Talk:Weather front

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Good article Weather front has been listed as one of the Natural sciences good articles under the good article criteria. If you can improve it further, please do so. If it no longer meets these criteria, you can reassess it.
WikiProject Non-tropical storms (Rated GA-class, High-importance)
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WikiProject Meteorology (Rated GA-class, High-importance)
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Psychological Effects[edit]

Some individuals hace psychological effects (myself including) when fronts are near their area. Some people feel anxious and fidgity while others may be depressed or tired. I usually feel anxious and sometimes get fidgity and restless especially when a thunderstorm is coming. There should be a section about this added —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.118.146.222 (talk) 01:46, 2 May 2008 (UTC)

Why do cold fronts move from west to east?[edit]

~~reader

The Coriolis effect, I believe.

~[[arias]][[of]][[dark]] —Preceding comment was added at 16:16, 10 March 2008 (UTC)

Creation of article[edit]

This article was created when it was realized that it was taking too prominent of a role in surface weather analysis, and that the previous article would flow better if this was its subarticle. Since its previous article was GA, I nominated this one for GA. Thegreatdr 17:54, 6 May 2007 (UTC)

First sentence[edit]

The first sentence needs some work. The current version is "Fronts in meteorology are the leading edges of air masses with different density (e.g., air temperature and/or humidity)." Something along the lines of: "A weather front is the interface of two air masses of different density. The air masses generally differ in temperature and may also differ in humidity." might work. Cheers. HausTalk 01:22, 13 May 2007 (UTC)

I like the wording change proposed. The change has been made. Thegreatdr 13:03, 17 May 2007 (UTC)

GA on hold: Notes for fixes[edit]

Well, since I did the peer review for the parent article, I thought it might be germaine to do the GA review for this one. Hope you don't mind. Some ideas needed to fix this one up:

  1. It looks like this article was forked from the Surface weather analysis article BEFORE many of the fixes that were done at Peer Review. Rather than rehash them here, you might want to go and bring over the fixed up version. Much of the fixes made there are still needed here. For one example, the Occluded Front section still uses the ambiguous "curves up" description.
  2. The lead needs real work.
    1. First of all, bold the name of the article the first time it appears.
    2. Secondly, the lead doesn't really summarize the article. See WP:LEAD for some help with this. Basically, each section in an article of this size probably merits a summary sentance in the lead. The lead as it stands right now makes a good first paragraph, and I wouldn't lose much from it, but consider a second paragraph where you lay out the definitions of each kind of front. The lead should be more than just an abstract, it should be an "article in minature" that could stand alone as a work by itself.
    3. Consider adding a bit explaining the southern hemisphere as well, even if only to indicate that it is the exact opposite of the northern. Our Aussie friends will appreciate it.
  3. A few more wikilinks may be in order, especially where they would lead to articles that would help expand points in the article. "Low pressure system" is one example. "Stratiform" is another example from the Peer Review (see #1 above). "Surface analysis" probably needs a wikilink as well, considering it is the parent article! I would even add a line into the lead about it as well, since frontal analysis is a HUGE part of an SWA.

I have every confidence that this article will improve to be GA level soon. My experience is that the main editor has been quite responsive. If you have any questions, or seek a final review, drop a line by my talk page. --Jayron32|talk|contribs 01:52, 25 May 2007 (UTC)

I believe the changes have now been made. Let me know if I missed something. Thegreatdr 13:46, 26 May 2007 (UTC)
I made some tweaks myself, just minor copyediting for clarity. This is now GA ready. I am listing it. Good job! --Jayron32|talk|contribs 18:47, 26 May 2007 (UTC)

History section[edit]

I believe there should be a brief one, maybe mentioning something about the Norwegian Cyclone model for storms and how it was not recognized widely for a long time, in spite of it being correct. -RunningOnBrains 02:01, 13 June 2007 (UTC)

I added it to the see also section, but I don't want this article to be exactly the same as Surface weather analysis. Thegreatdr 19:38, 22 June 2007 (UTC)

Singular title[edit]

The article name must be in singular form, according to Wikipedia:Naming conventions#Prefer singular nouns. There's no particular reason for this to be pluralized. The lead sentence would make perfect sense if it started with "a weather front lies at the interface of two air masses...". Michael Z. 2007-07-05 01:45 Z

Tropical waves are not fronts[edit]

While they may be mentioned somewhere within the body of the article to distinguish them, the passage I'm deleting doesn't belong in the intro where there's an implication that they are fronts. Tmangray 18:40, 18 October 2007 (UTC)

The problem is, on the Unified Surface Analysis, TPC considers them synoptic scale features, and therefore a type of front. For whatever reason, they do not consider tropical cyclones or tropical waves mesoscale, even though they really are. The passage concerning tropical waves needs to be reverted. Thegreatdr (talk) 16:17, 28 November 2007 (UTC)

Cold and occluded fronts[edit]

"Cold and occluded fronts generally move from west to east" Does this statement apply througout the entire world, or just certain latitudes? Janeaz (talk) 16:31, 30 January 2008 (UTC)

To my knowlegde, that applies to the entire world. Juliancolton (talk) 17:11, 30 January 2008 (UTC)

GA Sweeps Review: Pass[edit]

As part of the WikiProject Good Articles, we're doing sweeps to go over all of the current GAs and see if they still meet the GA criteria. I'm specifically going over all of the "Meteorology and atmospheric sciences" articles. I believe the article currently meets the criteria and should remain listed as a Good article. Altogether the article is well-written and is still in great shape after its passing in 2007. Continue to improve the article making sure all new information is properly sourced and neutral. If you have any questions, let me know on my talk page and I'll get back to you as soon as I can. I have updated the article history to reflect this review. Happy editing! --Nehrams2020 (talk) 01:09, 14 March 2008 (UTC)

Images[edit]

I have created cold and warm front images in SVG by hand. If you see anything that needs to be tweaked in them drop me a message. -Ravedave (talk) 13:54, 2 April 2008 (UTC)

Tropical waves?[edit]

Why is there a section on tropical waves in an article on fronts? -Atmoz (talk) 01:21, 5 November 2009 (UTC)

Because of reference 2, which is due to TPC's insistence that they don't analyze mesoscale features on their surface analyses. Don't get me started on that. Thegreatdr (talk) 02:06, 5 November 2009 (UTC)
Sorry, but I don't understand. Are you saying that TPC (whatever that is) says that tropical waves are fronts? -Atmoz (talk) 02:20, 5 November 2009 (UTC)
They say they are synoptic in scale, similar to fronts. TPC is the Tropical Prediction Center, the parent agency of the National Hurricane Center. Thegreatdr (talk) 00:39, 7 November 2009 (UTC)

Anafront[edit]

Nothing on anafronts? The weather forecaster on my local radio station just mentioned one is coming and suggested Googling the term. Surprised WP has no mention of it. Qwfp (talk) 07:55, 24 November 2009 (UTC)

It does now. Thanks for the input. Thegreatdr (talk) 15:14, 17 December 2010 (UTC)

Which weather front brings the most severe weather?[edit]

    Although many websites agree the cold front brings the most severe weather, I disagree. Cold fronts bring 

low temperatures and precipitaion for a short amount of time, but a stationary front brings the same affects over a long period of time. Please give me your comments on the matter. Saisai514 (talk) 21:08, 6 March 2011 (UTC)Saisai51:

Squall lines can form along cold fronts, before riding out ahead of the boundaries into the warm sector of extratropical cyclones. Tornadoes are more frequent with supercell thunderstorms which main form along warm fronts. Stationary fronts can be the focus of heavy rains, particularly if the stationary front is the polar front at the leading edge of the Westerlies. It depends what you mean exactly by severe weather. Thegreatdr (talk) 22:54, 6 March 2011 (UTC)