Typhoon Utor

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This article is about the 2013 typhoon. For other storms of the same name, see Typhoon Utor (disambiguation).
This article is about the 2013 typhoon. For other storms of the same name, see Typhoon Labuyo (disambiguation).
Typhoon Utor (Labuyo)
Typhoon (JMA scale)
Category 4 (Saffir–Simpson scale)
Utor 2013-08-11 0515Z.jpg
Typhoon Utor shortly before peak intensity on August 11, 2013
Formed August 8, 2013 (2013-08-08)
Dissipated August 18, 2013 (2013-08-18)
Highest winds 10-minute sustained: 195 km/h (120 mph)
1-minute sustained: 240 km/h (150 mph)
Lowest pressure 925 mbar (hPa); 27.32 inHg
Fatalities 97 total[1]
Damage $2.6 billion (2013 USD)
Areas affected
Part of the 2013 Pacific typhoon season

Typhoon Utor, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Labuyo, was the 15th depression and the 2nd typhoon in the 2013 typhoon season.

It was a powerful tropical cyclone which struck the Philippines and southern China. Developing into a tropical storm on August 9, Utor soon underwent explosive intensification and became a typhoon within a half of day. After making landfall over Luzon late on August 11, the typhoon re-emerged in the South China Sea, and it ultimately made its second landfall over Guangdong, China on August 14.

Meteorological history[edit]

Map plotting the track and intensity of the storm according to the Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale

Early on August 8, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) reported that a tropical disturbance had developed north of Yap.[2] During that day, the system moved westwards and consolidated within a favourable environment of weak vertical wind shear and strong outflow, which was enhanced by a TUTT Cell located to the northwest of the disturbance.[3][4] As a result, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), JTWC and PAGASA upgraded the system to a tropical depression 11W north of Palau, with the latter naming it Labuyo as it approached the Philippine Area of Responsibility.[5][6][7] During the next day, JTWC and JMA upgraded the system to a tropical storm, with the latter naming it as Utor (1311).[5][8] Shortly thereafter, Utor began undergoing explosive intensification, achieving typhoon status early on August 10, as an eye developed.[9]

On August 11, under the influence of low vertical wind shear, very favourable poleward and westward outflow, and warm sea surface temperature, Utor began to intensify more and formed a clear eye.[10] At 12:00 UTC, Typhoon Utor attained peak intensity by the ten-minute maximum sustained winds reaching 105 knots (195 km/h, 105 mph) and the atmospheric pressure decreasing to 925 hPa (27.3 inHg). The system became exceptionally symmetrical, as the convective bands had further deepened and wrapped tighter around a 13 nautical miles (24 km; 15 mi) pin-hole eye, prompting JTWC upgrading Utor to a super typhoon.[11] Due to land interaction with Luzon, the pin-hole eye filled in quickly; as a result, JTWC downgraded Utor to a typhoon at 18:00 UTC.[12] Tracking along the southern periphery of a subtropical ridge to the north, Utor made landfall over northern Luzon around 19:00 UTC (03:00 PHT on August 12).[13]

Typhoon Utor approaching Guangdong, China on August 14

Owing to peaks of western Luzon, Utor significantly weakened as the deep convection became disorganised. Early on August 12, Utor arrived at the South China Sea, where the environment southwest of an anticyclone was favourable with diffluence aloft, light vertical wind shear and excellent radial outflow.[14] Although a ragged eye had formed later that day, the typhoon did not restrengthen further when tracking along the southern periphery of a subtropical ridge.[15] On August 13, the eye of Utor had become well-defined on the visible satellite imagery, but the intensity and structure remained when the system was tracking northwestward.[16] At 07:50 UTC (15:50 CST) on August 14, Utor made landfall over Yangjiang in Guangdong, China as a minimal typhoon.[17] At 12:00 UTC, JMA downgraded Utor to a severe tropical storm, shortly before JTWC issued a final warning to the rapidly weakening system due to land interaction.[18] Later, Utor weakened into a tropical storm overland, and JMA downgraded the system into a tropical depression at noon on August 15. However, the remnants began tracking very slowly in Guangxi, until the tropical depression finally dissipated on August 18.[5]

Preparations and impact[edit]

Philippines[edit]

Animated enhanced infrared satellite loop of Typhoon Utor from peak intensity to landfall in the Philippines

Ahead of Utor affecting the Philippines, PAGASA issued various tropical cyclone signals for Luzon and Visayas, including signal 3 for the provinces of Aurora and Isabela and signal 1 for Metro Manila. [20] As Utor approached Central Luzon, a Malacanang Palace spokesperson called that local government to prepare and evacuate residents living near slopes, mountains and sea.[21] Thirty-two provinces in Luzon and Manila had been placed under signal warnings.[22] In Isabela, 67 families were evacuated before landfall. Under the anticipation of a direct hit, the local Pangasinan government placed the entire province on red alert. On August 11, the governor announced the suspension of classes from pre-school to tertiary level. Government and private offices were also suspended. Rescue equipment and rubber boats had also been placed in the disaster risk area of the province.[23] In the said regions, the government advised all to not engage on water sports or rough seas due to the anticipated rough seas. [24]

Utor made its landfall in Casiguran, Aurora at 3 AM (local time) on August 12. Power lines and telecommunications went down and many houses were destroyed.[25] In Nueva Vizcaya, heavy rainfall had been recorded. Some residents in the said province were forced to evacuate due to flooding. Moreover, the Magat River in the province reached the critical level, resulting in the partial opening of four gates in a dam. Electricity was also out in the province. One man died on Baguio City after he had been buried alive after a mudslide hit his home. In Isabela, more than 100 families had been affected by Utor. About 200 million pesos in agriculture was blamed on Utor in Isabela alone. Around 1,000 residents in the central Bicol region spent the night in shelters, and 23 fishermen who were out at sea failed to return home in four towns in Catanduanes province.[26] Some cars in North Luzon Expressway used hazard signals as roads were nearly impossible to see. Intense rainfall throughout the day had been recorded in Zambales, which created flash flooding in low lying areas. The major river on the province then overflowed, flooding homes. The flood is expected to get higher as high tide is expected in the morning.[27] At least 700 passengers were stranded in the ports of Albay, Catanduanes, Sorsogon and Samar. Additionally, 10 flights had also been canceled as Utor brought intense rainfall in many parts of Luzon.[28]

Throughout the Philippines, at least ten people were killed while four others were listed as missing. A total of 398,813 people were affected by the typhoon, roughly a third of whom were displaced from their homes. Significant infrastructural damage took place with 2,565 homes destroyed and 18,090 more damaged. Losses from Utor amounted to 1.08 billion (US$24.8 million), the majority resulting from agricultural damage.[29]

China[edit]

Typhoon Utor over Hong Kong on 14 August

The Chinese bulk carrier Trans Summer sank some 45 nautical miles (83 km; 52 mi) southwest of Hong Kong after having been caught in the typhoon. Twenty-one members of the crew were saved.[30]

Widespread damage took place in Guangdong Province where at least four people were killed and four others were listed missing. An estimated 109 million people were affected, 16.15 million of whom were temporarily relocated due to the threat of flooding. Typhoon-force winds caused a belt factory in Dongguan to collapse, killing 1 person and injuring 17 others.[31] Losses across the province amounted to ¥13.4 billion (US$2.2 billion).[32] Six people were killed in Guangxi Province while nearly 100 million were affected. Losses in the province reached ¥382 million (US$62.4 million).[33] Prolonged heavy rains in Hunan Province triggered widespread flooding that caused substantial damage. At least five people were killed and five others were listed missing while 96.46 million people were affected by the storm.[34]

Following the storm, prices of vegetables were raised by an average of one percent in Guangzhou, while the price of leafy vegetables were raised by as much as 15 percent.[31]

Retirement[edit]

PAGASA announced that the name Labuyo, would be retired from its naming lists after it had caused over PHP1 billion in damages.[35][36] PAGASA chose the name Lannie to replace Labuyo for the 2017 season.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Total damages figure includes agriculture, infrastructure, casualties, etc. damages.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Member Report: China". 
  2. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center (August 8, 2013). "Significant Tropical Weather Advisory for the Western and South Pacific Oceans August 8, 2013 06z". United States Navy, United States Air Force. Archived from the original on August 9, 2013. Retrieved August 11, 2013. 
  3. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center (August 8, 2013). "Significant Tropical Weather Advisory for the Western and South Pacific Oceans August 8, 2013 13z". United States Navy, United States Air Force. Archived from the original on August 9, 2013. Retrieved August 11, 2013. 
  4. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center (August 8, 2013). "Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert August 8, 2013 16z". United States Navy, United States Air Force. Archived from the original on August 9, 2013. Retrieved August 11, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c RSMC Tokyo — Typhoon Center (September 10, 2013). Typhoon Utor (RSMC Tropical Cyclone Best Track). Japan Meteorological Agency. Archived from the original on September 15, 2013. http://www.wis-jma.go.jp/cms/warning/2013/09/10/typhoon-best-track-2013-09-10t060000z/. Retrieved September 10, 2013.
  6. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center (August 8, 2013). "Prognostic Reasoning for Tropical Depression 11W Warning NR 001 August 8, 2013 21z". United States Navy, United States Air Force. Retrieved August 11, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Tropical Cyclone Alert: Tropical Depression "Labuyo" August 8, 21z". Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration. Archived from the original on August 9, 2013. 
  8. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center (August 9, 2013). "Prognostic Reasoning for Tropical Storm 11W Warning NR 005 August 9, 2013 21z". United States Navy, United States Air Force. Archived from the original on August 9, 2013. Retrieved August 11, 2013. 
  9. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. "Prognostic Reasoning for Typhoon 11W (Utor) Warning Nr 07". United States Navy, United States Air Force. Archived from the original on August 10, 2013. Retrieved August 16, 2013. 
  10. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. "PROGNOSTIC REASONING FOR TYPHOON 11W (UTOR) WARNING NR 11". United States Navy, United States Air Force. Archived from the original on 11 August 2013. Retrieved 16 August 2013. 
  11. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. "PROGNOSTIC REASONING FOR SUPER TYPHOON 11W (UTOR) WARNING NR 12". United States Navy, United States Air Force. Archived from the original on 11 August 2013. Retrieved 16 August 2013. 
  12. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. "PROGNOSTIC REASONING FOR TYPHOON 11W (UTOR) WARNING NR 13". United States Navy, United States Air Force. Archived from the original on 11 August 2013. Retrieved 16 August 2013. 
  13. ^ "23 missing as Typhoon Utor hits Philippines". New Zealand Herald. August 12, 2013. Retrieved 16 August 2013. 
  14. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. "PROGNOSTIC REASONING FOR TYPHOON 11W (UTOR) WARNING NR 14". United States Navy, United States Air Force. Archived from the original on 12 August 2013. Retrieved 15 September 2013. 
  15. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. "PROGNOSTIC REASONING FOR TYPHOON 11W (UTOR) WARNING NR 16". United States Navy, United States Air Force. Archived from the original on 12 August 2013. Retrieved 15 September 2013. 
  16. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. "PROGNOSTIC REASONING FOR TYPHOON 11W (UTOR) WARNING NR 19". United States Navy, United States Air Force. Archived from the original on 13 August 2013. Retrieved 15 September 2013. 
  17. ^ 强台风“尤特”在广东阳江登陆 海南风雨逐渐减弱 (in Chinese). Xinhua News Agency. 14 August 2013. Retrieved 15 September 2013. 
  18. ^ Joint Typhoon Warning Center. "TYPHOON 11W (UTOR) WARNING NR 024". United States Navy, United States Air Force. Archived from the original on 14 August 2013. Retrieved 15 September 2013. 
  19. ^ "SitRep No.18 re Effects of Typhoon "LABUYO" (UTOR)" (PDF). National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council. Retrieved August 18, 2013. 
  20. ^ "Labuyo barrels toward Luzon". Philstar. Retrieved August 12, 2013. 
  21. ^ "Palace: Gov’t ready for onslaught of typhoon ‘Labuyo’". Retrieved August 12, 2013. 
  22. ^ "Typhoon Labuyo makes landfall over Casiguran, Aurora". Retrieved August 12, 2013. 
  23. ^ "Pangasinan braces for typhoon ‘Labuyo’". Retrieved August 12, 2013. 
  24. ^ "Red alert raised as Labuyo prepares to hit C. Luzon". Retrieved August 12, 2013. 
  25. ^ "One dead, 23 missing as typhoon Labuyo hits Luzon". Retrieved August 12, 2013. 
  26. ^ "23 Fishermen Missing as Typhoon Batters Philippines". NY Times. Retrieved August 12, 2013. 
  27. ^ "Typhoon ‘Labuyo’ batters Aurora town". Retrieved August 12, 2013. 
  28. ^ "10 Flights canceled due to typhoon “Labuyo”". Retrieved August 12, 2013. 
  29. ^ "SitRep No. 16 re Effects of Typhoon "Labuyo" (Utor)" (PDF). National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council. Government of the Philippines. August 16, 2013. Retrieved August 16, 2013. 
  30. ^ Bulk carrier Trans Summer sank off Hong Kong in Typhoon Utor. Maritime Bulletin, 14 August 2013. Retrieved on 2013-08-14.
  31. ^ a b “尤特”刮走广东18亿 已致4人死亡4人失踪 (in Chinese). 中新社. August 16, 2013. Retrieved August 16, 2013. 
  32. ^ (Chinese) http://news.xinhuanet.com/fortune/2013-08/23/c_125231750.htm
  33. ^ 翁晔、邹婷玉 (August 18, 2013). “尤特”及其残留云系已致广西近百万人受灾 (in Chinese). 新华网. Retrieved August 18, 2013. 
  34. ^ 台风“尤特”致湖南5人遇难5人失踪 (in Chinese). 搜狐公司. August 18, 2013. Retrieved August 18, 2013. 
  35. ^ Flores, Helen (August 17, 2013). "2 low-pressure areas spotted off northern Luzon". Philstar.com. Retrieved August 17, 2013. 
  36. ^ Aben, Elena L (August 19, 2013). "‘Labuyo’ damage hits P1.4 B". The Manila Bulletin. Archived from the original on August 19, 2013. Retrieved August 19, 2013. 

External links[edit]