Palau Blaugrana

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Palau Blaugrana
Palau Blaugrana 03.jpg
Location Barcelona, Spain
Owner Futbol Club Barcelona
Capacity 7,585
Construction
Opened 23 October 1971
Architect Francesc Cavaller
Tenants
FC Barcelona Bàsquet (ACB)
FC Barcelona Handbol (ASOBAL)
FC Barcelona Hoquei (OK Liga)
FC Barcelona Futsal (Primera División)

Palau Blaugrana (Catalan pronunciation: [pəˈɫaw ˌβɫawˈɣɾanə], meaning in English "Blue and deep red Palace") is an arena in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain, belonging to FC Barcelona. The 7,585 seating capacity arena is home to the basketball, handball, roller hockey, and futsal divisions of FC Barcelona. Palau Blaugrana is located between Mini Estadi and the Camp Nou.

History[edit]

Built in 1971, the stadium originally held 5,696 spectators, but the facility was remodeled in 1994 to fit the current capacity of 7,585. During the 1992 Summer Olympics, the arena hosted several events, including roller hockey, taekwondo and judo.[1]

Several basketball, handball and roller hockey players have had their jerseys retired:
4 Andrés Jiménez, 7 Nacho Solozábal and 15 Epi for basketball and 2 Òscar Grau, 7 Iñaki Urdangarin, 14 Joan Sagalés, 16 David Barrufet for handball and 21 Alberto Borregan for Roller Hockey

The future[edit]

Under Sandro Rosell's presidency, the club announced that by 2013 it plans to build a new Palau Blaugrana for the handball and basketball teams, with a capacity of 12,000 seats. Also included in the plan, is a smaller campus with a capacity of 3,000 seats, plus [a special conditions] for hotel partners (operated by a specialist company located on the corner of Aristides Maillol with John XXIII), new parking spaces and an auditorium, with a 2,000 capacity, for the foundation, including the offices of the club.

Panoramical view during a Euroleague Basketball game in February 2008

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 41°22′48.29″N 2°07′12.18″E / 41.3800806°N 2.1200500°E / 41.3800806; 2.1200500

Preceded by
Stade Pierre de Coubertin
Paris
Masters Cup
Venue

1972
Succeeded by
Boston Garden
Boston
Preceded by
Ginásio do Ibirapuera
São Paulo
FIBA Intercontinental Cup
Final Venue

1985
Succeeded by
Estadio Obras Sanitarias
Buenos Aires