1925 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

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1925 Alabama Crimson Tide football
1925 Alabama Crimson Tide football team photo.jpg
National champion (multiple selectors)
Rose Bowl champion
SoCon co-champion
Southern champion
Champ Pickens Trophy
Rose Bowl, W 20–19 vs. Washington
Conference Southern Conference
1925 record 10–0 (7–0 SoCon)
Head coach Wallace Wade (3rd year)
Assistant coach Hank Crisp
Offensive scheme Single-wing
Captain Bruce Jones
Home stadium Denny Field
Rickwood Field
Cramton Bowl
Uniform
20sTideuniform.png
Seasons
← 1924
1926 →
1925 Southern Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Alabama + 7 0 0     10 0 0
Tulane + 5 0 0     9 0 1
North Carolina 4 0 1     7 1 1
Washington and Lee 5 1 0     5 5 0
Virginia 4 1 1     7 1 1
Georgia Tech 4 1 1     6 2 1
Kentucky 4 2 0     6 3 0
Florida 3 2 0     8 2 0
Auburn 3 2 1     5 3 1
VPI 3 3 1     5 3 2
Vanderbilt 3 3 0     6 3 0
Tennessee 2 2 1     5 2 1
South Carolina 2 2 0     7 3 0
Georgia 2 4 0     4 5 0
VMI 2 4 0     6 4 0
Sewanee 1 4 0     4 4 1
Mississippi A&M 1 4 0     3 4 1
LSU 0 2 1     5 3 1
NC State 0 4 1     3 5 1
Ole Miss 0 4 0     5 5 0
Clemson 0 4 0     1 7 0
Maryland 0 4 0     2 5 1
  • + – Conference co-champions

The 1925 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1925 Southern Conference football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 32nd overall and 4th season as a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon). The team was led by head coach Wallace Wade, in his third year, and played their home games at Denny Field in Tuscaloosa, at Rickwood Field in Birmingham and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished the season with their first ever perfect record (10–0 overall, 7–0 in the SoCon), as Southern Conference champions and as national champions after they defeated Washington in the Rose Bowl.[1]

The Crimson Tide entered the season as the defending Southern Conference champions after finishing the 1924 season with an 8–1 record. Alabama would then go on and shutout all but one of their regular season opponents en route to a second consecutive Southern Conference championship. The Crimson Tide then accepted an invitation to participate as the first Southern team in the annual Rose Bowl Game, where they defeated Washington 20–19. This victory has subsequently been recognized as one of the most important in Southern football history as well as has been deemed "the game that changed the South."

Before the season[edit]

Alabama was last year upset by Centre. Former center and alumnus Shorty Propst was hired to the coaching staff.

1925 saw the south's widespread use of the forward pass.[2]

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent Site Result Attendance
September 26 Union (TN)* Denny FieldTuscaloosa, AL W 53–0    
October 2 Birmingham–Southern* Denny Field • Tuscaloosa, AL W 50–7    
October 10 at LSU Tiger StadiumBaton Rouge, LA (Rivalry) W 42–0   8,000
October 17 Sewanee Rickwood FieldBirmingham, AL W 27–0    
October 24 at Georgia Tech Grant FieldAtlanta, GA W 7–0   20,000
October 31 Mississippi A&Mdagger Denny Field • Tuscaloosa, AL (Rivalry) W 6–0   7,000
November 7 Kentucky Rickwood Field • Birmingham, AL W 31–0    
November 14 Florida Cramton BowlMontgomery, AL W 34–0    
November 26 Georgia Rickwood Field • Birmingham, AL W 27–0    
January 1, 1926 vs. Washington* Rose BowlPasadena, CA (Rose Bowl) W 20–19   55,000
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming.
  • Source: Rolltide.com: 1925 Alabama football schedule[3]

Game notes[edit]

Union[edit]

Week 1: Union at Alabama
1 2 3 4 Total
Union 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 13 27 7 6 53
  • Date: September 26
  • Location: Denny Field
    Tuscaloosa, AL
  • Referee: Charles Kittleman

Alabama opened their 1925 season against Union University at Denny Field, and defeated the Bulldogs 53–0 in rainy field conditions.[4][5] The Crimson Tide played every player on their squad in this game and touchdowns were scored twice each by Herschel Caldwell and David Rosenfeld; and were scored once each by Johnny Mack Brown, Hoyt Winslett, Waile and James Johnson.[4] The margin of victory was not unexpected with The Augusta Chronicle stating:

"Union's squad is nothing more than a first class prep school and the Crimson Tide has no right to boast of their score and win.[6]"

The victory brought Alabama's all-time record against Union to 4–0 in what was the final game played between the schools.[7]

The starting lineup was Melvin Vines (left end), Pickhard (left tackle), Buckler (left guard), Jones (center), Perry (right guard), Camp (right tackle), Hudson (right end), Barnes (quarterback), M. Brown (left halfback), Caldwell (right halfback), Hubert (fullback).[4]

Birmingham–Southern[edit]

Only one team scored on the Tide all regular season — Birmingham–Southern managed a touchdown after recovering a Grant Gillis fumble at the Alabama 25-yard line. Aided by two offside penalties, the Panthers drove the ball into the endzone. The Tide won 50–7. Hubert and Winslett scored two touchdowns each; and Rosenfeld, Gillis, Johnson and Barnes one each.[5] The last period went scoreless.[5] The victory brought Alabama's all-time record against Birmingham–Southern to 3–0 in what was the final game played between the schools.[8]

LSU[edit]

Week 3: Alabama at LSU
1 2 3 4 Total
Alabama 7 14 14 7 42
LSU 0 0 0 0 0
  • Date: October 10
  • Location: Tiger Stadium
    Baton Rouge, LA
  • Game attendance: 8,000
  • Referee: Finley

In a game described by some as "perfection itself," Alabama defeated the LSU Tigers at Baton Rouge 42–0 in what was both their first road and conference game of the season.[5][9][10] The Crimson Tide scored their first of six touchdowns on the opening drive of the game after Pooley Hubert scored on a three-yard run over center. In the second quarter, Hubert scored again on a one-yard run and David Rosenfeld scored on a five-yard run as time expired in the first half that gave Alabama a 21–0 halftime lead.[10]

Alabama received the second half kickoff and drove 65 yards for their fourth touchdown scored by Grant Gillis on a one-yard run.[10] Hubert then scored his third touchdown of the game on a short run that gave the Crimson Tide a 35–0 lead as they entered the fourth quarter.[10] In the fourth quarter, Hubert scored his fourth touchdown on another short run that made the final score 42–0.[10] The victory brought Alabama's all-time record against LSU to 8–3–1.[11]

The starting lineup was Hudson (left end), Camp (left tackle), Buckler (left guard), Holmes (center), Jones (right guard), Perry (right tackle), Winslett (right end), Gillis (quarterback), Barnes (left halfback), M. Brown (right halfback), Hubert (fullback).[12]

Sewanee[edit]

Week 4: Sewanee at Alabama
1 2 3 4 Total
Sewanee 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 6 7 0 14 27
  • Date: October 17
  • Location: Rickwood Field
    Birmingham, AL
  • Referee: Springer

1925 saw the South's widespread use of the forward pass, and Alabama brought it out to defeat the Sewanee Tigers 27–0 at Birmingham.[13][14][15] In the first quarter, a 28-yard pass from Hoyt Winslett to Red Barnes set up the first touchdown score on a short Pooley Hubert run for a 6–0 lead.[5][13] The Crimson Tide extended their lead to 13–0 at halftime behind Hubert's second touchdown of the game on a three-yard run.[13]

After a scoreless third, Alabama scored their third touchdown on a 35-yard pass from Grant Gillis to Herschel Caldwell, and the last set up by a 35-yard pass from Hubert to Winslett.[5][13] Hubert then scored the final points of the game late in the fourth after he recovered a Caldwell fumble in the endzone for a touchdown and the 27–0 victory.[13] The victory brought Alabama's all-time record against Sewanee to 8–10–3.[16]

The starting lineup was Hudson (left end), Perry (left tackle), Buckler (left guard), Holmes (center), Jones (right guard), Camp (right tackle), Winslett (right end), Gillis (quarterback), M. Brown (left halfback), Caldwell (right halfback), Hubert (fullback).[13]

Georgia Tech[edit]

Week 5: Alabama at Georgia Tech
1 2 3 4 Total
Alabama 0 0 7 0 7
Georgia Tech 0 0 0 0 0
  • Date: October 24
  • Location: Grant Field
    Atlanta, GA
  • Game attendance: 20,000
  • Referee: Burch

On a wet field, Alabama defeated coach William Alexander's Georgia Tech Golden Tornado 7–0 at Atlanta.[18][19] After a scoreless first half, Johnny Mack Brown scored the only points of the game when he returned a Doug Wycoff punt 45-yards for a touchdown.[17] "Hubert played the greatest game of his career and was called the greatest defensive back ever to appear on Grant Field".[5] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Georgia Tech to 4–7–2.[20]

The starting lineup was Winslett (left end), Perry (left tackle), Buckler (left guard), Holmes (center), Jones (right guard), Camp (right tackle), Hudson (right end), M. Brown (quarterback), Barnes (left halfback), Caldwell (right halfback), Hubert (fullback).[17]

Mississippi A&M[edit]

Week 6: Mississippi A&M at Alabama
1 2 3 4 Total
Mississippi A&M 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 0 6 0 0 6
  • Date: October 31
  • Location: Denny Field
    Tuscaloosa, AL
  • Game attendance: 7,000
  • Game weather: Rain
  • Referee: Springer

On homecoming, Alabama defeated the Mississippi A&M Aggies 6–0 on a rainy afternoon in Tuscaloosa.[5][21] After a scoreless first quarter, the Crimson Tide scored the only points of the game in the second after a short punt set them up on the Aggies' 26 yard line. Six plays later, Pooley Hubert threw an eight-yard touchdown pass to Hoyt Winslett, and Alabama took a 6–0 lead that held for the remainder of the game.[21] The closest A&M came to tying the game came in the third, but stalled after Herschel Caldwell had an interception that stopped an Aggies drive at the Alabama 16 yard line.[5] The victory brought Alabama's all-time record against Mississippi A&M to 10–4–2.[22]

The starting lineup was Winslett (left end), Perry (left tackle), Bowdoin (left guard), Paine (center), Dismukes (right guard), Pickhard (right tackle), T. Brown (right end), Hubert (quarterback), Gillis (left halfback), Rosenfeld (right halfback), Johnson (fullback).[21]

Kentucky[edit]

Week 7: Kentucky at Alabama
1 2 3 4 Total
Kentucky 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 10 7 7 7 31
  • Date: November 7
  • Location: Rickwood Field
    Birmingham, AL
  • Referee: Lambert (Ohio State)

At Rickwood Field, the Crimson Tide defeated the Kentucky Wildcats 31–0.[5][23][24] After Bill Buckler kicked an eight-yard field goal, Johnny Mack Brown ran a 79-yard touchdown "on a sweeping flank play" for a 10–0 Alabama lead at the end of the first quarter. Red Barnes extended their lead to 17–0 at halftime after he returned a John Ross fumble 77-yards for a touchdown.[23][24]

Brown scored again in the third quarter on a 16-yard run off a "triple fake pass," and Pooley Hubert made the final score 31–0 with his short run in the fourth quarter.[24] The victory brought Alabama's all-time record against Kentucky to 4–1.[25]

The starting lineup was Winslett (left end), Perry (left tackle), Jones (left guard), Holmes (center), Buckler (right guard), Camp (right tackle), T. Brown (right end), Hubert (quarterback), Caldwell (left halfback), Barnes (right halfback), M. Brown (fullback).[23]

Florida[edit]

Week 8: Florida at Alabama
1 2 3 4 Total
Florida 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 7 6 7 14 34
  • Date: November 14
  • Location: Cramton Bowl
    Montgomery, AL
  • Referee: Charles Kittleman

A large crowd was expected in Montgomery for the game against the Florida Gators.[26] The return to the lineup of Tide center Gordon Holmes, injured against Georgia Tech, and the battle between backs Mack Brown and Edgar C. Jones brought intrigue.[26] Mack Brown made two touchdowns; Red Barnes two, and Pooley Hubert one. Brown's first score came when he caught the ball on a pass from Hubert at the 15-yard line, dodged Jones and scored.[5] A pass from Hubert to Brown in the end zone netted the second score. Florida's Scott returned the kickoff to Alabama's 20-yard line, nearly breaking the tackle there. Two Barnes interceptions set up his touchdowns, one a 16-yard run after catch and another an end run. Jones attempted a drop kick, which was short and returned by Brown for 35 yards. A drive and a pass to Barnes got Alabama to Florida's 3-yard line, and Hubert scored over center.[5][27] The victory brought Alabama's all-time record against Florida to 2–2.[28]

The starting lineup was Winslett (left end), Perry (left tackle), Jones (left guard), Holmes (center), Buckler (right guard), Camp (right tackle), T. Brown (right end), Hubert (quarterback), M. Brown (left halfback), Barnes (right halfback), Caldwell (fullback).[29]

Georgia[edit]

Week 9: Georgia at Alabama
1 2 3 4 Total
Georgia 0 0 0 0 0
Alabama 7 7 6 7 27
  • Date: November 26
  • Location: Rickwood Field
    Birmingham, AL
  • Referee: Charles Kittleman

In their final regular season game, Alabama defeated the Georgia Bulldogs 27–0 and clinched their second consecutive Southern Conference championship.[5][30] The Crimson Tide took a 7–0 leas in the first quarter after Pooley Hubert reversed the ball to Hoyt Winslett, who then passed it 25 yards to Grant Gillis, who then ran for 25 more and the score.[30] Hubert then scored the final three touchdowns for Alabama. Hubert scored next after a fumble in the second. In the third period, Gillis made 22 yards on a triple pass to set up a short Hubert touchdown run. The last touchdown was set up by a Hubert pass to Ben A. Hudson that was followed by a short Hubert run for a 27–0 victory.[30]

This victory in conjunction with the tie game between Colgate and Brown all but assured the Crimson Tide's selection to the Rose Bowl.[31] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Georgia to 8–9–3.[32]

The starting lineup was Winslett (left end), Camp (left tackle), Jones (left guard), Holmes (center), Buckler (right guard), Perry (right tackle), T. Brown (right end), Hubert (quarterback), M. Brown (left halfback), Barnes (right halfback), Gillis (fullback).[30]

Postseason[edit]

Washington[edit]

Rose Bowl
1 2 3 4 Total
Alabama 0 0 20 0 20
Washington 6 6 0 7 19

The season was extended when Alabama received a surprise invitation to head west and play in the Rose Bowl. It was Alabama's first bowl game ever and the first time a southern team had ever been invited to play in what then was college football's only bowl game.[33] Its opponent was the Washington Huskies, who had gone 10–0–1, been just as dominant as the Tide, and were regarded as heavy favorites by the press.

Through one half, that prediction looked accurate. Washington's star halfback George Wilson intercepted a pass in the first quarter and then led his team 63 yards for a touchdown and a 6–0 lead. In the second quarter Wilson ran for 36 yards and then threw a 22-yard touchdown pass, and Washington went up 12–0. Both extra point tries failed. At the half, Wade changed his game plan, telling Pooley Hubert to run more often. Possibly more importantly, George Wilson sat out the entire third quarter due to sore ribs. It was in that third quarter that Alabama struck. A short punt set up Alabama on the Washington 42 and the Tide quickly capitalized, Hubert scoring on a 1-yard run to make the score 12–7. The Huskies couldn't move the ball without Wilson and punted. Shortly thereafter Hubert hit Brown on a 59-yard touchdown pass and suddenly Alabama led 14–12. Not long after that Washington fumbled the ball and Alabama recovered at the Husky 30. Hubert found Brown for another touchdown pass on the very next play. The extra point failed, but Alabama still led 20–12. Bama scored three touchdowns in seven minutes of clock time. Wilson returned in the fourth quarter and threw a late touchdown pass, but the two missed extra points in the first half proved decisive, and Alabama won 20–19.[34]

The starting lineup was Winslett (left end), Perry (left tackle), Buckler (left guard), Holmes (center), Jones (right guard), Camp (right tackle), T. Brown (right end), Gillis (quarterback), M. Brown (left halfback), Barnes (right halfback), Hubert (fullback).

Awards and honors[edit]

It was Alabama's first real perfect season in school history. (Bama was undefeated in 1897 when the Tide played and won one game.) The NCAA retroactively deemed Alabama to be the consensus "national champion" for 1925[35] due to its selection by a majority of authorities.[36] Johnny Mack Brown and Pooley Hubert were later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.[37][38] Brown capitalized on his Rose Bowl exposure in southern California by signing a motion picture contract with MGM and beginning a 40-year career in the movies.[39]

Personnel[edit]

Depth chart[edit]

The following chart provides a visual depiction of Alabama's lineup during the 1925 season with games started at the position reflected in parenthesis. The chart mimics a single wing on offense.

Varsity letter winners[edit]

Line[edit]

Number Player Hometown Position Games
started
Prep school Height Weight Age
Bill Buckler Saint Paul, Minnesota Guard 8
Joseph "Pete" Camp Manchester, Alabama Tackle 8
Ben E. Compton Greensboro, Alabama Guard
Gordon Holmes Springville, Alabama Center 6
Ben A. Hudson Montgomery, Alabama End 4
Bruce Jones Jasper, Alabama Guard 6
Leslie Payne Bay Minette, Alabama Tackle
Claude Perry Jasper, Alabama Tackle 8
Hulet Whitaker Guntersville, Alabama End
58 Hoyt "Wu" Winslett Dadeville, Alabama End 8 172 21

Backfield[edit]

Number Player Hometown Position Games
started
Prep school Height Weight Age
Red Barnes Grove Hill, Alabama Halfback 7 172 20
17 Johnny Mack Brown Dothan, Alabama Halfback 8 Dothan High 5'11" 160 21
Herschel Caldwell Blytheville, Arkansas Halfback 5 22
Grant Gillis Grove Hill, Alabama Quarterback 5 5'10" 165 24
Robert Lee Hamner Fayette, Alabama Back
10 Allison "Pooley" Hubert Meridian, Mississippi Fullback 9 Meridian High 5'10" 190 24
James Johnson Tuscaloosa, Alabama Halfback 1
W. S. Oliver Panola, Alabama Back/Tackle
David Rosenfeld Birmingham, Alabama Halfback 1

[40]

Other[edit]

Name Hometown Position
Ed Bruce Manager

Coaching staff[edit]

Name Position Seasons at
Alabama
Alma mater
Wallace Wade Head coach 3 Brown (1917)
Hank Crisp Assistant coach 5 VPI (1920)
Russell Cohen Assistant coach 3 Vanderbilt (1916)
Clyde "Shorty" Propst Assistant coach 1 Alabama (1924)
William T. Van de Graaff Assistant coach 5 Alabama (1916)

[41]

References[edit]

General

  • "1925 Season Recap" (PDF). RollTide.com. University of Alabama Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. Retrieved October 8, 2016. 

Specific

  1. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). "National Poll Champions" (PDF). 2011 NCAA Division I Football Records. NCAA.org. p. 73. Retrieved March 3, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Shaping College Football". google.com. 
  3. ^ "1925 Alabama football schedule". RollTide.com. University of Alabama Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. Retrieved March 3, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Bama has easy time with Union". The Times-Picayune. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. Associated Press. September 27, 1925. p. 6.1. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m 1925 Season Recap
  6. ^ "Tide beats Union". The Augusta Chronicle. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. September 28, 1925. p. 3. 
  7. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Union (TN)". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 8, 2016. 
  8. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Birmingham–Southern (AL)". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 8, 2016. 
  9. ^ a b Snee, Jimmy (October 11, 1925). "Alabama smothers helpless Louisiana Staters by 42 to 0". The Times-Picayune. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. p. 6.1. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f "Alabama sweeps over Tigers 42–0". The Advocate. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. October 11, 1925. p. 1. 
  11. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs LSU". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 8, 2016. 
  12. ^ "The game in figures". The Advocate. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. October 11, 1925. p. 1. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f g "Alabama Tide sweeps over Sewanee 27–0; Hubert is big star". The Times-Picayune. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. October 18, 1925. p. 6.1. 
  14. ^ a b "Alabama sweeps over Sewanee by score of 27 to 0". The Advocate. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. Associated Press. October 18, 1925. p. 17. 
  15. ^ "Shaping College Football". google.com. 
  16. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Sewanee (TN)". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 8, 2016. 
  17. ^ a b c "Alabama Wins 7 to 0, Brown Scores In Third After Punt By Wycoff". Anniston Star. October 25, 1925. p. 10. Retrieved May 3, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  18. ^ a b "Alabama checks Golden Tornado". The State. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. Associated Press. October 25, 1925. p. 11. 
  19. ^ a b "Alabama sweeps to 7–0 victory over Tech". The Augusta Chronicle. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. Associated Press. October 25, 1925. p. 3. 
  20. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Georgia Tech". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 8, 2016. 
  21. ^ a b c d "Aggies surprise 'Bama: Aggies hold Alabama U. to 6–0 score". The Times-Picayune. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. Associated Press. November 1, 1925. p. 6.1. 
  22. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Mississippi State". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 8, 2016. 
  23. ^ a b c d "Great Crimson Tide Continues To Flow, Unhalted, in South". Kentucky Kernel. November 13, 1925. 
  24. ^ a b c d "Bama Tide sweep over 'Tucky 31–0". The Times-Picayune. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. Associated Press. November 8, 1925. p. 6.1. 
  25. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Kentucky". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 8, 2016. 
  26. ^ a b c "Crimson Tide Rushing Upon Gator Eleven". Anniston Star. November 14, 1925. p. 6. Retrieved September 4, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  27. ^ "Crimson Tide Overcomes Gators; Goldstein Stars For Losing Aggregation". The Anniston Star. November 15, 1925. p. 8. Retrieved September 4, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  28. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Florida". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 8, 2016. 
  29. ^ "Alabama Machine Crushes Florida". The Index-Journal. November 15, 1925. p. 7. Retrieved September 5, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  30. ^ a b c d e "Crimson tide outclasses Bulldogs at all angles of the game". The Times-Picayune. NewsBank: America's Historical Newspapers. Associated Press. November 27, 1925. p. 14. 
  31. ^ Davis J. Walsh (November 27, 1925). "Wash. State And Ala. May Be Opponents". Journal Gazette. p. 7. Retrieved March 3, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  32. ^ DeLassus, David. "Alabama vs Georgia". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved October 8, 2016. 
  33. ^ Kordic, Gregory. A Damn Good Yankee: Xen Scott and the Rise of the Crimson Tide. 2007, AuthorHouse publishing. ISBN 978-1-4259-6018-6 p. 3
  34. ^ "A Bunch Of Farmers Upset Football Tradition", Sports Illustrated, Dec. 24, 1962
  35. ^ "NCAA History", Retroactive Poll Champions
  36. ^ NCAA Football, Football Bowl Subdivision Records, p. 79
  37. ^ Hall of Fame bio for Brown
  38. ^ Hall of Fame bio for Hubert
  39. ^ IMDb entry for Johnny Mack Brown
  40. ^ "All-Time Tide Football Lettermen". 2011 Alabama Crimson Tide Football Record Book. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: University of Alabama Athletics Media Relations Office. 2011. pp. 127–141. 
  41. ^ "All-Time Assistant Coaches". 2011 Alabama Crimson Tide Football Record Book. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: University of Alabama Athletics Media Relations Office. 2011. pp. 142–143.