Marcus Valerius Messalla Barbatus

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Marcus Valerius Messalla Barbatus[1][2] also known as Messalla Barbatus[3] (11 BC - 20/21) was a Roman Senator and consul[4] that was a temporary to the reign of the Roman emperor Tiberius who ruled from 14 until 37.

Barbatus by birth was of the gens, Claudius and by adoption belonged to the gens, Valerius. His father was the Roman consul Marcus Valerius Messalla Appianus,[5] may have been the son of the consul of 38 BC, Appius Claudius Pulcher[6] by an unnamed wife. He was probably adopted by Marcus Valerius Messalla, the suffect consul of 32 BC.[7] His mother was Claudia Marcella Minor, who was one of the daughters of Octavia the Younger the sister of Roman emperor Augustus, by her first husband, the consul Gaius Claudius Marcellus.[8] His sister was Claudia Pulchra,[9] who married the Roman general and politician Publius Quinctilius Varus. He was born and raised in Rome.

Barbatus married Domitia Lepida the Younger,[10] who was his maternal cousin.[11] Barbatus and Lepida married probably around 15.[12] Lepida bore Barbatus a possible son, called Marcus Valerius Messalla Corvinus and a daughter called Valeria Messalina,[13] who was a Roman empress and wife of the Roman emperor Claudius.[14] Barbatus left Lepida as a widow,[15] as he most probably died in 20 or early 21 sometime after Messalina was born.

Little is known on his political career, except he served as a consul in 20 with Marcus Aurelius Cotta Maximus Messalinus.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Freisenbruch, Caesar’s Wives: Sex, Power, and Politics in the Roman Empire, p.xxv
  2. ^ Biographischer Index der Antike, p.979
  3. ^ Lightman, A to Z of Ancient Greek and Roman Women, p.205
  4. ^ Biographischer Index der Antike, p.979
  5. ^ Lightman, A to Z of Ancient Greek and Roman Women, p.205
  6. ^ Syme, The Augustan Aristocracy, p. 147
  7. ^ Syme, The Augustan Aristocracy, p. 147
  8. ^ Lightman, A to Z of Ancient Greek and Roman Women, p.p.204-5
  9. ^ Lightman, A to Z of Ancient Greek and Roman Women, p.205
  10. ^ Lightman, A to Z of Ancient Greek and Roman Women, p.105
  11. ^ Klebs, Prosopographia Imperii Romani
  12. ^ Barrett, Agrippina: Sex, Power and Politics in the Early Roman Empire, p.287
  13. ^ Lightman, A to Z of Ancient Greek and Roman Women, p.105
  14. ^ Lightman, A to Z of Ancient Greek and Roman Women, p.205
  15. ^ Lightman, A to Z of Ancient Greek and Roman Women, p.105
  16. ^ Tacitus, Annals 3 2

Sources[edit]

  • A. Freisenbruch, Caesar’s Wives: Sex, Power, and Politics in the Roman Empire, Simon and Schuster, 2011
  • M. Lightman & B. Lightman, A to Z of Ancient Greek and Roman Women, Infobase Publishing, 2008
  • Biographischer Index der Antike (Google eBook), Walter de Gruyter, 2001
  • A.A. Barrett, Agrippina: Sex, Power and Politics in the Early Roman Empire, Yale University Press, 1996
  • R. Syme, The Augustan Aristocracy, Oxford University Press, 1989
  • E. Klebs, H. Dessau & P. Von Rohden, Prosopographia Imperii Romani – Vol.3, Berlin, 1897-1898 (PIR V 88)

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Marcus Junius Silanus Torquatus and Lucius Norbanus Balbus
Consul of the Roman Empire together with Marcus Aurelius Cotta Maximus Messalinus
20
Succeeded by
Tiberius and Drusus Julius Caesar