2d Space Operations Squadron

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2d Space Operations Squadron
2 SOPS space systems operator 040205-F-0000C-001.jpg
Squadron space systems operator during Global Positioning System operations
Active 1962–1967; 1985–present
Country  United States
Branch  United States Air Force
Role Global Positioning System Control
Part of Air Force Space Command
Garrison/HQ Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado
Motto(s) Pathways for Peace
Engagements Global War on Terrorism
Decorations Air Force Outstanding Unit Award[1]
Commanders
Current
commander
Lt Col Peter "Charlie" Norsky
Insignia
2d Space Operations Squadron emblem (approved 8 July 1995)[1][note 1] 2 SOPS emblem.png

The 2d Space Operations Squadron is a unit of the United States Air Force at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. Its mission is to manage the Navstar Global Positioning System satellite constellation for global navigation, time transfer, and nuclear detonation detection.

The squadron is augmented by reserve personnel from the 19th Space Operations Squadron, part of the 310th Space Wing.

Mission[edit]

The squadron performs the command and control mission for the Global Positioning System satellite constellation. GPS is the world's premiere space-based position, velocity and timing system, capable of providing precision navigation and timing capability simultaneously to an unlimited number of properly equipped users. Continuous GPS availability and unprecedented signal accuracy has resulted in widespread integration of the technology; numerous military, commercial and international users have embraced GPS.{[citation needed|date=April 2017}}

History[edit]

The squadron was originally constituted as the 2d Surveillance Squadron and activated on 16 January 1962 under North American Air Defense Command. It was then organized on 1 February 1962 at Ent Air Force Base under the 9th Aerospace Defense Division, under which it operated SPACETRACK, the USAF globe-spanning space surveillance network, from 1962 through 1967. The squadron was inactivated on 1 January 1967.

It was redesignated the 2d Satellite Control Squadron as the first operational squadron of the 2d Space Wing. It was activated at Falcon Air Force Station on 1 October 1985.

The squadron has controlled the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System satellite constellation and managed the Nuclear Detonation System in support of the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty since 1987.

On 30 January 1992, as part of an Air Force reorganization, 2 SCS was redesignated the 2d Space Operations Squadron.

On June 18, 2004, a 24/7 user focal point, the GPSOC, was established.

In late 2005, several National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency monitor stations were integrated into the network to improve navigation accuracy and signal monitoring.

The unit had one geographically separated unit, Detachment 1, at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. It was responsible for maintenance of a GPS Ground Antenna, Monitor Station, and various operational test assets. It is now discontinued, though contractors remained to perform the mission.[2][3]

Lineage[edit]

  • Constituted as the 2d Surveillance Squadron (Sensor) and activated, on 16 January 1962 (not organized)
Organized on 1 February 1962
Discontinued and inactivated on 1 January 1967
  • Redesignated 2d Satellite Control Squadron on 16 Jul 1985
Activated on 1 October 1985
Redesignated 2d Space Operations Squadron on 30 Jan 1992[1]

Assignments[edit]

Stations[edit]

  • Ent Air Force Base, Colorado, 1 February 1962 – 1 January 1967
  • Falcon Air Force Station (later Falcon Air Force Base, Schriever Air Force Base), Colorado, 1 October 1985 – present[1]

Commanders[edit]

Squadron change of command June 24, 2016.
  • Lt Col Peter C. Norsky (June 2016 – Present)
  • Lt Col Todd Benson (July 2014 - June 2016)
  • Lt Col Thomas Ste. Marie (June 2012 – July 2014)
  • Lt Col Jennifer Grant (August 2010 - June 2012)
  • Lt Col DeAnna M. Burt (August 2008 – August 2010)[4]
  • Lt Col Kurt W. Kuntzleman (July 2006 - August 2008)[4]
  • Lt Col Stephen T. Hamilton (July 2004 - July 2006)
  • Lt Col Scott A. Henderson (July 2002 - July 2004)[5]
  • Lt Col Daniel P. Jordan (June 2000 - July 2002)
  • Lt Col James K. McLaughlin (July 1998 - June 2000)
  • Lt Col Joseph P. Squatrito (October 1996 - July 1998)
  • Lt Col Roger C. Hunter (March 1995 - October 1996)
  • Maj Thomas A. Shircliff (January 1995 - March 1995)
  • Lt Col Frank M. DeArmond (June 1994 - January 1995)
  • Lt Col Harrison C. Freer (June 1992 - June 1994)
  • Lt Col William L. Shelton (August 1990 - June 1992)
  • Lt Col Michael E. Shaw (April 1989 - August 1990)
  • Lt Col Barry R. Springer (April 1988 - April 1989)
  • Lt Col Steven C. Stadler (October 1985 - April 1988)[1]

Decorations[edit]

Air Force Outstanding Unit Award

  • 1 June 1964 – 31 May 1966
  • 1 December 1987 – 30 November 1989
  • 1 September 1990 – 31 August 1991

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ On a Blue disc, a Light Blue globe grid lined Yellow issuing from base and charged with a Scarlet lighting flash bendwise; in chief a White eight point pole star above and (Yellow pole stars) on a White orbit ring arcing over the globe; a Yellow pole star all within a narrow Yellow border. "2d Space Operations Squadron". The Institute of Heraldry. Retrieved April 3, 2017. 
Citations
  1. ^ a b c d e f Robertson, Patsy (December 1, 2008). "Factsheet 2 Space Operations Squadron (AFSPC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved April 3, 2017. 
  2. ^ Buchanan, Maj John (May 8, 2008). "Deactivation ends two decades of service on Cape Canaveral". 45th Space Wing Public Affairs. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved April 3, 2017. 
  3. ^ Staff writer, no byline (May 7, 2008). "2nd SOPS inactivates Det. 1". 50th Space Wing Public Affairs. Archived from the original on April 21, 2014. Retrieved April 3, 2017. 
  4. ^ a b Martinez, SSG Daniel (August 5, 2008). "New 2nd SOPS commander returns to Schriever". 50th Space Wing Public Affairs. Archived from the original on April 21, 2014. Retrieved April 3, 2017. 
  5. ^ The Newsletter of the MIT Security Studies Program: "SSP Welcomes New Military Fellows", Oct 2004

Bibliography[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency website http://www.afhra.af.mil/.

External links[edit]