Talk:List of fictional universes in film and television

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Suggestion[edit]

If and when anyone feels up to it, the list could probably be split into two sections (one for TV, one for Film) Ncboy2010 (talk) 15:11, 11 February 2012 (UTC)

Nonsense[edit]

Just because a show contains fictional characters and fictional storylines does not mean it is set in a fictional universe. Most stories ever writtena re set in the universe. dictionary.com defines universe as:

u·ni·verse [yoo-nuh-vurs] Show IPA noun 1. the totality of known or supposed objects and phenomena throughout space; the cosmos; macrocosm. 2. the whole world, especially with reference to humanity: a truth known throughout the universe. 3. a world or sphere in which something exists or prevails: his private universe. 4. Also called universe of discourse. Logic. the aggregate of all the objects, attributes, and relations assumed or implied in a given discussion. 5. Also called universal set. Mathematics . the set of all elements under discussion for a given problem.

So, having millions of "fictional universes" is wrong on multiple levels.

Even so, given a well-known example. In Star Trek(TOS) a remark was made that NASA's first shuttle was called 'Enterprise'. This was of course before NASA even had a shuttle. In the 70's NASA prepared to send their first shuttle into space. Only it wasn't going to be called 'Enterprise'. Trek fans wrote countless thousands of letters, some rather frantic, to NASA asking/requesting/demanding that the shuttle be renamed 'Enterprise', which it was. Now, if Star Trek was supposed to be set in a "fictional universe" called "the Star Trek Universe", why would it have mattered that NASA's shuttle and the one mentioned in TOS had different names? Why do fans come up with theories stating that the various conflicts ion the 1990's were actually part of a worldwide struggle led by the behind-the-scenes manipulator Khan Noonien Singh, and the truth about this War will only be revealed when documents are declassified later this century? Again, if Trek was always supposed to be set in a "fictional universe", what difference would it make?.....Why also would Doctor Who create a story of pure continuity like Attack of the Cybermen? In case you didn't know. the 1966 Doctor Who story The Tenth Planet had Earth being invaded, very visibly and shown on television, by Cybermen in 1986(then 20 years in the future). However, the 1985 story Attack of the Cybermen has time travellers effectively removing the 1986 invasion from history a year before it happens. Why go to that level of continuity if the 1986 shown in The Tenth Planet was always supposed to be taking place in a "fictional universe" called "the Doctor Who Universe" or the even-more-nausea-inducing "the Whoniverse"?

The fact is, certain shows, comics, franchises etc. may well deliberately state that their stories are taking place in "fictional universes". However, that most certainly does not mean that all fiction takes place in these "fictional universes". This article is completely unsourced, and features enormous OR. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 41.132.49.148 (talk) 06:44, 28 February 2014 (UTC)

The given reference is absurd. In the Doctor Who universe, a spaceship crashed into London, and aliens kill the Prime Minister. Two different fictional characters occupy the position, including an evil alien. Multiple things that have happened and not been redacted by time travel have appeared throughout the series. Yes, certain events have been brought into line with reality. But a lot of things haven't.

I think for the purposes of this article, if it's to exist at all, it should refer strictly to universes in which multiple stories occur. Like, Doctor Who has Sarah Jane Adventures and Torchwood, numerous books, radio, etc. That's plausibly an entire 'universe' existing outside our own. I'm not sure the same can be said for Fringe or Carnivale - although the world is different, it's really more of a fictional setting. 08:58, 26 June 2014 (UTC) — Preceding unsigned comment added by 96.246.246.28 (talk)