Triplegia

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Not to be confused with Spastic triplegia.

Triplegia is a medical condition characterized by the paralysis of three limbs (Triplegia Muscle Anatomy) . A person with triplegia can be referred to as triplegic. While there is no typical pattern of involvement, it is usually associated with paralysis of both legs and one arm — but can also involve both arms and one leg.[1] Triplegia can sometimes by considered a combination of hemiplegia (paralysis of arm and leg of one side of the body) overlaying diplegia (paralysis of both legs), or as quadriplegia (paralysis of four limbs) with less involvement in one extremity.[1]

The condition is commonly associated with cerebral palsy, although conditions such as stroke can also lead to it. Triplegia has also been found to be due to an increase in intracranial pressure associated with hydrocephalus resulting from traumatic brain injury [2]

A similar condition is triparesis, in which the patient suffers from paresis in three limbs, meaning that the limbs are very weak, but not completely paralyzed.

In a case reported only due to is rarity, triplegia was reported following a tonsillectomy (surgical removal of the tonsils). An eight year-old male patient was sent to Willard Parker Hospital on August 12, 1929 and had been diagnosed with poliomyelitis. After an unrelated, and routine, tonsillectomy there was complete flaccid paralysis and loss of feeling in both the legs, right arm, and muscles in the trunk.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Miller, F; Backrach SJ (1995). ". Cerebral Palsy: A Complete Guide for Caregiving". Johns Hopkins University Press: 433. 
  2. ^ Sheffler, LR; Ito VY; Philip PA; Sahgal V (1994). "Shunting in chronic post-traumatic hydrocephalus: demonstration of neurophysiologic improvement". Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 75 (3): 338–341. doi:10.1016/0003-9993(94)90039-6. PMID 8129589. 
  3. ^ Brahdy, B (1935). ". TRIPLEGIA FOLLOWING TONSILLECTOMY". Am J Dis Child. 49 (3): 716–721. 

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