Tony Doyle (cyclist)

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Tony Doyle
MBE
Personal information
Full name Anthony Doyle
Born (1958-05-19)19 May 1958
 England
 United Kingdom
Height 6'1"
Team information
Discipline Track & Road
Role Rider
Rider type Six-day
Professional team(s)
1980–1982
1984
1985
1986
1989
1990
1991
1993
1994
KP Crisps - Viscount (GBR)
RMC - Security Grille Protections (GBR)
RMC - Ammaco (Great-Britain
Ever Ready - Ammaco (Great-Britain)
Ever Ready (Great-Britain)
Ever Ready - Halfords [1]
European Newspaper (Great-Britain)
Neilson Tivoli (Great Britain)
Futurama (Great Britain)
Major wins
Arc en ciel.svg World Champion, Pursuit (1980 & 1986), European Madison Champion (1984, 1988 & 1989) European Omnium Champion (1988/89)
Infobox last updated on
13 June 2013

Anthony Doyle MBE (born Ashford, Middlesex, England, 19 May 1958)[2] is a British former professional cyclist.

Biography[edit]

Doyle was world pursuit champion in 1980 and 1986. He was a professional between 1980 and 1995, riding for British teams.

Doyle won bronze in the individual and team pursuits at the 1978 Commonwealth Games. He finished seventh in the team pursuit at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow as part of the British team.[3] He was not selected for the individual pursuit even though he was the national champion. The place went to Sean Yates. As a result Doyle turned professional and won the world professional pursuit championship, beating Bert Oosterbosch and Herman Ponsteen. He then raced six-day track races with a variety of partners before achieving great results partnering the Australian Danny Clark.

Doyle became a regular in six-day track races during the 1980s, winning 23 six days. As a result he was and still is Britain's most successful six day rider. He was noted for fluid and rapid pedalling, which brought him an unofficial UK time-trial record for 25 miles on a 72-inch fixed gear in 56m 30s.

In 1989 Tony Doyle suffered from a serious head injury and multiple fractures at the Munich Six day. He was given the last rites and was in a coma for ten days. He spent six weeks in ITU, followed by two months in a rehabilitation centre. Due to the extent of his injuries it was predicted that he would be unable to return to professional racing.[citation needed]

Doyle received the Bidlake Memorial Prize in 1980 following his first world championship.[4] He received an MBE for services to cycling in 1989.

He took silver in the team pursuit at the 1994 Commonwealth Games in Victoria, Canada. Unfortunately, a broken back as a result of a crash at the Six Day in Zurich ended his professional career. After, he remained in sport and in particular cycling. Tony became President of the British Cycling Federation in 1996. He was the founder director of the Tour of Britain which restarted in 1994.[5] In 2009, he was inducted into the British Cycling Hall of Fame.[6] Tony Doyle is currently Chairman of the Olympic Delivery Board for the London Borough of Southwark.

His son George, was born in 1992. Daughter Gemma, was born in 1995 and his youngest son James was born in 1999.

Palmarès[edit]

Track[edit]

1980
1st Arc en ciel.svg UCI Track Cycling World Championships - Men's Individual Pursuit
1981
1st British Pursuit Champion
1983
1st Berlin, Six Days (GER)
1st Dortmund, Six Days (GER)
1984
2nd UCI Track Cycling World Championships - Men's Individual Pursuit
1st European Union Madison, European Track Championships (with Gary Wiggins)
1985
2nd UCI Track Cycling World Championships - Men's Individual Pursuit
1st Bremen, Six Days (GER) (with Gary Wiggins)
1st Maastricht, Six Days (NL) with Danny Clark
2nd Madison, European Track Championships (with Gary Wiggins)
1986
1st Arc en ciel.svg UCI Track Cycling World Championships - Men's Individual Pursuit
1st Six Days of Ghent (with Danny Clark)
1st Berlin, Six Days (GER) with Danny Clark)
1st Dortmund, Six Days (GER) with Danny Clark)
1st Grenoble, Six Days (FRA) with Francesco Moser
1987
2nd UCI Track Cycling World Championships - Men's Points Race
3rd UCI Track Cycling World Championships - Men's Individual Pursuit
1st Maastricht, Six Days (NL) with Danny Clark)
1st Copenhagen, Six Days (DEN) with Danny Clark)
1st Bassano Del Grappa, Six Days (ITA)
1st Bremen, Six Days (GER) with Danny Clark)
1st Paris, Six Days (FRA) with Danny Clark)
1988
2nd UCI Track Cycling World Championships - Men's Individual Pursuit
1st Munster (GER), Six Days with Danny Clark)
1st Berlin (GER), Six Days with Danny Clark)
1st Dortmund (GER), Six Days with Danny Clark)
1st Munich (GER), Six Days with Danny Clark)
1st Launceston (AUS), Six Days with Danny Clark)
1st Copenhagen (GER), Six Days with Danny Clark)
1st Rotterdam (NL), Six Days with Danny Clark)
1989
1st Cologne (GER), Six Days with Danny Clark)
1990
1st Munich (GER), Six Days with Danny Clark)
1991
1st Six Days of Ghent (with Etienne De Wilde)
1994

2nd Commonwealth Games Victoria, Canada Team Pursuit

Road[edit]

1976
2nd National junior road race series[7]
1977
1st Manchester-Rhyl Stage Race
1979
2nd Overall, Circuit des Ardennes
1st 13 times in French Road Races
1980
1st 4 times in French Road Races
1981
1st Overall, Girvan Three Day
1982
1st Overall, Girvan Three Day
1983
1st Kelloggs Nottingham City Centre
1st Stage 5, Sealink International
2nd Prologue, Milk Race, Bournemouth
2nd Stage 2, Milk Race, Coventry
2nd Stage 6b, Milk Race, Burntwood
3rd Stage 10, Milk Race, Middlesbrough
1984
1st Stage 3, Sealink International
2nd Overall, Sealink International
1986
1st Overall, Ron Kitching Classic
1st Stage 1
1st Stage 5, Sealink International
1st Kelloggs Westminster City Centre
2nd Stage 3b, Tour of Ireland, Cork
1989
1st Stage 8, Milk Race, Harrogate
1992
3rd Tom Simpson Memorial RR
1993
1st Stage 3, Ras Stage Race
1994
1st Victor Belmont Road Race

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Anthony (Tony) Doyle". Cycling Website. 
  2. ^ "Anthony Doyle MBE". British Olympic Association. 
  3. ^ "Tony Doyle Biography & Statistics". Sports Reference. Retrieved 2012-07-27. 
  4. ^ "The Recipients since 1933 when the Trust was formed". The F. T. Bidlake Memorial Trust. 
  5. ^ "Tony Doyle". British Cycling. September 2004. ). In 2007 Tony was part of the winning bid team to host the Grande Depart of the Tour De France in London.
  6. ^ "50 Cycling Heroes Named in British Cycling's Hall of Fame". British Cycling. 2009-12-17. 
  7. ^ "Junior National Series Winners". British Cycling. Retrieved 2008-12-18. [dead link]

External links[edit]