz-funk record ever—not as quick or tricky as James Brown, but more richly layered, riffs and drones and wah-wahs and tunelets and weird noises and shifting key centers snaking along on a sexually solicitous, subtly indomitable pulse.[1]

According to Allmusic editor Steve Huey, "melody isn't the point of this music; it's about power, rhythm, and the sum energy of the collective, and of Davis' electric jazz-rock albums, In Concert does one of the most mind-bending jobs of living up to those ideals".[2] Erik Davis, writing in Spin magazine, praised its "rhythmic wall of sound" and said that its music is "of such propulsive psychedelic density that it makes the heaviest P-Funk sound like the Archies."[14] JazzTimes writer Tom Terrell called Davis "a spiritual Hendrix with his own cosmic band of gypsies", and commented that the album's "visionary performance ... predicts hip hop ('Rated X''s bassline = 'White Lines'), Ornette's Prime Time ('Black Satin') and Talking Heads ('Ife')".[15]

In a mixed review, Don Heckman of the Los Angeles Times criticized Davis' use of the wah-wah effects controller and said that he was "not in particularly exceptional form" because he had "moved more deeply into pounding funk rhythms and fairly static sound textures."[7] In The Rolling Stone Album Guide (2004), J. D. Considine felt that, although it was "occasionally fascinating, the busily churning rhythms often seem oddly static, as if the band were laboriously treading water."[16]

Track listing[edit]

Original LP[edit]

All tracks were composed by Miles Davis.

Record one ("Foot Fooler")
  1. "Miles Davis in Concert" – 20:45
  2. "Miles Davis in Concert" – 25:23
Record two ("Slickaphonics")
  1. "Miles Davis in Concert" – 18:12
  2. "Miles Davis in Concert" – 20:21

CD reissue[edit]

Disc 1: "FOOT FOOLER" IN CONCERT, PARTS 1 & 2

Track
Song Title
Length
1. Rated X
12:16
2. Honky Tonk
9:18
3. Theme from Jack Johnson
10:12
4. Black Satin/The Theme
14:14

Disc 2: "SLICKAPHONICS" IN CONCERT, PARTS 3 & 4:

Track
Song Title
Length
1. Ife
27:53
2. Right Off/The Theme
10:30

Personnel[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Christgau, Robert (October 14, 1997). "Miles Davis's '70s: The Excitement! The Terror!". The Village Voice (New York). Retrieved April 16, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c Huey, Steve (November 1, 2002). Review: In Concert: Live at Philharmonic Hall. Allmusic. Retrieved on 2011-02-26.
  3. ^ Christgau, p. 102.
  4. ^ "Review: In Concert". Down Beat (Chicago): 65. July 1997. 
  5. ^ Larkin 2006, p. 210.
  6. ^ Sinclair, Tom (August 1, 1997). "Miles Davis". Entertainment Weekly (New York) (390): 75. Retrieved June 9, 2013. 
  7. ^ a b Heckman, Don (July 27, 1997). "Unleashing More of the Davis Legacy : MILES DAVIS". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved June 5, 2013. 
  8. ^ Considine et al. 2004, p. 215.
  9. ^ a b "Top Album Picks". Billboard: 60. May 5, 1973. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Miles Davis – In Concert – Columbia KG 32092". Coda 11 (7–12): 105. 1974. 
  11. ^ Schwann Record & Tape Guide 26 (2): 232. 1973. 
  12. ^ Palmer, Bob (June 21, 1973). "In Concert: Live At Philharmonic Hall". Rolling Stone (New York). Retrieved June 9, 2013. 
  13. ^ Christgau 1981, p. 102.
  14. ^ Davis, Erik (August 1997). "Freakin' the Funk – Revisiting Miles Davis's '70s Visions". Spin (New York): 117. Retrieved May 20, 2013. 
  15. ^ Terrell, Tom (October 1997). Review: In Concert: Live at Philharmonic Hall. JazzTimes. Retrieved on 2011-02-26.
  16. ^ Considine et al. 2004, p. 219.
Footnote
  1. ^ The title of the album's original release (Columbia KG 32092) is listed as "In Concert" by Billboard,[9] Coda,[10] and the Schwann Record & Tape Guide.[11]

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]