Stone v. Graham

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Stone v. Graham
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Decided November 17, 1980
Full case name Sydell Stone, et al. v. James B. Graham, Superintendent of Public Instruction of Kentucky
Citations 449 U.S. 39 (more)
101 S. Ct. 192; 66 L. Ed. 2d 199; 1980 U.S. LEXIS 2; 49 U.S.L.W. 3369
Holding
A Kentucky statute requiring the posting of a copy of the Ten Commandments, purchased with private contributions, on the wall of each public classroom in the State is unconstitutional because it lacks a secular legislative purpose.
Court membership
Case opinions
Per curiam.
Dissent Rehnquist

In Stone v. Graham, 449 U.S. 39 (1980), the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that a Kentucky statute was unconstitutional and in violation of the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment, because it lacked a nonreligious, legislative purpose. The statute requires the posting of a copy of the Ten Commandments on the wall of each public classroom in the state. While the copies of the Ten Commandments were purchased with private funding, the court ruled that because they were being placed in public classrooms they were in violation of the First Amendment.



See also[edit]

External links[edit]

  • Text of Stone v. Graham, 449 U.S. 39 (1980) is available from:  Findlaw  Justia