Phil Heatley

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The Hon.
Philip Heatley
MP
Minister of Fisheries
In office
19 November 2008 – 25 February 2010
Prime Minister John Key
Preceded by Jim Anderton
Succeeded by none (Ministry merged)
Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture
In office
1 April 2010 – 14 December 2011
Prime Minister John Key
Preceded by new Ministry
Succeeded by none (Ministry merged)
Minister of Energy and Resources
In office
14 December 2011 – 29 January 2013
Prime Minister John Key
Preceded by Gerry Brownlee
Succeeded by Simon Bridges
Minister of Housing
In office
19 November 2008 – 25 February 2010
Prime Minister John Key
Preceded by Maryan Street
Succeeded by Maurice Williamson (acting)
In office
1 April 2010 – 22 January 2013
Preceded by Maurice Williamson (acting)
Succeeded by Nick Smith
Member of the New Zealand Parliament
for Whangarei
In office
16 December 1999 – 14 August 2014
Preceded by John Banks
Personal details
Born (1967-04-05) 5 April 1967 (age 47)[1]
Nationality New Zealand
Political party National Party
Occupation Agricultural engineer

Philip Reeve Heatley (born 5 April 1967) is a New Zealand politician. He is a member of the National Party. From 2008 until January 2013, he was a member of cabinet, holding the portfolios of Fisheries, Fisheries and Aquaculture, Energy and Resources, and Housing, before being replaced in a cabinet reshuffle by Prime Minister John Key. Heatley retired from Parliament in 2014.

Early years[edit]

Heatley was born in Whangarei. Before entering politics, Heatley completed a Master's degree with Honours in Horticultural Engineering at Massey University. He has undertaken short term study and work as a volunteer with an international relief agency on a hospital ship. He was an agricultural engineer in the dairy industry, surveying and designing farm buildings, land drainage and irrigation systems. He authored two published environmental engineering manuals.[2][3] He is currently a Fellow of the Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand (IPENZ).

Member of Parliament[edit]

Parliament of New Zealand
Years Term Electorate List Party
1999–2002 46th Whangarei 42 National
2002–2005 47th Whangarei 31 National
2005–2008 48th Whangarei 22 National
2008– 2011 49th Whangarei 22 National
2011–2014 50th Whangarei 15 National

From the 1999 election until his retirement at the 2014 election, he was the MP for the Whangarei electorate. In Opposition, Heatley was a member of Parliament's Primary Production Committee, Regulations Review Committee and Transport and Industrial Relations Committee and has been National's spokesman on Forestry, Fisheries, Regional Development, Early Childhood Education and Energy.

He became Minister of Housing and Minister of Fisheries in the Fifth National Government in 2008 and remained Minister of Housing and became Minister of Energy and Resources in 2011, the beginning of the Government's second term.

In 2009 he introduced the Unit Titles Bill, modernising the 1972 legislation that regulates the way apartment blocks and multi-unit developments are managed.[4] The Act came into force in April 2010. He also introduced the Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill to update existing rental laws and extend them to cover tenants in boarding houses not previously having protection.[5] The legislation was passed in 2010.

Following 'errors' found in his expense reports, he resigned all portfolio positions in February 2010.[6] He was reinstated to his ministerial portfolios the following month after a report which cleared him of any deliberate wrongdoing.[7]

In 2011 he imposed change to the way Housing New Zealand delivered state housing including introducing a 'reviewable tenancy' that put an end to a 70-year 'state house for life' principle.[8] A one year suspension period to prevent anti-social tenants from reapplying for a state house, measures to prevent fraud and a commitment to insulate every state house and resource third sector providers of social housing also came into force.[9][10]

Heatley's fisheries portfolio role was renamed from April 2010. As Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture, in 2010 Heatley introduced the Aquaculture Legislation Amendment Bill (No 3) to streamline consenting, help manage competing demand for coastal space, and to deliver on the Maori Commercial Aquaculture Settlement to iwi.[11][12] The legislation was passed in 2011. Together with then Labour Minister, Kate Wilkinson, he initiated a Ministerial Inquiry into the operation of Foreign Charter Vessels (FCVs) in New Zealand's EEZ.[13] This followed allegations of the failure of some FCVs to provide for proper crew working conditions and vessel safety standards. Heatley, as Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture, was succeeded by David Carter as Minister of Primary Industries following the 2011 post-election cabinet reshuffle. The inquiry was concluded in 2012 and the Fisheries (Foreign Charter Vessels and Other Matters) Bill was tabled later that year.

In December 2011 Heatley became Minister of Energy and Resources. In 2012 he introduced the Crown Minerals (Permitting and Crown Land) Bill amending the Crown Minerals Act 1991 to 'promote', not simply manage, exploration and production of oil, gas and mineral resources.[14][15] The legislation created a two-tiered permit system for the more complex, higher-return petroleum and mineral activities and the lower-return small business and hobby mineral operations. Amendments were also included in response to the report of the Royal Commission on the Pike River Coal Mine Tragedy.[16] The legislation was passed in 2013. In February 2012, he introduced a new 'block offer' process for awarding oil and gas exploration permit areas across New Zealand, including in its EEZ. Blocks on offer are confirmed following consultation with iwi and local authorities and a competitive tender is undertaken to finally allocate permits. This replaced a 'priority in time' process.[17][18]

In 22 January 2013 Cabinet reshuffle, Heatley lost his ministerial portfolio Energy and Resources to Simon Bridges and Housing to Nick Smith.[19]

Post-ministerial career[edit]

On 31 January 2013 Heatley was granted the right to retain the title of The Honourable for life in recognition of his term as a Member of the Executive Council of New Zealand.[20] Hon Phil Heatley was a member of the Parliament's Social Services Committee (2013–2014) and its Local Government and Environment Committee (2013–2014).[1] In early November 2013 he announced he would be retiring from politics at the 2014 general election to "move on to fresh challenges and opportunities in the private sector".[21]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Hon Phil Heatley". New Zealand Parliament. 15 February 2014. Archived from the original on 28 March 2014. Retrieved 21 October 2014. 
  2. ^ "Dairying and the Environment: Managing farm dairy effluent". DEC. 1995. 
  3. ^ "Dairying and the Environment: Farm management issues". DEC. 1998. 
  4. ^ "Unit titles bill makes management easier". Landlords. 30 June 2009. 
  5. ^ "National plans big rental law shakeup". The New Zealand Herald. 19 February 2009. 
  6. ^ "Phil Heatley's resignation statement". The New Zealand Herald. 25 February 2010. 
  7. ^ Trevett, Claire; Armstrong, John (31 March 2010). "Heatley didn't intend to deceive, says Key". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 31 March 2010. 
  8. ^ "State houses move towards a need-based philosophy". East & Bays Courier. 17 December 2010. 
  9. ^ "New unit for social housing". Stuff. 14 June 2011. 
  10. ^ "National 'strong' on state house crime". Stuff. 5 November 2011. 
  11. ^ "Aquaculture gets lift from law change". The New Zealand Herald. 22 August 2011. 
  12. ^ "Aquaculture law heralds expansion". Nelson Mail. 19 August 2011. 
  13. ^ "Fish bait for meals? Inquiry begins". The New Zealand Herald. 23 August 2011. 
  14. ^ "Government plans to make mineral exploration easier". The New Zealand Herald. 16 January 2012. 
  15. ^ "New bill amends Crown Minerals Act". Scoop. 26 September 2012. 
  16. ^ "Pike River Mine disaster". 
  17. ^ "Govt seeking oil and gas explorers". The New Zealand Herald. 10 February 2012. 
  18. ^ "Block offer 2012 awards ceremony". Scoop. 11 December 2012. 
  19. ^ "Nick Smith returns to Cabinet". The Press. 22 January 2013. Retrieved 22 January 2013. 
  20. ^ "Retention of the Title 'The Honourable'" (31 January 2013) 11 New Zealand Gazette 359 at 379.
  21. ^ "Phil Heatley to retire from politics at next election". National.org. Retrieved 5 October 2014. 

External links[edit]


New Zealand Parliament
Preceded by
John Banks
Member of Parliament for Whangarei
1999–2014
Succeeded by
Shane Reti
Political offices
Preceded by
Maryan Street
Minister of Housing
2008–2010
2010–2013
Succeeded by
Maurice Williamson (acting)
Preceded by
Maurice Williamson (acting)
Succeeded by
Nick Smith
Preceded by
Jim Anderton
Minister of Fisheries
2008–2010
Ministry merged
New title
new Ministry
Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture
2010–2011
Ministry merged
Preceded by
Gerry Brownlee
Minister of Energy and Resources
2011–2013
Succeeded by
Simon Bridges