Pennsylvania Route 100

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PA Route 100 marker

PA Route 100
Route information
Maintained by PennDOT
Length: 59.409 mi[1] (95.610 km)
Major junctions
South end: US 202 near West Chester
  US 30 in Exton
I-76 / Penna Turnpike near Lionville
US 422 near Pottstown
US 222 in Trexlertown
I-78 / US 22 in Fogelsville
North end: PA 309 in Pleasant Corners
Location
Counties: Chester, Montgomery, Berks, Lehigh
Highway system
PA 99 PA 101
US 62 PA-62 (1926).svg PA 63

Pennsylvania Route 100 (PA 100) is a 59.4-mile (95.6 km) long state highway in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania that runs from U.S. Route 202 (US 202) near West Chester north to PA 309 in Pleasant Corners. The route runs between the western suburbs of Philadelphia and the Lehigh Valley region of the state, serving Chester, Montgomery, Berks, and Lehigh counties. PA 100 intersects several important highways including US 30 in Exton, the Pennsylvania Turnpike (Interstate 76, I-76) near Lionville, US 422 near Pottstown, US 222 in Trexlertown, and I-78/US 22 in Fogelsville. PA 100 has several sections which are multi-lane divided highway with some interchanges, including between US 202 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike in Chester County, between south of Pottstown and New Berlinville, and between Trexlertown and Fogelsville.

What would become PA 100 was originally designated as PA 62 in 1927, running between the Delaware border south of Chadds Ford and US 309/PA 312 in Allentown. PA 62 was rerouted to reach its northern end at PA 29 (now PA 309) in Pleasant Corners a year later. In the 1930s, PA 62 was renumbered to PA 100 to avoid duplication with US 62. In the 1950s, the route was realigned between south of Bechtelsville and Bally. PA 100 was moved to its four-lane alignment between south of Pottstown and New Berlinville in the 1960s. Between the 1950s and 1960s, the northern terminus was cut back to Fogelsville with US 309 replacing the route north of there. The section of the route between Exton and Lionville was widened between the 1950s and the 1970s. A freeway along the route in Chester County was proposed in the 1960s, with a short section built between PA 100 south of Exton and US 202 north of West Chester. The southern terminus of PA 100 was cut back from Delaware Route 100 (DE 100) at the state line to its current location in 2003 in order to reduce through traffic in West Chester. PA 100 was rerouted to bypass Trexlertown in 2005. A bypass of Eagle was completed in 2009; the route remained on its original alignment after the bypass was built.

Route description[edit]

Chester County[edit]

Northbound PA 100 shield in Exton, past the interchange with US 30

PA 100 begins at a partial interchange with the US 202 freeway north of West Chester in West Goshen Township, Chester County, with access to southbound US 202 and from northbound US 202. From this interchange, the route heads northwest as a four-lane freeway past suburban development, crossing into West Whiteland Township. PA 100 comes to a southbound exit and northbound entrance with Pottstown Pike, at which point the freeway ends and the route continues as four-lane divided Pottstown Pike. The road passes under Amtrak's Philadelphia to Harrisburg Main Line near the Exton station serving Amtrak and SEPTA's Paoli/Thorndale Line trains and an abandoned railroad line before coming to an interchange with the US 30 freeway.[2][3]

Past this, the route heads north-northwest into the community of Exton as a six-lane divided highway and passes commerical development, running to the east of Main Street at Exton. PA 100 crosses US 30 Bus. (Lincoln Highway) and passes to the west of Exton Square Mall. The road heads north past more commercial development and narrows to four lanes as it heads into more wooded areas with some development, crossing into Uwchlan Township. The route curves to the northwest and continues near suburban residential and commercial development, turning to the west as it reaches an intersection with PA 113 in the community of Lionville. PA 100 heads northwest between woods to the southwest and fields to the northeast as it reaches a trumpet interchange providing access to the Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-76) at the Downingtown interchange. The road passes near business parks and enters Upper Uwchlan Township as it comes to a bridge under the Pennsylvania Turnpike and reaches the community of Eagle. Between Exton and Eagle, several intersections along PA 100 are controlled by jughandles.[2][3]

Upon reaching Eagle, PA 100 becomes a five-lane road with a center left-turn lane before it turns northwest to remain on two-lane undivided Pottstown Pike, with Graphite Mine Road continuing straight to bypass Eagle to the east. The route passes businesses in the center of the community before it heads north and intersects with Graphite Mine Road again. The road continues past a mix of residential subdivisions with some farm fields, and businesses. PA 100 crosses into West Vincent Township, where it gains a second northbound lane as it passes through woods. The route becomes a three-lane road with a center left-turn lane as it passes commercial development and comes to an intersection with PA 401 in the village of Ludwigs Corner. Following this, PA 100 becomes a two-lane road and runs through a mix of farmland and woodland, crossing into East Nantmeal Township. The road curves northeast through forested areas and enters South Coventry Township, where it turns north and briefly reenters East Nantmeal Township before continuing back into South Coventry Township. The route continues through rural areas with some development, crossing French Creek, and comes to the PA 23 junction in the community of Bucktown.[2][3]

After this intersection, PA 100 heads north through wooded areas with some farm fields and residences as a three-lane road with a center turn lane. The road crosses Pigeon Creek into North Coventry Township and passes farm fields before entering commercial areas. The route widens into a divided highway as South Hanover Street splits off to the northeast. PA 100 becomes a two-lane undivided road and passes a mix of rural land and development, widening into a four-lane divided highway. The route comes to an interchange with PA 724 to the west of the community of South Pottstown and to the east of the Coventry Mall. A short distance later, the road reaches a cloverleaf interchange with the US 422 freeway.[2][3]

Montgomery County[edit]

PA 100 northbound at Shoemaker Road in Pottstown

Upon crossing the Schuylkill River, PA 100 enters the borough of Pottstown in Montgomery County, where it passes through woods before coming to a bridge over Norfolk Southern's Harrisburg Line and reaching a partial interchange with West High Street, with access from northbound PA 100 to westbound West High Street and from eastbound West High Street to southbound PA 100. Immediately after, the route intersects the southern terminus of PA 663, which heads east on West King Street, at-grade. The road passes businesses and curves northeast, crossing the Colebrookdale Railroad at-grade and crossing over Manatawny Creek and Manatawny Street. PA 100 passes near residential and commercial development, passing through a corner of West Pottsgrove Township before it enters Upper Pottsgrove Township. The road continues north through wooded areas with some nearby homes and busineses, coming to a bridge over Pine Ford Road before reaching a diamond interchange with Farmington Avenue. The route heads northeast through a mix of farmland and woodland, curving north into Douglass Township. PA 100 heads northeast through rural land with some development and turns north to encounter PA 73 at a diamond interchange to the west of Gilbertsville. Past this interchange, the road continues north near commercial development.[2][4]

Berks County[edit]

Upon crossing County Line Road, PA 100 enters Colebrookdale Township in Berks County and heads north through rural areas with some development as an unnamed road, curving northwest to an interchange with Montgomery Avenue near the community of New Berlinville that provides access to the borough of Boyertown. Following this interchange, the route narrows to a two-lane undivided road and passes by businesses. The road passes east of a quarry and crosses into Washington Township, bypassing the borough of Bechtelsville to the east. PA 100 turns to the northeast and passes through a mix of woods and fields with some residential and commercial development, heading to the west of Grandview Speedway. The route heads through the community of Schultzville before it enters the borough of Bally. Upon entering Bally, the road becomes Main Street and passes several homes along with a few businesses. PA 100 leaves Bally for Washington Township again and becomes unnamed, running through farmland with some woods and homes. Upon reaching the community of Clayton, the route crosses into Hereford Township and continues through agricultural areas to an intersection with PA 29 in the community of Hereford. At this point, PA 29 turns north for a concurrency with PA 100, and the two routes head north into woodland with some fields and residences.[2][5]

Lehigh County[edit]

PA 100 southbound at split with US 222 in Trexlertown

PA 29/PA 100 crosses into Upper Milford Township in Lehigh County and becomes Chestnut Street, curving northeast through wooded areas with some farmland and development. The road turns north near the community of Old Zionsville before it passes through the residential community of Shimerville. PA 100 splits from PA 29 by turning northwest onto North Kings Highway, with PA 100 Truck heading north along PA 29. The route begins a winding path to the northwest as it descends a hill through a mix of farms and trees. The road heads northwest into the borough of Macungie and becomes Main Street, a three lane road with a center left-turn lane that passes several homes. PA 100 Truck rejoins at the Chestnut Street intersection and PA 100 continues past more residences and businesses in the borough. The route crosses Norfolk Southern's Reading Line and passes more commercial establishments as it enters Lower Macungie Township and becomes an unnamed road. The road heads west through a mix of farmland and residential and commercial development, curving to the northwest and losing the center turn lane. PA 100 crosses Norfolk Southern's C&F Secondary and intersects Spring Creek Road, at which point it becomes a a two-lane divided highway that bypasses Trexlertown to the west. The route continues northwest near farmland and residential subdivisons into Upper Macungie Township and intersects Weilers Road, which heads north to intersect Hamilton Boulevard. A short distance later, PA 100 intersects US 222 at a partial interchange, where northbound US 222 merges onto PA 100 and southbound US 222 splits from PA 100. All other connections between PA 100 and US 222 are provided by Weilers Road and Hamilton Boulevard.[2][6]

US 222 and PA 100 continue north concurrent as the four-lane divided Frederick J. Jaindl, Jr. Memorial Highway, passing near homes. The road curves northeast and runs between warehouses to the northwest and housing developments to the southeast. PA 100 splits from US 222 at a diamond interchange, at which point PA 100 continues north and Trexlertown Road heads south. The route runs north-northwest through a mix of farm fields and an industrial/warehouse area as an unnamed four-lane divided highway. The road passes businesses and crosses a Norfolk Southern railroad branch before reaching a cloverleaf interchange with I-78/US 22. Past this, PA 100 heads into the community of Fogelsville and crosses Main Street/Tilghman Street. The route heads through commercial areas and narrows to a two-lane undivided road, entering wooded areas and turning to the northwest. The road enters Lowhill Township and runs through a mix of farmland and woodland with some development, passing through the community of Claussville. PA 100 winds northwest through more rural areas, running through Lyon Valley. The road heads north into more wooded areas and crosses the Jordan Creek in the community of Lowhill. The route continues alongside the creek and winds northwest into Heidelberg Township. PA 100 continues north to its northern terminus at a T-intersection with PA 309 in the community of Pleasant Corners.[2][6]

History[edit]

PA Route 62
Location: Chadds FordPleasant Corners
Existed: 1927–1930s

When Pennsylvania first legislated routes in 1911, what would become PA 100 was legislated as Legislative Route 282 between the Delaware border and Lenape, Legislative Route 134 between Lenape and West Chester, Legislative Route 147 between West Chester and Pottstown, Legislative Route 284 between Pottstown and Hereford, and Legislative Route 158 between Hereford and Shimerville. At this time, the road was paved between Boyertown and north of Bally.[7] By 1926, the entire length of the road between Chadds Ford and north of Hereford was paved.[8] PA 62 was designated in 1927 to run from the Delaware border south of Chadds Ford north to US 309/PA 312 in Allentown. The route followed the Brandywine Creek through Chadds Ford to Lenape, where it ran concurrent with PA 52 to West Chester. From here, PA 62 headed north along Pottstown Pike to Pottstown, where it passed through the borough on Hanover Street. The route continued north on Farmington Avenue to Boyertown and ran through Bechtelsville and Barto on its way to Bally. PA 62 ran north along present-day PA 100 to Shimerville, where it continued to Allentown.[9][10] A year later, PA 62 was realigned at Shimerville to head north through Macungie, Trexlertown, and Fogelsville to its new northern terminus at an intersection with PA 29 (now PA 309) in Pleasant Corners. PA 29 replaced the PA 62 designation between Shimerville and Allentown. By this time, the route was paved from north of Bally to Macungie.[10] By 1930, the route was paved between the Delaware border and Chadds Ford and between Macungie and Fogelsville. At this time, the road was under construction from Fogelsville to north of Claussville.[11]

PA 62 was renumbered to PA 100 in the 1930s in order to avoid conflicting with US 62, which was designated in the northwestern part of the state. Also, the road was paved between Fogelsville and Pleasant Corners.[12] At the Delaware border, PA 100 connected to DE 100, which was designated in 1938.[13] By 1953, PA 100 was realigned to its current straight alignment between south of Bechtelsville and Bally, bypassing Bechtelsville and Barto to the east. The former alignment is now known as Main Street and Old Route 100.[14]

In 1954, the current alignment between Hanover Street in North Coventry Township and Farmington Avenue in Upper Pottsgrove Township was built, with interchanges at PA 83 (now PA 724) and US 422 (High Street).[15][16][17] At this time, PA 100 still continued through Pottstown on Hanover Street and Farmington Avenue. In the 1950s, a realigned US 309 replaced the PA 100 designation between US 22 in Fogelsville and Pleasant Corners.[18] By 1959, PA 100 was widened into a divided highway between Boot Road and US 30 (now US 30 Bus.) in Exton.[19] In 1964, the current divided highway alignment of PA 100 was built between Farmington Avenue in Upper Pottsgrove Township and New Berlinville, which included interchanges at Farmington Avenue, PA 73, and Montgomery Avenue.[20][21][22] PA 100 was rerouted to the new alignment between Hanover Street in North Coventry Township and New Berlinville; the former alignment is now Hanover Street, Farmington Avenue, PA 562, and Reading Avenue.[21][22]

The northern terminus of PA 100 was extended back to Pleasant Corners at PA 309 in the 1960s, replacing the former US 309 designation between Fogelsville and Pleasant Corners.[23] In the 1960s, the Pennsylvania Department of Highways had plans for an expressway along the PA 100 corridor in Chester County that would connect to US 202 in West Chester.[24] In 1968, a freeway was built connecting PA 100 south of Exton to US 202 north of West Chester.[23][25] In the 1970s, PA 100 was widened into a divided highway between Exton and Lionville.[26] The freeway connecting US 202 and PA 100 became known as SR 2023 when the Location Referencing System was established in 1987.[27][28]

In 2003, the southern terminus of PA 100 was moved from the Delaware border to its current location at US 202, being rerouted to follow the freeway connecting US 202 to Exton. PA 100 was truncated in order to reduce truck traffic along rural roads and on the streets through West Chester. Plans to remove the PA 100 designation along this stretch date back to 1990 when the municipalities along the route, with support from the West Chester Regional Planning Commission, passed resolutions to remove the designation. The plan was approved by the Chester County Planning Commission in 1999 and was approved by PennDOT in 2002. The truncation of the route caused confusion to motorists and affected businesses along the route. Chadds Ford Township placed "Old Route 100" signs along the former alignment to reduce motorist confusion.[29] The former route of PA 100 between the Delaware border and Exton was designated SR 3100 in Chester County and SR 3101 in Delaware County, which follows Chadds Ford Road, Creek Road, PA 52, US 322 Bus., North High Street, and Pottstown Pike.[30][31]

In 2002, construction began on a bypass route for PA 100 and US 222 around Trexlertown. On September 29, 2005, PA 100 was rerouted to bypass the community to the west along the four-lane divided Trexlertown Bypass.[32][33] The former alignment through Trexlertown became known as Trexlertown Road, which is designated SR 6100.[6][32] US 222 was moved onto the bypass on September 28, 2007 following the extension of the bypass east to allow US 222 to bypass the community. The bypass cost $144 million to build.[33] In 1988, plans were made to bypass the section of PA 100 through Eagle which was narrow and suffered from traffic congestion. A bypass to the east of the community was proposed as opposed to adding turn lanes along the existing route as the latter would have required the demolition of several buildings.[34] The Eagle Bypass was delayed for years by funding issues.[35] Construction on the Eagle Bypass was slated to begin in 2003.[36] The bypass was completed between Byers Road and PA 100 north of Eagle in fall 2005.[37] The remainder of the bypass south to PA 100 south of Eagle was completed on August 19, 2009.[38] The bypass was called Graphite Mine Road and is designated as SR 1055. PA 100 continues to follow Pottstown Pike through the center of Eagle.[37]

Major intersections[edit]

County Location Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
Chester West Goshen Township 0.000 0.000 US 202 south Interchange
West Whiteland Township 2.891 4.653 Pottstown Pike Southbound exit and northbound entrance, former routing of PA 100
3.277 5.274 US 30 (Exton Bypass) – Downingtown, Lancaster, King of Prussia, Philadelphia Interchange
3.837 6.175
US 30 Bus. (Lincoln Highway) – Downingtown, Frazer
Uwchlan Township 6.769 10.894 PA 113 (Uwchlan Avenue) – Downingtown, Phoenixville
7.710 12.408 I-76 / Penna Turnpike – Harrisburg, Philadelphia, New Jersey Exit 312 (Downingtown Exit) (I-76/PA Turnpike)
West Vincent Township 11.710 18.845 PA 401 (Conestoga Road) – Elverson, Malvern
South Coventry Township 16.562 26.654 PA 23 (Ridge Road) – St. Peters, Phoenixville
North Coventry Township 20.675 33.273 PA 724 (Schuylkill Road) – Birdsboro, Kenilworth, Phoenixville Interchange
21.115 33.981 US 422 – Reading, King of Prussia Interchange
Montgomery Pottstown 21.751 35.005 West High Street west Northbound exit and southbound entrance
21.784 35.058 PA 663 north (West King Street) Southern terminus of PA 663
Upper Pottsgrove Township 24.813 39.933 Farmington Avenue Interchange
Douglass Township 27.787 44.719 PA 73 (East Philadelphia Avenue) – Boyertown, Gilbertsville Interchange
Berks Colebrookdale Township 29.159 46.927 New Berlinville Interchange
Hereford Township 37.539 60.413 PA 29 south (Gravel Pike) – East Greenville Southern terminus of PA 29 concurrency
Lehigh Upper Milford Township 41.611 66.966
PA 29 / PA 100 Truck north (Chestnut Street) – Emmaus, Allentown
Northern terminus of PA 29 concurrency
Macungie 43.367 69.792
PA 100 Truck south (Chestnut Street) – Emmaus
Upper Macungie Township 47.913 77.108 US 222 south (Hamilton Boulevard) – Kutztown, Reading Southbound exit. Southern end of US 222 concurrency.
49.224 79.218 US 222 north (Frederick J. Jaindl, Jr. Memorial Highway) – Allentown PA 100 Northbound exit. North end of US 222 concurrency. US 222 continues to Allentown.
50.904 81.922 I-78 / US 22 – Harrisburg, Allentown Exit 49 (I-78/US 22)
Heidelberg Township 59.409 95.610 PA 309 – Tamaqua, Hazleton, Allentown
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

PA 100 Truck[edit]


PA Route 100 Truck
Location: Macungie
Length: 3.1 mi[39] (5.0 km)

Pennsylvania Route 100 Truck is a truck bypass of a winding portion of PA 100 between the north end of the PA 29 concurrency and Macungie on which trucks with trailers over 45 feet are not allowed. The route heads north on PA 29 before heading west along Buckeye Road and Chestnut Street concurrent with PA 29 Truck.[39][40]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bureau of Maintenance and Operations (January 2014). "Roadway Management System Straight Line Diagrams" (2014 ed.). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Retrieved September 11, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Google, Inc. "Pennsylvania Route 100". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://goo.gl/maps/AJVDZ. Retrieved January 4, 2015.
  3. ^ a b c d PennDOT (2014). Chester County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (Map). ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_pdf_files/Maps/GHS/Roadnames/chester_GHSN.PDF. Retrieved December 19, 2014.
  4. ^ PennDOT (2014). Montgomery County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (Map). ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_pdf_files/Maps/GHS/Roadnames/montgomery_GHSN.PDF. Retrieved January 5, 2015.
  5. ^ PennDOT (2014). Berks County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (Map). ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_pdf_files/Maps/GHS/Roadnames/berks_GHSN.PDF. Retrieved December 22, 2014.
  6. ^ a b c PennDOT (2014). Lehigh County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (Map). ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_pdf_files/Maps/GHS/Roadnames/lehigh_GHSN.PDF. Retrieved January 5, 2015.
  7. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Highways (1911). Map of Pennsylvania Showing State Highways (Map). ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_pdf_files/Maps/Statewide/Historic_OTMs/1911.pdf. Retrieved January 1, 2014.
  8. ^ Gulf Oil (1926). Pennsylvania Highway Map (eastern side) (Map). http://www.mapsofpa.com/art5pics/251c.jpg. Retrieved December 26, 2007.
  9. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Highways (1927). Pennsylvania Highway Map (Map). http://www.mapsofpa.com/roadcart/1927_2043m.jpg. Retrieved December 26, 2007.
  10. ^ a b Gulf Oil (1928). Pennsylvania Highway Map (Philadelphia Metro) (Map). http://www.mapsofpa.com/art5pics/1928phila3.jpg. Retrieved November 8, 2007.
  11. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Highways (1930). Tourist Map of Pennsylvania (Map). ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_pdf_files/Maps/Statewide/Historic_OTMs/1930fr.pdf. Retrieved January 1, 2014.
  12. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Highways (1940). Official Road Map of Pennsylvania (Map). ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_pdf_files/Maps/Statewide/Historic_OTMs/1940fr.pdf. Retrieved June 24, 2010.
  13. ^ Delaware State Highway Department (1938) (PDF). Official Road Map of the State of Delaware (Map). Cartography by The National Survey Co. (1938 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_010.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  14. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (1953). General Highway Map Berks County, Pennsylvania Sheet 1 (Map). ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_PDF_FILES/MAPS/Type_10_GHS_Historical_Scans/Berks_1953_Sheet_1.pdf. Retrieved January 6, 2015.
  15. ^ Staff (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 000000000010074". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved January 6, 2015. 
  16. ^ Staff (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 000000000027296". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved January 6, 2015. 
  17. ^ Staff (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 000000000027298". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved January 6, 2015. 
  18. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Highways (1960). Official Map of Pennsylvania (Map). ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_pdf_files/Maps/Statewide/Historic_OTMs/1960fr.pdf. Retrieved December 17, 2014.
  19. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Highways (1959). General Highway Map Chester County, Pennsylvania (Map) (Sheet 1 ed.). ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_PDF_FILES/MAPS/Type_10_GHS_Historical_Scans/Chester_1959_Sheet_1.pdf. Retrieved December 16, 2014.
  20. ^ Staff (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 000000000027192". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved January 6, 2015. 
  21. ^ a b Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (1967). General Highway Map Montgomery County, Pennsylvania Sheet 1 (Map). ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_PDF_FILES/Maps/Type_10_GHS_Historical_Scans/Berks_1966_Sheet_1.pdf. Retrieved January 6, 2015.
  22. ^ a b Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (1966). General Highway Map Berks County, Pennsylvania Sheet 1 (Map). ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_PDF_FILES/Maps/Type_10_GHS_Historical_Scans/Berks_1966_Sheet_1.pdf. Retrieved December 14, 2012.
  23. ^ a b Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (1970). Official Map of Pennsylvania (Map). ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_pdf_files/Maps/Statewide/Historic_OTMs/1970fr.pdf. Retrieved June 30, 2010.
  24. ^ 1985 Regional Transportation Plan (Report). Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission. 1969. OCLC 25700082.
  25. ^ Staff (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 000000000010402". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved January 6, 2015. 
  26. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (1980). Pennsylvania Official Transportation Map (Map). ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_pdf_files/Maps/Statewide/Historic_OTMs/1980fr.pdf. Retrieved January 6, 2015.
  27. ^ "Location Referencing System (LRS) -- Definitions, Uses, and Testing". Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. July 19, 2007. Retrieved January 21, 2012. 
  28. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (1991). General Highway Map Chester County, Pennsylvania (Map) (Sheet 1 ed.). ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_PDF_FILES/MAPS/Type_10_GHS_Historical_Scans/Chester_1991_Sheet_1.pdf. Retrieved January 6, 2015.
  29. ^ Petersen, Nancy (October 9, 2003). "Route 100 loses its way through West Chester". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved January 20, 2014. 
  30. ^ PennDOT (2003). Chester County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (Map). ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_PDF_FILES/MAPS/Type_10_GHS_Historical_Scans/Chester_2003.pdf. Retrieved January 6, 2015.
  31. ^ PennDOT (2004). Delaware County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (Map). ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_PDF_FILES/MAPS/Type_10_GHS_Historical_Scans/Delaware_2004.pdf. Retrieved January 6, 2015.
  32. ^ a b McDermott, Joe and Dan Hartzell (September 29, 2005). "Hit the bypass, Jack". The Morning Call (Allentown, PA). Retrieved January 6, 2015. 
  33. ^ a b "Route 222/Trexlertown bypass set to open today". Reading Eagle. September 28, 2007. Retrieved January 1, 2013. 
  34. ^ Walker, Wendy (March 20, 1988). "A New Bypass Is Sought - Straight Away". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved January 6, 2015. 
  35. ^ Soper, Aileen (October 6, 1997). "U. Uwchlan Board Looks Set To Adopt Landmark Land Law It Would Let Builders Put Houses Closer Together In Return For Setting Aside More Open Space.". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved January 6, 2015. 
  36. ^ Jones, Jonathan (May 13, 2002). "Orange cones litter already slow roadway". Daily Local News (West Chester, PA). Retrieved January 6, 2015. 
  37. ^ a b Upper Uwchlan Township (December 2007). Transportation Improvement Plan (Map). http://www.eagleroadwork.com/Eagle_Plan_UUT_RevisedForWebsite7_22_09.jpg. Retrieved January 6, 2015.
  38. ^ "Upper Uwchlan Township Roadwork Update Website". Upper Uwchlan Township. Retrieved January 6, 2015. 
  39. ^ a b Google, Inc. "overview of Pennsylvania Route 100 Truck". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=PA-100+N%2FKings+Hwy+N&daddr=40.5182635,-75.5262281+to:E+Main+St&hl=en&ll=40.508089,-75.535512&spn=0.028485,0.066047&sll=40.508448,-75.537357&sspn=0.028485,0.066047&geocode=FUPxaQIdJol_-w%3BFXdCagIdrI9_-yl5VkXZVyXEiTFhazcqfJvRaA%3BFbwsagIdsDR_-w&t=h&mra=ls&via=1&z=15. Retrieved March 15, 2012.
  40. ^ Lester, Patrick (November 19, 2011). "Macungie losing revenue from Route 100 truck fines". The Morning Call. Retrieved March 15, 2012. 

External links[edit]