NASA Astronaut Group 16

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Group photo

NASA's Astronaut Group 16 was announced by NASA on 1 May 1996. The class was nicknamed "The Sardines" for being such a large class, humorously implying that their training sessions would be as tightly packed as sardines in a can. These 44 candidates were in fact the largest astronaut class ever. NASA selected so many candidates in preparation for the anticipated need for ISS crew members, along with regular shuttle needs.

Pilots[edit]

STS-109 Columbia[1] (Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission; Columbia's last successful flight)
STS-110 Atlantis[2] (ISS assembly mission – launched the S0 Truss Segment)
STS-122 Atlantis[2] (ISS assembly mission – launched the Columbus Laboratory)
STS-104 Atlantis[3] (ISS assembly mission – launched the Quest Joint Airlock)
STS-118 Endeavour[3] (ISS assembly mission – launched the S5 Truss Segment)
STS-129 Atlantis[3]
STS-102 Discovery[4] (ISS resupply mission)
STS-114 Discovery[4] (the first "Return to Flight" mission after the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster)
Pilot, STS-108 Endeavour[5] (ISS supply mission)
Pilot, STS-121 Discovery[5] (ISS resupply mission; second "Return to Flight" mission after the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster)
Commander, STS-124 Discovery[5] (ISS assembly mission – launched the Japanese Experiment Module)
Commander, STS-134 Endeavour[5] (ISS assembly mission – launched the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-02 (AMS-02) and ExPRESS Logistics Carrier-3(ELC-3))
STS-103 Discovery (Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission)[6]
STS-118 Endeavour (ISS assembly mission – launched the S5 Truss Segment)[6]
Expedition 25/26[6]
Soyuz TMA-01M (launch and landing vehicle for Expedition 25/26)[6]
STS-111 Endeavour[7] (ISS resupply mission)
STS-113 Endeavour[7] (launched the P1 Truss Segment, last flight before the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster)
STS-107 Columbia[9] (orbital science mission; last flight of Space Shuttle Columbia – RCC panel damage resulted in disintegration of Columbia)
STS-98 Atlantis[10] (ISS assembly mission – launched Destiny)
STS-116 Discovery[10] (ISS assembly mission – maunched the P5 Truss Segment)
STS-127 Endeavour[10]

Mission specialists[edit]

STS-107 Columbia[11] (orbital science mission; last flight of Space Shuttle Columbia – RCC panel damage resulted in disintegration of Columbia)
STS-106 Atlantis[12] (ISS supply mission)
STS-115 Atlantis (ISS assembly mission – launched the P3/P4 Truss Assemblies)[12]
STS-114 Discovery (the first "Return to Flight" mission after the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster)[15]
STS-107 Columbia[16] (orbital science mission; last flight of Space Shuttle Columbia – RCC panel damage resulted in disintegration of Columbia)
Soyuz TMA-4 (the launch and landing vehicle of Expedition 9)[17]
ISS Expedition 9 (6 month mission to the ISS)[17]
Soyuz TMA-13(launch vehicle for Expedition 18)
Expedition 18
Mission Specialist, STS-134 Endeavour [17]
STS-105 Discovery (ISS resupply flight)[18]
STS-117 Atlantis (ISS assembly mission – launched the S3/S4 Truss Assemblies)[18]
STS-128 Discovery [18]
STS-113 Endeavour (ISS assembly mission – launched the P1 Truss Segment)[19]
STS-116 Discovery (ISS assembly mission – launched the P5 Truss Segment)[20]
STS-112 Atlantis[21] (ISS assembly mission – maunched the S1 Truss Segment)
STS-126 Endeavour
ISS Expedition 18 – Flight Engineer (3 month expedition)[22]
STS-135 Atlantis
STS-109 Columbia[23] (Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission; Columbia's last successful flight)
STS-125(Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission)
STS-106 Atlantis[24] (ISS supply mission)
STS-118 Endeavour[24] (ISS assembly mission – launched the S5 Truss Segment)
STS-131 Discovery[24]
STS-110 Atlantis (ISS assembly mission – launched the S0 Truss Segment)[25]
STS-121 Discovery (ISS resupply mission; second Return to Flight mission after the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster)[26]
Lisa Nowak was arrested on February 5, 2007, after confronting a woman entangled in a love triangle with a fellow astronaut. She was fired by NASA on March 7,[27] and she became the first astronaut to be both grounded and dismissed (prior astronauts who were grounded due to non-medical issues usually resigned or retired).
STS-113 Endeavour (the launch vehicle of Expedition 6)[28]
ISS Expedition 6 (5½ month mission to the ISS)[28]
Soyuz TMA-1 (the landing vehicle of Expedition 6)[28]
STS-126 Endeavour (ISS resupply mission ULF2)
STS-100 Endeavour (ISS assembly mission – launched Canadarm2)[29]
ISS Expedition 11 (6 month mission to the ISS)[29]
Soyuz TMA-6 (the launch and landing vehicle of Expedition 11)[29]
STS-119 Discovery
STS-102 Discovery[30] (ISS resupply mission)
STS-112 Atlantis[31] (ISS assembly mission – launched the S1 Truss Segment)
STS-121 Discovery[31] (ISS resupply mission; Second "Return to Flight" Mission after the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster)
STS-132 Atlantis[31]
STS-115 Atlantis (ISS assembly mission – launched the P3/P4 Truss Assemblies)[32]
STS-126 Endeavour (ISS resupply mission ULF2)
STS-108 Endeavour[33] (ISS supply mission)
STS-120 Discovery (the mission launched him to the ISS)[33]
ISS Expedition 16 (served as a Flight Engineer)[33]
STS-122 Atlantis (the mission returned him to earth)[33]
STS-110 Atlantis[34] (ISS assembly mission – launched the S0 Truss Segment)
STS-122 Atlantis[34] (ISS assembly mission – launched the Columbus Laboratory)
STS-135 Atlantis
STS-111 Endeavour (the launch vehicle of Expedition 5)[35]
ISS Expedition 5 (6 month mission to the ISS)[35]
STS-113 Endeavour (the landing vehicle of Expedition 5)[35]
Soyuz TMA-11 (the launch and landing vehicle of Expedition 16)[35]
ISS Expedition 16 (6 month mission to the ISS)[35]
STS-101 Atlantis (ISS supply mission)[36]
Soyuz TMA-8 (the launch and landing vehicle of Expedition 13)[36]
ISS Expedition 13 (6 month mission to the ISS)[36]
STS-121 Discovery[37] (ISS resupply mission; second Return to Flight mission after the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster)
STS-120 Discovery (ISS assembly mission – launched Harmony (Node 2))[37]
STS-131 Discovery[37]

International mission specialists[edit]

STS-95 Discovery[38][39] (orbital science mission)
Soyuz TMA-3 (flew as a Flight Engineer for the Soyuz TMA)[38][39]
Soyuz TMA-2 (flew as a Flight Engineer for the Soyuz TMA) [38][39]
STS-116 Discovery (ISS assembly mission – launched the P5 Truss Segment)[40][41]
STS-128 Discovery[40]
STS-75 Columbia[42][43] (orbital science mission) – flight performed before being selected as Mission Specialist
STS-100 Endeavour (ISS assembly mission – launched Canadarm2)[42][43]
STS-52 Columbia[44][45] (deployed the LAGEOS-II Satellite) – flight performed before being selected as Mission Specialist
STS-115 Atlantis (ISS assembly mission – launched the P3/P4 Truss Assemblies)[44][45]
STS-47 Endeavour[46] (orbital science mission) – flight performed before being selected as Mission Specialist
STS-99 Endeavour (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission)[46]
STS-114 Discovery (the first "Return to Flight" mission after the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster)[47]
STS-96 Discovery (ISS supply mission)[48][49]
STS-127 Endeavour (ISS supply mission)
STS-111 Endeavour (ISS resupply mission)[50][51]
STS-99 Endeavour (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission)[52][53]

References[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  1. ^ a b NASA (2004). "Astronaut Bio: Duane G. Carey". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  2. ^ a b c NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Stephen N. Frick". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  3. ^ a b c d NASA (2007). "Astronaut Bio: Charles O. Hobaugh". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  4. ^ a b c NASA (2007). "Astronaut Bio: James M. Kelly". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  5. ^ a b c d e NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Mark E. Kelly". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  6. ^ a b c d e NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Scott J. Kelly". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  7. ^ a b c NASA (2007). "Astronaut Bio: Paul Lockhart". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  8. ^ NASA (2004). "Astronaut Bio: C. Loria". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  9. ^ a b NASA (2004). "Astronaut Bio: William McCool". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  10. ^ a b c d NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Mark Polansky". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  11. ^ a b NASA (2004). "Astronaut Bio: David M. Brown". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  12. ^ a b c NASA (2007). "Astronaut Bio: Daniel C. Burbank". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  13. ^ NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Yvonne D. Cagle". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  14. ^ NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Fernando "Frank" Caldeiro". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  15. ^ a b NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Charles J. Camarda". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  16. ^ a b NASA (2004). "Astronaut Bio: Laurel B. Clark". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  17. ^ a b c d NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: E. Michael Fincke". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  18. ^ a b c d NASA (2007). "Astronaut Bio: Patrick G. Forrester". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  19. ^ a b NASA (2005). "Astronaut Bio: John B. Herrington". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  20. ^ a b NASA (2007). "Astronaut Bio: Joan E. Higginbotham". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  21. ^ a b "Sandra H. Magnus (Ph.D.) NASA Astronaut". Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. NASA. June 2008. Retrieved 2008-11-16. 
  22. ^ Carreau, Mark (2008-11-15). "Endeavour docks with international space station". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 2008-11-16. 
  23. ^ a b NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Michael J. Massimino". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  24. ^ a b c d NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Richard A. Mastracchio". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  25. ^ a b NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Lee M.E. Morin". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  26. ^ a b NASA (2007). "Astronaut Bio: Lisa M. Nowak". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  27. ^ MSNBC (2007). "NASA fires astronaut Lisa Nowak". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  28. ^ a b c d NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Donald R. Pettit". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  29. ^ a b c d NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: John L. Phillips". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  30. ^ a b NASA (2005). "Astronaut Bio: Paul W. Richards". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  31. ^ a b c d NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Piers J. Sellers". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  32. ^ a b NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  33. ^ a b c d e NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Daniel M. Tani". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  34. ^ a b c NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Rex J. Walheim". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  35. ^ a b c d e f NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Peggy A. Whitson". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  36. ^ a b c d NASA (2007). "Astronaut Bio: Jeffrey N. Williams". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  37. ^ a b c d NASA (2007). "Astronaut Bio: Stephanie D. Wilson". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  38. ^ a b c d ESA (2007). "ESA – Human Spaceflight and Exploration - Astronauts – Pedro Duque". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  39. ^ a b c d NASA (2005). "Astronaut Bio: Pedro Duque". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  40. ^ a b c ESA (2008). "ESA – Human Spaceflight and Exploration - Astronauts - Christer Fuglesang". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  41. ^ a b NASA (2007). "Astronaut Bio: A. Christer Fuglesang". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  42. ^ a b c ESA (2005). "ESA – Human Spaceflight and Exploration - Astronauts – Umberto Guidoni". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  43. ^ a b c NASA (2005). "Astronaut Bio: Umberto Guidoni". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  44. ^ a b c CSA (2007). "CSA – Steven G. MacLean". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  45. ^ a b c NASA (2007). "Astronaut Bio: Steven G. MacLean". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  46. ^ a b c NASA (2003). "Astronaut Bio: Mamoru Mohri". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  47. ^ a b NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Soichi Noguchi". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  48. ^ a b CSA (2008). "CSA – Julie Payette". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  49. ^ a b NASA (2008). "Astronaut Bio: Julie Payette". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  50. ^ a b ESA (2004). "ESA – Human Spaceflight and Exploration - Astronauts - Philippe Perrin". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  51. ^ a b NASA (2005). "Astronaut Bio: Philippe Perrin". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  52. ^ a b ESA (2004). "ESA – Human Spaceflight and Exploration - Astronauts – Gerhard Thiele". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 
  53. ^ a b NASA (2004). "Astronaut Bio: Gerhard Thiele". Retrieved 2008-06-26. 

External links[edit]