Minuscule 181

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New Testament manuscripts
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Minuscule 181
Name Cod. Francisci Xavier
Text New Testament (except Gospels)
Date 11th century
Script Greek
Now at Vatican Library
Size 25 cm by 19.1 cm
Type mixed/Western/Byzantine
Category III/V
Note marginalia

Minuscule 181 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), α 101 (Soden),[1] is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 11th century.[2]

Formerly it was labelled by 40a, 46p, and 12r.[3] It has marginalia.

Description[edit]

The codex contains the text of the Acts of the Apostles, Catholic epistles, Pauline epistles and Book of Revelation with only one lacunae (Titus 3:3 – Philemon), on 169 elegant parchment leaves (size 25 cm by 19.1 cm).[2][3] The text is written in one column per page, in 26-32 lines per page.[2]

The text is divided according to the κεφαλαια (chapters), whose numbers are given at the margin, and their τιτλοι (titles of chapters) at the top of the pages.[3]

It contains Prolegomena, lectionary markings at the margin (for liturgical reading), subscriptions at the end of each book, with numbers of στιχοι, Menologion, and the Euthalian Apparatus.[4] Book of Apocalypse was added in the 15th century.[3]

Text[edit]

The Greek text of the codex is a mixture of text-types in Acts and Catholic epistles.[5] The Text of the Pauline epistles is a representative of the Western text-type.[5] The text of the Apocalypse is a representative of the Byzantine. Aland placed it in Category V. The text of the rest of book Aland placed in Category III.[6]

In Acts 7:18 it reads Εγυπτον for Αιγυπτον.[7]

In Acts 12:25 it reads απο Ιερουσαλημ (from Jerusalem) along with D, Ψ, 436, 614, 2412, 147, 809, 1021, 1141, 1364, 1439, ar, d, gig, vg, Chrysostom; majority reads εις Ιερουσαλημ (to Jerusalem);[8]

In Acts 16:10 it reads θεος along with P74, Sinaiticus, Alexandrinus, Vaticanus, Ephraemi, E, 044, 33, 81, 326, 630, 945, 1739, ar, e, l, vg, copbo, geo; other reading κυριος, is supported by D, P, 049, 056, 0142, 88, 104, 330, 436, 451, 614, 629, 1241, 1505, 1877, 2127, 2412, 2492, 2495, Byz, c, d, gig, syrp,h, copsa.[9]

In Acts 18:26 it reads την οδον του θεου along with P74, א, A, B, 33, 88, 326, 436, 614, 2412, 60, 1356.[10]

In Romans 8:1 it reads Ιησου κατα σαρκα περιπατουσιν αλλα κατα πνευμα, for Ιησου. The reading of the manuscript is supported by אc, Dc, K, P, 33, 88, 104, 326, 330, (436 omit μη), 456, 614, 630, 1241, 1877, 1962, 1984, 1985, 2492, 2495, Byz, Lect.[11]

The text of Romans 16:25-27 is following 14:23, as in Codex Angelicus Codex Athous Lavrensis, Uncial 0209 326 330 451 460 614 1241 1877 1881 1984 1985 2492 2495.[12]

In 1 Corinthians 2:1 it reads μαρτυριον along with B D G P Ψ 33 81 104 326 330 451 614 629 630 1241 1739 1877 1881 1962 1984 2127 2492 2495 Byz Lect it vg syrh copsa arm eth. Other manuscripts read μυστηριον or σωτηριον.[13]

In 1 Corinthians 7:5 it reads τη προσευχη (prayer) along with \mathfrak{P}11, \mathfrak{P}46, א*, A, B, C, D, F, G, P, Ψ, 6, 33, 81, 104, 629, 630, 1739, 1877, 1881, 1962, it vg, cop, arm, eth. Other manuscripts read τη νηστεια και τη προσευχη (fasting and prayer) or τη προσευχη και νηστεια (prayer and fasting).[14][15]

In 1 Timothy 3:16 it has textual variant θεός ἐφανερώθη (God manifested) (Sinaiticuse, A2, C2, Dc, K, L, P, Ψ, 81, 104, 326, 330, 436, 451, 614, 629, 630, 1241, 1739, 1877, 1881, 1962, 1984, 1985, 2492, 2495, Byz, Lect), against ὃς ἐφανερώθη (he was manifested) supported by Sinaiticus, Codex Alexandrinus, Ephraemi, Boernerianus, 33, 365, 442, 2127, 599.[16][17]

In 2 Timothy 4:19 it has additional reading Λεκτραν την γυναικα αυτου και Σιμαιαν και Ζηνωνα τους υιους αυτου, this reading occurs in several other manuscripts and in Acta Pauli and Tecla.[18]

History[edit]

It is dated by the INTF to the 11th century.[2]

The manuscript was given by Christina of Sweden to Cardinal Dezio Azzolino, and bought from him by Alexander VIII (1689-1691) — like codices 154, 155, 156.[3][4] The text of the manuscript was examined by Bandini, Birch (about 1782), Scholz, and Burgon. C. R. Gregory saw it in 1886.[3]

Formerly it was labelled by 40a, 46p, and 12r. Gregory in 1908 gave it the number 181.[1]

It is currently housed at the Vatican Library (Reg. gr. 179), at Rome.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gregory, Caspar René (1908). Die griechischen Handschriften des Neuen Testament. Leipzig: J. C. Hinrichs'sche Buchhandlung. p. 54. 
  2. ^ a b c d e K. Aland, M. Welte, B. Köster, K. Junack, "Kurzgefasste Liste der griechischen Handschriften des Neues Testaments", Walter de Gruyter, Berlin, New York 1994, p. 57.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Gregory, Caspar René (1900). Textkritik des Neuen Testaments 1. Leipzig: J.C. Hinrichs. p. 267. 
  4. ^ a b Scrivener, Frederick Henry Ambrose; Edward Miller (1894). A Plain Introduction to the Criticism of the New Testament 1 (4 ed.). London: George Bell & Sons. p. 287. 
  5. ^ a b David Alan Black, New Testament Textual Criticism (Baker Books, 2006), p. 65.
  6. ^ Aland, Kurt; Aland, Barbara (1995). The Text of the New Testament: An Introduction to the Critical Editions and to the Theory and Practice of Modern Textual Criticism. Erroll F. Rhodes (trans.). Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. pp. 129, 132. ISBN 978-0-8028-4098-1. 
  7. ^ UBS3, p. 441.
  8. ^ UBS3, p. 464.
  9. ^ NA26, p. 480
  10. ^ UBS3, p. 499.
  11. ^ UBS3, p. 548.
  12. ^ UBS3, pp. 576-577.
  13. ^ UBS3, p. 581.
  14. ^ NA26, p. 450.
  15. ^ UBS3, p. 591.
  16. ^ Bruce M. Metzger, A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament (Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft: Stuttgart 2001), pp. 573-573.
  17. ^ 1 Timothy 3:16 in Codex Alexandrinus at the Bible Research
  18. ^ NA26, p. 556.

Further reading[edit]

  • Herman C. Hoskier, Concerning the Text of the Apocalypse 1 (London, 1929), pp. 17-24

External links[edit]