Steven Joyce

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For those of a similar name, see Stephen Joyce (disambiguation).
The Honourable
Steven Joyce
MP
Steven Joyce.jpg
Minister for Economic Development
Incumbent
Assumed office
14 December 2011
Prime Minister John Key
Preceded by Gerry Brownlee
Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment
Incumbent
Assumed office
27 January 2010[1]
Prime Minister John Key
Preceded by Anne Tolley
Minister of Transport
In office
19 November 2008 – 14 December 2011
Prime Minister John Key
Preceded by Annette King
Succeeded by Gerry Brownlee
Minister for Communications and Information Technology
In office
19 November 2008 – 14 December 2011
Prime Minister John Key
Preceded by David Cunliffe
Succeeded by Amy Adams
Minister for Science and Innovation
Prime Minister John Key
Preceded by Wayne Mapp
Personal details
Born (1963-04-07) 7 April 1963 (age 51)
New Plymouth, Taranaki, New Zealand[2]
Nationality New Zealand
Political party National Party
Spouse(s) Suzanne
Children two
Occupation Broadcasting entrepreneur

Steven Leonard Joyce (born 7 April 1963) is a New Zealand politician, who entered the New Zealand House of Representatives in 2008 as a member of the New Zealand National Party. In the same year he became Minister of Transport and Minister for Communications and Information Technology.

As a broadcasting entrepreneur with RadioWorks he became a self-made millionaire before he entered politics.[3]

Broadcasting[edit]

Joyce's parents worked as grocers.[4] He went to school at Francis Douglas Memorial College, before enrolling at Massey University, applying to study veterinary science. However he "missed the cut",[5] graduating instead with a BSc in zoology. While at university he worked as a presenter and programme director on student radio.[6] After leaving university Joyce and a group of friends (including radio presenter Jeremy Corbett) started their own radio station, Energy FM, in New Plymouth.[5][6] With business partners, he built up RadioWorks over the next seventeen years, both organically and by acquisition, to a network of 22 radio stations and 650 staff. He retired as Managing Director of RadioWorks in April 2001, when CanWest purchased it, Joyce receiving $6 million for the sale.[6]

After RadioWorks he joined the New Zealand National Party, working as their campaign manager in both the 2005 and the 2008 general elections. He also served as CEO of Jasons Travel Media for two years until 2008.

In 2010 while Minister of Transport, Joyce admitted to two prior driving convictions, careless driving resulting in a fine in 1988, and careless driving causing injury resulting in a fine and loss of licence in 1989.[7]

Member of Parliament[edit]

Parliament of New Zealand
Years Term Electorate List Party
2008–2011 49th List 16 National
2011 – present 50th List 13 National

On 8 November 2008 Joyce was elected as a list-only candidate (ranked 16th on the party list) at the 2008 election in the Fifth National Government of New Zealand of the 49th Parliament of New Zealand representing the New Zealand National Party.

As a first term MP, Joyce was appointed to the office of the Minister of Transport and the office of the Communications and Information Technology.[8] Joyce was also appointed as a member of the Executive Council[9] and became The Hon. Steven Leonard Joyce MP.

As Minister of Transport the following changes were introduced.

  1. In November 2009 a ban on using cellphones while driving came into effect.[10]
  2. In 2010
    • New Zealand's unique right-hand rule at intersections would be reversed
    • The minimum driving age would rise from 15 to 16[11] - both measures were subject to cabinet approval and public consultation, and eventually passed into law.[12] This minimum driving age proposal was criticised by the editorial board of The New Zealand Herald for being too hesitant after experts and the public had favoured raising the driving age as high as 18 and in the opinion of the newspaper, Joyce had not shown the resolve to follow the recommendations.[13]
    • Created Auckland Transport as a council-controlled organisation for the 'super city' of Auckland. Joyce stated that "Auckland will need a good agency focused on delivering the projects that have been agreed by council" and noting that Council had a number of ways of ensuring that the entity was accountable.[14]

Joyce was also appointed to the Office of Minister for Tertiary Education,[15] replacing Anne Tolley, effective 27 January 2010.

In the 2011 election for the 50th New Zealand Parliament Joyce retained his seat in Parliament (as a list candidate, now rated 13th on the party list) and was appointed to the office of the Minister for Economic Development, Minister of Science and Innovation, and Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment[16] in the Fifth National Government of New Zealand. His previous role as Minister of Transport[17] passed to Gerry Brownlee.

In May 2013 Joyce signed a deal with casino Skycity Auckland, allowing it to install an additional 230 pokie machines and 40 new gambling tables, in exchange for building a $402 million convention centre.[18][19]

He is known as the "Minister of Everything" or "Mr Fixit"; he is currently (August 2013) responsible for investigating both the Novopay debacle and the 2013 Fonterra recall. [20]

Private life[edit]

Joyce lives in Albany in the north of Auckland with his wife Suzanne and their two children, on a seven-acre lifestyle block.[2][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "John Key announces Cabinet reshuffle". The New Zealand Herald. 26 January 2010. Retrieved 26 January 2010. 
  2. ^ a b Young, Audrey (2010-03-20). "Steven Joyce becomes Govt's 'everywhere man'". New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 2010-03-20. 
  3. ^ Gower, Patrick (3 October 2009). "Key lieutenant makes most of a fast start". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 11 March 2010. 
  4. ^ "Former campaign boss the bolter in Key's Cabinet". New Zealand Herald. 17 November 2008. Retrieved 2009-01-21. 
  5. ^ a b c Roughan, John (16 October 2008). "A word with... Steven Joyce". New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 2009-01-21. 
  6. ^ a b c Dudding, Adam (16 November 2008). "Key's six million dollar man - Steven Joyce". Sunday Star Times. Archived from the original on 2009-01-21. Retrieved 2009-01-21. 
  7. ^ Bennett, Adam (16 September 2010). "Minister admits driving offences". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 24 September 2010. 
  8. ^ "Appointment of Ministers" (21 November 2008) 179 New Zealand Gazette 4635.
  9. ^ "Members of Executive Council Appointed" (21 November 2008) 179 New Zealand Gazette 4634.
  10. ^ Williams, David (14 August 2009). "Cellphone ban comes with fines". The Press. Retrieved 10 March 2010. 
  11. ^ "NZ's right-hand rule set for change". The New Zealand Herald. 3 March 2010. Retrieved 10 March 2010. 
  12. ^ "Safer Journeys, First Actions". Wellington: Ministry of Transport. March 2010. Retrieved 11 March 2010. 
  13. ^ "Editorial: Cabinet keeps to slow lane on driving age". The New Zealand Herald. 3 March 2010. Retrieved 10 March 2010. 
  14. ^ Orsman, Bernard (11 March 2010). "Joyce adamant on city transport giant". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 11 March 2010. 
  15. ^ "Appointment of Ministers", (27 January 2010) 5 New Zealand Gazette 221.
  16. ^ "Vice Regal: Appointment of Ministers" (15 December 2011) 193 New Zealand Gazette 5651.
  17. ^ "Resignation of Ministers" (14 December 2011) 193 New Zealand Gazette 5650.
  18. ^ "SkyCity convention centre set to create 800 jobs - Joyce". TV NZ. 13 May 2013. 
  19. ^ "SkyCity's pokie full house". Stuff.co.nz. 13 May 2013. 
  20. ^ Espiner, Colin (7 August 2013). "Mr Fixit in charge of dairy scare". Stuff/Fairfax. Retrieved 11 August 2013. 

External links[edit]


Political offices
Preceded by
Annette King
Minister of Transport
2008 – 2011
Succeeded by
Gerry Brownlee
Preceded by
David Cunliffe
Minister for Communications and Information Technology
2008 – 2011
Succeeded by
Amy Adams
Preceded by
Anne Tolley
Minister for Tertiary Education
2010 – 2011
Title abolished
New title Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment
2011 –
Incumbent
New title Minister for Science and Innovation
2011 –
Preceded by
Gerry Brownlee
Minister for Economic Development
2011 –