736

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
736 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar736
DCCXXXVI
Ab urbe condita1489
Armenian calendar185
ԹՎ ՃՁԵ
Assyrian calendar5486
Balinese saka calendar657–658
Bengali calendar143
Berber calendar1686
Buddhist calendar1280
Burmese calendar98
Byzantine calendar6244–6245
Chinese calendar乙亥(Wood Pig)
3432 or 3372
    — to —
丙子年 (Fire Rat)
3433 or 3373
Coptic calendar452–453
Discordian calendar1902
Ethiopian calendar728–729
Hebrew calendar4496–4497
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat792–793
 - Shaka Samvat657–658
 - Kali Yuga3836–3837
Holocene calendar10736
Iranian calendar114–115
Islamic calendar117–118
Japanese calendarTenpyō 8
(天平8年)
Javanese calendar629–630
Julian calendar736
DCCXXXVI
Korean calendar3069
Minguo calendar1176 before ROC
民前1176年
Nanakshahi calendar−732
Seleucid era1047/1048 AG
Thai solar calendar1278–1279
Tibetan calendar阴木猪年
(female Wood-Pig)
862 or 481 or −291
    — to —
阳火鼠年
(male Fire-Rat)
863 or 482 or −290
Map of Dál Riata (modern Scotland)

Year 736 (DCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 736 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

Asia[edit]

Mesoamerica[edit]

By topic[edit]

Food and drinks[edit]

  • The first documentation is made of hop cultivation in the Hallertau region of present-day Germany (which is today the most important production centre with about 25% of the worldwide production).[5]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 19). ISBN 978-184603-230-1
  2. ^ Riche, Pierre (1993). The Carolingians: A Family Who Forged Europe. University of Pennsylvania Press, p. 45. ISBN 0-8122-1342-4
  3. ^ "Anglo-Saxons.net: S 89". Retrieved 27 April 2007.
  4. ^ Fletcher, Who's Who, pp. 98–100
  5. ^ Sirrine, Robert. J (2009), Sustainable Hop Production in the Great Lakes Region. Michigan State University.