Minuscule 630

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For other uses, see Codex Ottobonianus.
New Testament manuscripts
papyriuncialsminusculeslectionaries
Minuscule 630
Name Ottobonianus gr. 325
Text Acts of the Apostles, Catholic epistles, and Pauline epistles
Date 12th/13th century
Script Greek
Now at Vatican Library
Size 19.3 cm by 12.6 cm
Type mixed
Category III

Minuscule 630 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), α 461 (von Soden),[1] is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on paper. It is known as Codex Ottobonianus. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 12th or 13th century. The manuscript is lacunose.[2] Formerly it was labeled by 163a and 201p.[3]

Description[edit]

The codex contains the text of the Acts of the Apostles, Catholic epistles, and Pauline epistles, on 215 paper leaves (size 19.3 cm by 12.6 cm), with lacunae (Acts 4:19-5:1). The text is written in one column per page, 26 lines per page.[2] It contains Prolegomena, tables of the κεφαλαια (tables of contents) before each book, and subscriptions at the end of each book.[4][3]

The order of books: Acts of the Apostles, Catholic epistles, and Pauline epistles. Epistle to the Hebrews is placed after Epistle to Philemon.[4]

Text[edit]

The Greek text of the codex is a mixture of the text-types. Kurt Aland placed it in Category III.[5] Aland gave for it the following textual profile: Acts 451 241/2 182 10S; Cath 471 71/2 352 14S; Paul 1711 441/2 282 10S.[5]

Textual variants

In Acts 16:10 it reads θεος along with P74, Sinaiticus, Alexandrinus, Vaticanus, Ephraemi, E, 044, 33, 81, 181, 326, 945, 1739, ar, e, l, vg, copbo, geo; other reading κυριος, is supported by D, P, 049, 056, 0142, 88, 104, 330, 436, 451, 614, 629, 1241, 1505, 1877, 2127, 2412, 2492, 2495, Byz, c, d, gig, syrp,h, copsa.[6]

In Romans 8:1 it reads Ιησου κατα σαρκα περιπατουσιν αλλα κατα πνευμα, for Ιησου. The reading of the manuscript is supported by אc, Dc, K, P, 33, 88, 104, 181, 326, 330, (436 omit μη), 456, 614, 1241, 1877, 1962, 1984, 1985, 2492, 2495, Byz, Lect.[7]

In 1 Corinthians 7:5 it reads τη προσευχη (prayer) along with \mathfrak{P}11, \mathfrak{P}46, א*, A, B, C, D, F, G, P, Ψ, 6, 33, 81, 104, 181, 629, 1739, 1877, 1881, 1962, it, vg, cop, arm, eth. Other manuscripts read τη νηστεια και τη προσευχη (fasting and prayer) or τη προσευχη και νηστεια (prayer and fasting).[8][9]

In 1 Corinthians 15:47 it has singular reading δευτερος ο κυριος for δευτερος ανθρωπος (א*, B, C, D, F, G, 0243, 33, 1739, it, vg, copbo eth) or δευτερος ανθρωπος ο κυριος (אc, A, Dc, K, P, Ψ, 81, 104, 181, 326, 330, 436, 451, 614, 629, 1241, 1739mg, 1877, 1881, 1984, 1985, 2127, 2492, 2495, Byz, Lect).[10]

In 2 Corinthians 2:10 it reads τηλικουτων θανατων, along with p46, 1739c, itd,e, syrp,h, goth; other manuscripts read τηλικουτου θανατου or τηλικουτου κινδυνου.[11]

In 2 Corinthians 11:14 it has reading ου θαυμα as codices Sinaiticus, Vaticanus, Bezae, Augiensis, Boernerianus, Porphyrianus, 098, Uncial 0243, Minuscule 6, 33, 81, 326, 365, 1175, 1739, 1881, 2464; the majority has reading ου θαυμαστον (D2, Ψ, 0121a, Byz).[12]

In 1 Timothy 3:16 it has textual variant θεός ἐφανερώθη (God manifested) (Sinaiticuse, A2, C2, Dc, K, L, P, Ψ, 81, 104, 181, 326, 330, 436, 451, 614, 629, 1241, 1739, 1877, 1881, 1962, 1984, 1985, 2492, 2495, Byz, Lect), against ὃς ἐφανερώθη (he was manifested) supported by Sinaiticus, Codex Alexandrinus, Ephraemi, Boernerianus, 33, 365, 442, 2127, 599.[13][14]

In Hebrews 8:11 it reads πλησιον for πολιτην — P, 81, 104, 436, 629, and 1985.[15]

History[edit]

F. H. A. Scrivener and C. R. Gregory dated the manuscript to the 14th century.[3][4][2] Actually it is dated by the INTF to the 12th or 13th century.[16]

The manuscript was added to the list of New Testament manuscripts by Johann Martin Augustin Scholz, who slightly examined a major part of the manuscript.[17] It was examined and described by Giuseppe Cozza-Luzi.[18] C. R. Gregory saw the manuscript in 1886.[4]

Formerly it was labeled by 163a and 201p. In 1908 Gregory gave the number 630 to it.[1]

It was examined and described by Ernesto Feron and Fabiano Battaglini.[19]

The manuscript is cited by critical editions of the Greek New Testament: NA26, NA27, and UBS3.

The manuscript currently is housed at the Vatican Library (Ottob. gr. 325), at Rome.[2][16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gregory, Caspar René (1908). Die griechischen Handschriften des Neuen Testament. Leipzig: J. C. Hinrichs'sche Buchhandlung. p. 70. 
  2. ^ a b c d K. Aland, M. Welte, B. Köster, K. Junack, "Kurzgefasste Liste der griechischen Handschriften des Neues Testaments", Walter de Gruyter, Berlin, New York 1994, p. 84.
  3. ^ a b c Scrivener, Frederick Henry Ambrose; Edward Miller (1894). A Plain Introduction to the Criticism of the New Testament, vol. 1 (4 ed.). London: George Bell & Sons. p. 296. 
  4. ^ a b c d Gregory, Caspar René (1900). Textkritik des Neuen Testaments 1. Leipzig: Hinrichs. p. 278. 
  5. ^ a b Aland, Kurt; Aland, Barbara (1995). The Text of the New Testament: An Introduction to the Critical Editions and to the Theory and Practice of Modern Textual Criticism. Erroll F. Rhodes (trans.). Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. p. 133. ISBN 978-0-8028-4098-1. 
  6. ^ NA26, p. 480
  7. ^ UBS3, p. 548.
  8. ^ NA26, p. 450.
  9. ^ UBS3, p. 591.
  10. ^ UBS3, p. 616.
  11. ^ UBS3, p. 622.
  12. ^ NA26, p. 488
  13. ^ Bruce M. Metzger, A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament (Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft: Stuttgart 2001), pp. 573-573.
  14. ^ 1 Timothy 3:16 in Codex Alexandrinus at the Bible Research
  15. ^ UBS3, pp. 761-762.
  16. ^ a b "Liste Handschriften". Münster: Institute for New Testament Textual Research. Retrieved 23 January 2011. 
  17. ^ J. M. A. Scholz, Biblisch-kritische Reise in Frankreich, der Schweiz, Italien, Palästine und im Archipel in den Jahren 1818, 1819, 1820, 1821: Nebst einer Geschichte des Textes des Neuen Testaments (Leipzig, 1823)
  18. ^ Cozza-Luzi, Giuseppe (1893). Codices manuscripti graeci ottoboniani Bibliothecae Vaticanae descripti praeside Alphonso cardinali Capecelatro archiepiscopo Capuano. London: Ex Typographeo Vaticano. p. 172. 
  19. ^ Ernesto Feron; Fabiano Battaglini (1893). Codices manuscripti Graeci Ottoboniani bibliothecae Vaticanae 2. Rome. p. 172. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Thomas C. Geer, Family 1739 in Acts (Society of Biblical Literature Monograph Series, 1994)

External links[edit]