Norwegian Bridge Federation

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Norwegian Bridge Federation (Norwegian: Norsk Bridgeforbund, NBF) founded in 1932, is the national body for bridge in Norway.

The Norwegian Bridge Federation was founded by Inga and Odd Arnesen[1] on 29 January 1932 ; at that time it had three member clubs.[2] Another national bridge organisation had been founded on 30 November 1931 by Wilhelm Nickelsen;[3] by mutual agreement, this was merged into what is now the NBF in April 1932.

It currently has 380 member clubs, divided into 25 circuits. The federation is a member of the European Bridge League, which in turn is a member organisation of the World Bridge Federation, and is also a member of the Norwegian Mind Sports Federation (Norsk Tankesportforbund). As of 2013 it has 9,203 registered members.[4] In 1993, it was decided that the organisation should publish a periodical six times a year;[2] the first issue of Norsk Bridge was published in February 1995, although since 2006 the frequency has been reduced to four times a year.

The organisation's office is at Ullevaal Stadion. Since 2008, the president has been Jan Aasen. The vice-president is Per Watz. The general secretary is Knut Brinchmann.

Administration[edit]

Presidents from to
Anton Midsem 1932 1934
Johannes Brun 1934 1937
Oluf Aall 1937 1939
Wilhelm Schibbye 1939 1945
Niels Marius Nielsen 1945 1950
Karl Fr. Dawes 1950 1954
Ranik Halle 1954 1964
Bjørn Larsen 1964 1967
Ambjørg Amundsen 1967 1971
Baard Baardsen 1971 1975
Knut Koppang 1975 1977
Bjørn Larsen 1977 1979
Finn Søderstrøm 1979 1981
Ole Smestad 1981 1983
Arild H. Johansen 1983 1987
Hans Jørgen Bakke 1987 1988
Jakob Madsen 1988 1991
Per Bryde Sundseth 1991 1993
Arild H. Johansen 1993 1995
Helge Stanghelle 1995 1996
Jan Aasen 1996 2004
Helge Stanghelle 2004 2008
Jan Aasen 2008

Bridge in Norway[edit]

Norway is one of the top nations in bridge; the country won the world team championship in 2007, the NBF's 75th anniversary year, took silver in 1993 and 2001, and bronze in 1997,[5] and in 2008 at the first World Mind Sports Games in Beijing won more medals than any other nation, two gold, one silver and three bronze.[6] However, despite a "massive recruiting effort under the auspices of the NBF", the game attracts few young people and the average age of bridge club members is rising.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]