1923 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1923 Alabama Crimson Tide football
1923tide.jpg
Conference Southern Conference
1923 record 7–2–1 (4–1–1 SoCon)
Head coach Wallace Wade (1st year)
Offensive scheme Single wing
Captain Al Clemens
Home stadium Denny Field
Rickwood Field
Cramton Bowl
Uniform
20sTideuniform.png
Seasons
← 1922
1924 →
1923 Southern Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Vanderbilt* + 4 0 1     5 2 1
Washington & Lee + 4 0 1     6 3 1
Florida 1 0 2     6 1 2
VPI 4 1 0     6 3 0
Alabama 4 1 1     7 2 1
Tennessee 4 2 0     5 4 1
Maryland 3 1 0     7 2 1
Mississippi A&M 2 1 2     5 2 2
North Carolina 2 1 1     5 3 1
Georgia 3 2 0     5 3 1
Tulane 2 2 1     6 3 1
Clemson 1 1 1     5 2 1
Georgia Tech 0 0 4     3 2 4
NC State 1 4 0     3 7 0
Auburn 0 1 3     3 3 3
Kentucky 0 2 2     4 3 2
Virginia 0 3 1     3 5 1
LSU 0 3 0     3 5 1
Ole Miss 0 4 0     4 6 0
South Carolina 0 4 0     4 6 0
  • + – Conference co-champions
  • * – co-member of SIAA

The 1923 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1923 Southern Conference football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 30th overall and 2nd season as a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon). The team was led by head coach Wallace Wade, in his first year, and played their home games at Denny Field in Tuscaloosa, at Rickwood Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of seven wins, two losses and one tie (7–2–1 overall, 4–1–1 in the SoCon).

1923 marked the first season for new head coach Wallace Wade, a former assistant at Vanderbilt. One year after Alabama's triumphal trip to Penn, the Tide went on another northeast roadtrip with a different outcome, losing to Syracuse 23–0. Against Georgia Tech, Alabama was very lucky to escape with a 0–0 tie. After defeating Georgia, the Tide was the favorite for a Southern title. A season-ending, 16–6 upset loss to coach James Van Fleet's Florida Gators cost coach Wade and the Tide the Southern Conference championship.

Before the season[edit]

On November 6, 1922, Alabama head coach Xen C. Scott announced his resignation as head coach of the Crimson Tide as a result of his deteriorating health.[1] On December 16, 1922, the University Athletic Council announced that Vanderbilt athletic director and assistant football coach Wallace Wade had been hired to serve as both head football coach and athletic director at Alabama.[2] On the hiring, the Athletic Council stated:

Mr. Wade's experience as a football coach has been brilliant and successful. He comes to us with the highest recommendation not only from Vanderbilt and Brown authorities, but also from many of the leading football experts of the South and indeed the entire country. If we rely on expert testimony, the University is fortunate securing a man of Mr. Wade's character, experience, and achievements.[2]"

Prior to his being hired at Alabama, Kentucky also bid for his services as head coach of the Wildcats. After Kentucky kept Wade too long at a meeting, Alabama hired him, and Wade then vowed he would never lose a game to Kentucky.[3]

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent Site Result Attendance
September 29 Union (TN)* Denny FieldTuscaloosa, AL W 12–0    
October 6 Ole Miss Denny Field • Tuscaloosa, AL (Rivalry) W 56–0    
October 13 at Syracuse* Archbold StadiumSyracuse, NY L 0–23    
October 20 Sewanee* Rickwood FieldBirmingham, AL W 7–0   10,000
October 27 at Spring Hill* Monroe Park • Mobile, AL W 59–0   2,600
November 3 at Georgia Tech Grant FieldAtlanta, GA T 0–0   10,000
November 10 Kentuckydagger Denny Field • Tuscaloosa, AL W 16–8   7,000
November 16 LSU Cramton BowlMontgomery, AL (Rivalry) W 30–3    
November 24 Georgia Cramton Bowl • Montgomery, AL W 36–0    
November 29 Florida Rickwood Field • Birmingham, AL L 6–16   10,000
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming.
  • Source: Rolltide.com: 1923 Alabama football schedule[4]

Game summaries[edit]

Union[edit]

Week 1: Union at Alabama
1 2 3 4 Total
Union 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 0 0 0 12 12
  • Date: September 29
  • Location: Denny Field
    Tuscaloosa, AL
  • Referee: Coles (Clemson)

Alabama opened their 1923 season against Union University at Denny Field, and defeated the Bulldogs 12–0 in what was Wallace Wade's first game as head coach of the Crimson Tide.[5][6] In a game dominated by both defenses, Alabama did not score any points until the fourth quarter. Pooley Hubert scored first on a one-yard run and was followed by a six-yard Allen Graham MacCartee touchdown pass to Ben Hudson with only 00:15 left in the game.[5]

The victory brought Alabama's all-time record against Union to 2–0.[7]

The starting lineup was Al Clemens (left end), Bill Buckler (left tackle), Pete Camp (left guard), Clyde Propst (center), Bruce Jones (right guard), Ben E. Compton (right tackle), Ben Hudson (right end), Graham McClintock (quarterback), Red Barnes (left halfback), Johnny Mack Brown (right halfback), Pooley Hubert (fullback).[5]

Ole Miss[edit]

Week 2: Ole Miss at Alabama
1 2 3 4 Total
Ole Miss 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 14 14 28 0 56
  • Date: October 6
  • Location: Denny Field
    Tuscaloosa, AL
  • Referee: Morfarity (St. Mary's)

Alabama opened conference play against Ole Miss, and defeated the Rebels 56–0 at Denny Field.[6][8] The Crimson Tide scored eight touchdowns in the contest. In addition to Pete Camp scoring a pair after he recovered blocked Rebels kicks in the end zone, touchdowns were also scored twice by Red Barnes and one each by Ben Hudson, Pooley Hubert, Allen MacCartee and Johnny Mack Brown.[8]

The victory brought Alabama's all-time record against Ole Miss to 10–2–1.[9]

The starting lineup was Al Clemens (left end), Bill Buckler (left tackle), Jack Langhorne (left guard), Clyde Propst (center), Pete Camp (right guard), Ben E. Compton (right tackle), Ben Hudson (right end), Grant Gillis (quarterback), Red Barnes (left halfback), Johnny Mack Brown (right halfback), Pooley Hubert (fullback).[8]

Syracuse[edit]

Week 3: Alabama at Syracuse
1 2 3 4 Total
Alabama 0 0 0 0 0
Syracuse 3 0 6 14 23
  • Date: October 13
  • Location: Archbold Stadium
    Syracuse, NY
  • Referee: E. J. O'Brien

For their third game, Alabama played an intersectional contest at Syracuse University, and were defeated by the Orangemen 23–0 at Archbold Stadium.[6][10][11] Syracuse took a 3–0 lead in the first quarter behind a 15-yard John McBride field goal. The Orangemen extended their lead in the third to 9–0 after Evander MacRae recovered a fumble and returned it 35-yards for a touchdown. Syracuse then closed the game with a pair of fourth quarter touchdowns on a 65-yard punt return by Chester Bowman on a McBride run.[10][11]

The starting lineup was Al Clemens (left end), Bill Buckler (left tackle), Jack Langhorne (left guard), Clyde Propst (center), Pete Camp (right guard), Ben E. Compton (right tackle), Ben Hudson (right end), Grant Gillis (quarterback), Red Barnes (left halfback), Johnny Mack Brown (right halfback), Pooley Hubert (fullback).[8]

Sewanee[edit]

Week 4: Sewanee at Alabama
1 2 3 4 Total
Sewanee 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 0 0 0 7 7
  • Date: October 20
  • Location: Rickwood Field
    Birmingham, AL
  • Game attendance: 10,000
  • Referee: Branch Bocock

A week after their first loss of the season, Alabama defeated the Sewanee Tigers 7–0 at Rickwood Field.[6][12] The game was a defensive struggle with neither team scoring until late in the fourth quarter. With under two minutes left in the contest, Johnny Mack Brown intercepted a Tiger pass and returned it to their 48-yard line. Pooley Hubert then led Alabama down the field and scored the game-winning touchdown on a short run.[12] Sewanee had time to run only two plays before the game ended.

The victory brought Alabama's all-time record against Sewanee to 6–10–3.[13]

The starting lineup was Al Clemens (left end), Bill Buckler (left tackle), Bruce Jones (left guard), Clyde Propst (center), Pete Camp (right guard), Ben E. Compton (right tackle), Hulet Whitaker (right end), Grant Gillis (quarterback), Country Oliver (left halfback), Allen MacCartee (right halfback), Pooley Hubert (fullback).[12]

Spring Hill[edit]

Before 2,600 fans at Monroe Park at Mobile, the Crimson Tide shutout the Spring Hill Badgers 59–0.[14] In the Game Alabama touchdowns were made by Hubert (3), Barnes (2), Hudson, Baty, Gillis, and Cohen.[6] The victory brought Alabama's all-time record against Spring Hill to 2–0.[15]

The starting lineup was Al Clemens (left end), Bill Buckler (left tackle), Bruce Jones (left guard), Clyde Propst (center), Pete Camp (right guard), Ben E. Compton (right tackle), Hulet Whitaker (right end), Grant Gillis (quarterback), Red Barnes (left halfback), W. S. Oliver (right halfback), Pooley Hubert (fullback).[14]

Georgia Tech[edit]

Week 6: Alabama at Georgia Tech
1 2 3 4 Total
Alabama 0 0 0 0 0
Georgia Tech 0 0 0 0 0
  • Date: November 3
  • Location: Grant Field
    Atlanta, GA
  • Game attendance: 10,000
  • Game weather: Rain
  • Referee: Springer

In a driving rain, Georgia Tech and Alabama played to a scoreless tie, "one of the weirdest games ever seen on a football field."[16] Tech had 18 first downs to none for Alabama, and the Tide never advanced the ball beyond its own 27-yard line. Sixteen punts from Grant Gillis helped Bama to hold Tech scoreless, and Tech drives stalled on the Alabama 2, 8, and 11-yard lines.[6] The Golden Tornado also missed on the lone field goal attempt by H. L. Reeves from 45 yards out.[17] The tie brought Alabama's all-time record against Georgia Tech to 2–7–2.[18]

The starting lineup was Al Clemens (left end), Bill Buckler (left tackle), Bruce Jones (left guard), Clyde Propst (center), Pete Camp (right guard), Ben E. Compton (right tackle), Hulet Whitaker (right end), Grant Gillis (quarterback), Red Barnes (left halfback), William Baty (right halfback), Pooley Hubert (fullback).[14]

Kentucky[edit]

Week 7: Kentucky at Alabama
1 2 3 4 Total
Kentucky 0 0 0 8 8
Alabama 9 0 0 7 16
  • Date: November 10
  • Location: Denny Field
    Tuscaloosa, AL
  • Game attendance: 7,000
  • Referee: Kittleman (Wisconsin)

On homecoming at Tuscaloosa, a 16–8 victory over Kentucky saw a late surge by the Wildcats. Alabama scored first when Ben Compton kicked a 33-yard field goal.[19][20] Pooley Hubert bucked over for a touchdown later in the first period after a 30-yard, end run by Grant Gillis that made the score 9–0.[19][20]

In the fourth quarter, Gillis intercepted a pass which led to his one-yard touchdown on the subsequent play that extended the Alabama lead to 16–0.[20] Later in the quarter, Kentucky scored their only touchdown on a 60-yard Len Tracy run that cut the Alabama lead to 16–6.[20] The final margin of 16–8 resulted after Graham McClintock was tackled for a safety after a bad snap on a punt attempt.[20] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Kentucky to 2–1.[21]

The starting lineup was Al Clemens (left end), Bill Buckler (left tackle), Jack Langhorne (left guard), Clyde Propst (center), Pete Camp (right guard), Ben E. Compton (right tackle), Newton (right end), Allen McCartee (quarterback), Red Barnes (left halfback), William Baty (right halfback), Pooley Hubert (fullback).[20]

LSU[edit]

Week 8: LSU at Alabama
1 2 3 4 Total
LSU 3 0 0 0 3
Alabama 9 7 7 7 30
  • Date: November 16
  • Location: Cramton Bowl
    Montgomery, AL
  • Referee: Coles (Clemson)

On a Friday evening at the Cramton Bowl, Alabama defeated LSU under first-year head coach Mike Donahue by a 30–3 score.[22] LSU scored their only points on a first quarter, 27-yard field goal from William Pitcher. Alabama responded with a 20-yard Ben Compton field goal on the drive that ensured and tied the game 3–3.[23] Later in the quarter, a Pitcher fumble was recovered by Ben Compton for a touchdown and 9–3 Crimson Tide lead.[22][23] Alabama extended their lead to 16–3 at the half after Tom Newton intercepted a LSU pass and returned it 40-yard for a touchdown.[22][23]

In the third quarter, a Pooley Hubert interception led to his two-yard touchdown run on the drive that ensued for a 23–3 lead.[22][23] William Baty then made the final score 30–3 with his short touchdown run late in the fourth quarter.[22][23] Of note, the game marked the first since their 1920 season that Al Clemens was not in the starting lineup for Alabama.[22] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against LSU to 7–3–1.[24]

The starting lineup was Hulet Whitaker (left end), Jack Langhorne (left tackle), Bruce Jones (left guard), Clyde Propst (center), Pete Camp (right guard), Tom Newton (right end), Grant Gillis (quarterback), Allen McCartee (left halfback), William Baty (right halfback), Pooley Hubert (fullback).[22]

Georgia[edit]

Week 9: Georgia at Alabama
1 2 3 4 Total
Georgia 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 0 10 7 19 36
  • Date: November 24
  • Location: Cramton Bowl
    Montgomery, AL
  • Referee: Springer (Penn)

At the Cramton Bowl for their second consecutive game, Alabama defeated the Georgia Bulldogs 36–0 and were dubbed unofficial Southern champions.[25] After a scoreless first quarter, Alabama scored their first points on a 50-yard Allen McCartee touchdown pass to Grant Gillis for a 7–0 lead.[26] They extended their halftime lead to 10–0 behind a 25-yard Ben Compton field goal.[26]

Alabama's third-quarter touchdown was set up after Clyde Propst recovered a Georgia fumble deep in Bulldog territory. Two plays later, Pooley Hubert scored on a short run for a 17–0 Crimson Tide lead.[26] Alabama closed the game with a trio of fourth quarter touchdowns for the 36–0 victory. The first came on a Red Barnes run, a Propst interception return and on a blocked punt recovered by Hulet Whitaker for the final points of the game.[26] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Georgia to 6–9–3.[27]

The starting lineup was Al Clemens (left end), Bill Buckler (left tackle), Bruce Jones (left guard), Clyde Propst (center), Pete Camp (right guard), Jack Langhorne (right tackle), Tom Newton (right end), Grant Gillis (quarterback), Allen McCartee (left halfback), William Baty (right halfback), Pooley Hubert (fullback).[25]

Florida[edit]

Week 10: Florida at Alabama
1 2 3 4 Total
Florida 0 0 9 7 16
Alabama 0 6 0 0 6
  • Date: November 29
  • Location: Rickwood Field
    Birmingham, AL
  • Game attendance: 10,000
  • Game weather: Rain

On a muddy field with pools of water, the Florida Gators upset[28] the Tide with a comeback, 16–6 victory on Thanksgiving Day,[29][30][31] putting the Florida program in the national spotlight for the first time.[32] The upset gave Wade's previous school of Vanderbilt the SoCon title. In an attempt to drum up publicity, Champ Pickens photographed a stuffed alligator and drew tiny Crimsons swarming around it.[33]

Florida's Edgar C. Jones.

Florida back Edgar C. Jones scored all of his team's points. The Gator scores by Jones came on runs of 10 yards around right end, a 12-yard place kick, and a 20-yard run around right end.[34] The punting of Ark Newton and the line play of captain Robbie Robinson (in his final game) and Goldy Goldstein also helped the Gators get the victory.[34]

In the first half, Alabama's Grant Gillis won the punting battle and Florida was on the defensive, turning back multiple scoring threats from inside the 10-yard line.[34] Pooley Hubert scored first.[35] The Gators eschewed their stockings in the second half, due to the rain and mud, and waited until the last minute to come out for the kickoff, while Alabama was already lined up. Because of this maneuver, Wade never spoke to coach Van Fleet again.[33]

A few minutes into the second half, Newton complete a 12-yard pass to Dick Brown, down at Alabama's 20-yard line. Brown went around left end for 9 yards; then Jones went around right end for 10 yards and the tying touchdown. Newton missed the extra point.[34] Moments later Newton kicked a punt of 60 yards, from his own 20-yard line to the same of Alabama's.[33] Gillis botched the ensuing Alabama punt.[34] Bill Middlekauff ran behind left guard twice, and Newton ran behind right tackle once, netting 8 yards in three plays. From the 12-yard line, Jones converted a placekick. Newton continued to punt well, and attempted a 53-yard field goal which barely missed.[34] He also tried a 60-yard field goal which was blocked, recovered by Florida's Joe Merrin on Alabama's 20-yard line. Runs at the line failed, and Jones went around right end for 20 yards and the final touchdown.[34] The loss brought Alabama's all-time record against Florida to 1–2.[36]

Postseason[edit]

After much controversy over who to give the Champ Pickens Trophy, it was awarded to Vanderbilt over Florida.[37]

Personnel[edit]

Depth chart[edit]

The following chart provides a visual depiction of Alabama's lineup during the 1923 season with games started at the position reflected in parenthesis. The chart mimics a single wing on offense.

Varsity letter winners[edit]

Line[edit]

Player Hometown Position Games
started
Prep school Height Weight Age
Bill Buckler Saint Paul, Minnesota Guard 4
Joseph "Pete" Camp Manchester, Alabama Tackle 4
Al Clemens Scottsboro, Alabama End 4
Ben E. Compton Greensboro, Alabama Guard 4
Ernest Cooper St. Stephens, Alabama Tackle
Elmer Wilbur Dany Cleveland, Ohio End
Ben Hudson Montgomery, Alabama End 3
Bruce Jones Jasper, Alabama Guard 2
Jack Langhorne Uniontown, Alabama Tackle 2
Graham McClintock Laurel, Mississippi End/Back 1
Clyde "Shorty" Propst Ohatchee, Alabama Center 4

Backfield[edit]

Player Hometown Position Games
started
Prep school Height Weight Age
William C. Baty Bessemer, Alabama Halfback
Johnny Mack Brown Dothan, Alabama Halfback 3 Dothan High 5'11" 160 19
Andy Cohen El Paso, Texas Back 5'8" 155 19
Grant Gillis Grove Hill, Alabama Quarterback 3 5'10 165 22
Robert Poole Hinton Uniontown, Alabama Back
Allison "Pooley" Hubert Meridian, Mississippi Fullback 4 Meridian High 5'10" 190 22
Allen Graham MacCartee Washington, D.C. Halfback 1
W. S. "Country" Oliver Panola, Alabama Back/Tackle 1
L. O. Wesley Guin, Alabama Quarterback

Other[edit]

Name Hometown Position
Clifford Inglis Manager

[38]

Coaching staff[edit]

Name Position Seasons at
Alabama
Alma Mater
Wallace Wade Head coach 1 Brown (1917)
Hank Crisp Assistant coach 3 VPI (1920)
Russell Cohen Assistant coach 1 Vanderbilt (1916)
William T. Van de Graaff Assistant coach 3 Alabama (1916)

[39]

References[edit]

General

  • "1923 Season Recap" (PDF). RollTide.com. University of Alabama Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. Retrieved October 10, 2016. 
  • Woodruff, Fuzzy (1928). A History of Southern Football 1890–1928. 2. 

Specific

  1. ^ "Scott resigns as Alabama football coach". Cleveland Plain Dealer. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. November 7, 1922. p. 22. 
  2. ^ a b "William Wallace Wade of Vandy is appointed coach of all athletics at state university". The Montgomery Advertiser. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. December 17, 1922. p. 5. 
  3. ^ Barnhart, Tony (2008). Southern Fried Football (Revised): The History, Passion, and Glory of the Great Southern Game. Triumph Books. ISBN 9781623684884. 
  4. ^ "1923 Alabama football schedule". RollTide.com. University of Alabama Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. Retrieved October 10, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Union loses to Alabama: Score 12–0". The Times-Picayune. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. September 30, 1923. p. 5.9. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f 1923 Season Recap
  7. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Union (TN)". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 10, 2016. 
  8. ^ a b c d e "Alabama swamps Ole Miss: Score 56–0". The Times-Picayune. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. October 7, 1923. p. 5.10. 
  9. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Mississippi". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 10, 2016. 
  10. ^ a b c "Syracuse downs Alabama eleven". The State. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. October 14, 1923. p. 10. 
  11. ^ a b c "Syracuse buries Alabama eleven". The Sunday Repository. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. October 14, 1923. p. 37. 
  12. ^ a b c d "Alabama bucks over touchdown to beat Sewanee at finish". The Tampa Tribune. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. October 21, 1923. p. 11E. 
  13. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Sewanee (TN)". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 10, 2016. 
  14. ^ a b c "Spring Hill rolled over by Alabama". The Times-Picayune. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. October 28, 1923. p. 9. 
  15. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Spring Hill (AL)". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved January 7, 2017. 
  16. ^ Woodruff 1928, p. 258
  17. ^ "Georgia Tech held to tie by Alabama". The Times-Picayune. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. November 4, 1923. p. 12. 
  18. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Georgia Tech". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved January 7, 2017. 
  19. ^ a b Woodruff 1928, pp. 264–265
  20. ^ a b c d e f "Kentuckians lower flag to Alabama". The Times-Picayune. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. November 11, 1923. p. 4. 
  21. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Kentucky". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved January 7, 2017. 
  22. ^ a b c d e f g "Tigers put up hard fight, but fail to hold heavy Alabama team". The State Times. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. November 17, 1923. p. 8. 
  23. ^ a b c d e "Louisiana Tigers defeated 30 to 3 by Alabama clan". The Times-Picayune. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. November 17, 1923. p. 18. 
  24. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Louisiana St.". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved January 7, 2017. 
  25. ^ a b Woodruff 1928, pp. 270–271
  26. ^ a b c d "Alabama sweeps to victory over Georgia, 36–0". The Augusta Chronicle. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. November 25, 1923. p. 3. 
  27. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Georgia". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved January 7, 2017. 
  28. ^ "Surprises of South Upset Title Dope". The Monroe News-Star. November 30, 1923. p. 7. Retrieved August 21, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  29. ^ Associated Press (November 17, 1923). "Florida Licks Alabama, 16–6". The Bee. p. 17. Retrieved August 19, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  30. ^ Mike Bynum. The Greatest Moments of Florida Gators Football. p. 4. 
  31. ^ ESPN college football encyclopedia. p. 275. 
  32. ^ Steve Rajtar. Gone Pro: Florida: Gator Athletes Who Became Pros. p. 30. 
  33. ^ a b c McEwen, Tom, The Gators: A Story of Florida Football, The Strode Publishers, Huntsville, Alabama (1974). ISBN 0-87397-025-X.
  34. ^ a b c d e f g "Gators Trounce Alabama In Titular Grid Contest". The Evening Independent. November 30, 1923. Retrieved August 19, 2015. 
  35. ^ "1923 Alabama vs. Florida". Paul W. Bryant Museum. Retrieved January 7, 2017. 
  36. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Florida". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved January 7, 2017. 
  37. ^ Woodruff 1928, p. 274–275
  38. ^ "All-Time Tide Football Lettermen". 2011 Alabama Crimson Tide Football Record Book. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: University of Alabama Athletics Media Relations Office. 2011. pp. 127–141. 
  39. ^ "All-Time Assistant Coaches". 2011 Alabama Crimson Tide Football Record Book. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: University of Alabama Athletics Media Relations Office. 2011. pp. 142–143.