Anghiari

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Anghiari
Comune di Anghiari
Anghiari.jpg
Location of Anghiari
Anghiari is located in Italy
Anghiari
Anghiari
Location of Anghiari in Italy
Anghiari is located in Tuscany
Anghiari
Anghiari
Anghiari (Tuscany)
Coordinates: 43°28′32″N 12°03′38″E / 43.47556°N 12.06056°E / 43.47556; 12.06056
CountryItaly
RegionTuscany
ProvinceArezzo (AR)
FrazioniCatigliano, Motina, Ponte alla Piera, San Leo, Scheggia, Tavernelle, Viaio
Government
 • MayorAlessandro Polcri
Area
 • Total130.92 km2 (50.55 sq mi)
Elevation
429 m (1,407 ft)
Population
 (2018-01-01)[2]
 • Total5,536
 • Density42/km2 (110/sq mi)
Demonym(s)Anghiaresi
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+2 (CEST)
Postal code
52031
Dialing code0575
Saint dayMay 3
WebsiteOfficial website

Anghiari is a hilltop town and comune in the Province of Arezzo, Tuscany, Italy.

Bordering communes include Arezzo (southwest), Pieve Santo Stefano (north) and Subbiano (west).

History[edit]

Anghiari is the location of the Battle of Anghiari between the Republic of Florence and the Duchy of Milan, which took place here on 29 June 1440.[3] The battle inspired a fresco in the Palazzo Vecchio by Leonardo da Vinci. The fresco has since gone missing although a sketch of it by Peter Paul Rubens is still in existence.

During World War II it hosted the concentration camp of Renicci.

Main sights[edit]

  • Palazzo Pretoriano
  • Badia di San Bartolomeo
  • Villa La Barbolana
  • Castello di Galbino

Culture[edit]

Each July, Anghiari is host to the Anghiari Festival featuring classical music, chamber music, choral works and opera. The resident orchestra is Southbank Sinfonia of London, conducted by Simon Over.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Superficie di Comuni Province e Regioni italiane al 9 ottobre 2011". Istat. Retrieved 16 March 2019.
  2. ^ "Popolazione Residente al 1° Gennaio 2018". Istat. Retrieved 16 March 2019.
  3. ^ Baynes, Thomas Spencer, ed. (1878). "Anghiari". Encyclopædia Britannica (Ninth ed.). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. II: 29. Retrieved 18 June 2019 – via Wikisource.org.

External links[edit]