Lyle R. Wheeler

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Lyle Wheeler)
Jump to: navigation, search
Lyle Wheeler
Born (1905-02-02)February 2, 1905
Woburn, Massachusetts, USA
Died January 10, 1990(1990-01-10) (aged 84)
Woodland Hills, California
Occupation Art director
Years active 1936–1978
Spouse(s)
  • Frances Walther
    (married 1925–1947)
  • Kay Nelson
    (married 1949–?)
  • Donna G. Wheeler
    (married 1954–1987)

Lyle Reynolds Wheeler (February 2, 1905 – January 10, 1990) was an American motion picture art director. He received five Academy Awards — for Gone with the Wind (1939), Anna and the King of Siam (1946), The Robe (1953), The King and I (1956) and The Diary of Anne Frank (1959).

Biography[edit]

Lyle Wheeler studied at the University of Southern California, then worked as a magazine artist and industrial designer. In 1936 he was hired by David O. Selznick to work as a set designer for Selznick's motion picture production company. Wheeler proved to be a creative genius when it came to designing quality sets at reasonable costs and was very much in demand in the industry. By the end of World War II, Wheeler had joined Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, where he remained as chief art director until the end of the 1950s.

In a career spanning 40 years, Wheeler created sets for more than 350 motion pictures, many of which are considered film classics. His credits include A Star is Born, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, State Fair, The Dolly Sisters, Forever Amber, The Fan, The Pride of St. Louis, The Seven Year Itch, and Carousel and in particular, Gone With the Wind, for which he drew some of the earliest examples of storyboards for film, illustrating not only the art design, but the framing, composition and even the color for nearly every shot in the film, greatly influencing the production. He also created matte paintings for all the ceilings for the sets as well as large set pieces like the facade of Tara. He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Art Direction 29 times, winning five. In 1951, he was nominated for four different films, three in 1952 and twice for two films in one year.

His television credits include the long-running CBS series, Perry Mason.[1]

Late in life, Wheeler suffered financial reverses and was forced to sell his home. He lost his five Academy Award statuettes when he was unable to pay a bill in excess of $30,000 at a storage facility. His 1959 Oscar for The Diary of Anne Frank was purchased and returned to Wheeler in 1989 by a fan.[2][1]

Lyle Wheeler died January 10, 1990, at the Motion Picture & Television Country House and Hospital, of pneumonia.[3] He was cremated, and his ashes stored in the vault at the Chapel of the Pines Crematory in Los Angeles.

Academy Awards[edit]

The art direction of Lyle Wheeler was often recognized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.[4]

Wins[edit]

  1. 1939: Gone with the Wind
  2. 1946: Anna and the King of Siam
  3. 1953: The Robe
  4. 1956: The King and I
  5. 1959: The Diary of Anne Frank

Nominations[edit]

  1. 1937: The Prisoner of Zenda
  2. 1938: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
  3. 1940: Rebecca
  4. 1944: Laura
  5. 1945: Leave Her to Heaven
  6. 1947: The Foxes of Harrow
  7. 1949: Come to the Stable
  8. 1950: All About Eve
  9. 1951: Fourteen Hours, House on Telegraph Hill, David and Bathsheba, On the Riviera
  10. 1952: My Cousin Rachel, Viva Zapata!, The Snows of Kilimanjaro
  11. 1953: The President's Lady, Titanic
  12. 1954: Desirée
  13. 1955: Daddy Long Legs, Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing
  14. 1956: Teenage Rebel
  15. 1958: A Certain Smile
  16. 1959: Journey to the Center of the Earth
  17. 1963: The Cardinal

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Folkart, Burt A. (January 12, 1990). "Lyle Wheeler, Who Won 5 Oscars for Art Direction, Dies at 84". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2015-04-25. 
  2. ^ "Lyle Wheeler, 84; Art Director Won 5 Academy Awards". The New York Times. January 13, 1990. Retrieved 2015-04-25. 
  3. ^ McDarrah, Timothy (March 14, 1990). "Oscar Comes Home". Milwaukee Journal (Los Angeles Daily News). Retrieved 2015-04-25. 
  4. ^ "Academy Awards Database". Oscars. Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 2015-04-25. 

External links[edit]