Psychiatric Studies

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Psychiatric Studies is Volume 1 in The Collected Works of C. G. Jung, a series of books published by Princeton University Press in the U.S. and Routledge & Kegan Paul in the U.K. It contains papers published in German between 1902 and 1905, translated by R.F.C. Hull and edited by Sir Herbert Read, Michael Fordham and Gerhard Adler. The papers focus on descriptive and experimental psychiatry from Jung's early days in medical practice. They show the influence on Jung of Eugen Bleuler and Pierre Janet.[1][2]

The book begins with Jung's doctoral dissertation On the Psychology and Pathology of So-Called Occult Phenomena, a case study of an adolescent girl who claimed to be a psychic medium. It also includes papers on cryptomnesia, Freudian slips in reading, simulated insanity, and other subjects,[2] and discusses some conditions of inferiority and altered states of consciousness which were previously thought to be occult phenomena. Included are case studies of sleepwalkers and patients who suffered from hypomania.[3]

Extensive detailed abstracts of each chapter are available online.[3]

See also[edit]

Carl Jung

References[edit]

  • Jung, C.G. (1970). Psychiatric Studies, Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Volume 1, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-1-400-85090-7
  • Jung, C.G. (1957). Psychiatric Studies, 2nd Edition, Collected Works of C. G. Jung, London: Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-09896-0
  1. ^ "Collected Works of C.G. Jung, Volume 1: Psychiatric Studies". Princeton University Press. Retrieved 2014-01-15. 
  2. ^ a b "Collected Works of C.G. Jung". (Click on this book's title to see the details). Routledge. Retrieved 2014-01-17. 
  3. ^ a b "Abstracts: Vol 1: Psychiatric Studies". International Association for Analytic Psychology. Retrieved 2014-01-15.