Arnold, California

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Arnold
Location in Calaveras County and the state of California
Location in Calaveras County and the state of California
Arnold is located in the United States
Arnold
Arnold
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 38°15′N 120°21′W / 38.250°N 120.350°W / 38.250; -120.350Coordinates: 38°15′N 120°21′W / 38.250°N 120.350°W / 38.250; -120.350
Country United States
State California
CountyCalaveras
Area
 • Total14.85 sq mi (38.46 km2)
 • Land14.79 sq mi (38.30 km2)
 • Water0.06 sq mi (0.16 km2)  0.42%
Elevation
4,000 ft (1,219 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total3,843
 • Estimate 
(2016)[2]
N/A
Time zoneUTC−8 (Pacific (PST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−7 (PDT)
ZIP Code
95223
Area code(s)209
FIPS code06-02770
GNIS feature IDs1656296, 2407763

Arnold is a census-designated place (CDP) in Calaveras County, California, United States. The population was 3,843 at the 2010 census, down from 4,218 at the 2000 census. Arnold is located on State Route 4.

History[edit]

Arnold is named after Bob and Bernice Arnold, who, in 1927 opened the Ebbetts Pass Inn. Prior to that, the community consisted of two large ranches where logging was the main industry. The inn served as a stop for people traveling along the Ebbetts Pass route as well as lodging for those visiting nearby Calaveras Big Trees State Park. In 1928, Camp Wolfeboro was established nearby as a Boy Scout camp and continues to be in operation today. The first post office was opened in 1934.[3] Bernice was its postmistress at one time.

In 2015 power lines sparked the Butte Fire, which destroyed 549 homes in nearby communities. Arnold was saved when the weather changed, but the fire caused an increased focus on fire safety, although the community was still, in 2019, considered a "very high fire hazard severity zone" due to its location on a ridge outside Calaveras Big Trees State Park, surrounded by dense forest of trees killed by drought and beetles.[4]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 14.9 square miles (39 km2), of which, 14.8 square miles (38 km2) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) of it (0.47%) is water.

Arnold is considered at high risk of wildfire by CalFire due to its forested ridgetop location with powerful wind gusts up brushy canyons.[4]

Climate[edit]

Area has a Köppen Climate Classification of Csb, which is a dry-summer subtropical climate often referred to as "Mediterranean".[5]

Climate data for Arnold, California
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 45
(7)
47
(8)
50
(10)
56
(13)
65
(18)
75
(24)
83
(28)
82
(28)
76
(24)
65
(18)
53
(12)
47
(8)
62
(17)
Average low °F (°C) 28
(−2)
28
(−2)
30
(−1)
34
(1)
40
(4)
46
(8)
52
(11)
51
(11)
47
(8)
40
(4)
33
(1)
29
(−2)
38
(3)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 10.4
(260)
9.4
(240)
8.1
(210)
4.6
(120)
2.2
(56)
0.6
(15)
0.1
(2.5)
0.2
(5.1)
0.7
(18)
2.9
(74)
5.8
(150)
9.4
(240)
54.4
(1,380)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 29.6
(75)
23.6
(60)
27.3
(69)
16.1
(41)
2.1
(5.3)
0.1
(0.25)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.4
(1.0)
8.2
(21)
21.9
(56)
129.3
(328)
Source: Weatherbase [6]

Demographics[edit]

As many as 45% of the dwellings are vacation homes, a factor in fire safety efforts, as absent owners do not always clear the brush from their properties.[4]

Historical population
Census Pop.
20004,218
20103,843−8.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]

At the 2010 census Arnold had a population of 3,843. The population density was 258.8 people per square mile (99.9/km2). The racial makeup of Arnold was 3,590 (93.4%) White, 20 (0.5%) African American, 28 (0.7%) Native American, 46 (1.2%) Asian, 7 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 60 (1.6%) from other races, and 96 (2.5%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 259 people (6.7%).[8]

The census reported that 3,842 people (100% of the population) lived in households, no one lived in non-institutionalized group quarters and 1 (0%) were institutionalized.

There were 1,761 households, 340 (19.3%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 1,024 (58.1%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 113 (6.4%) had a female householder with no husband present, 50 (2.8%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 87 (4.9%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 11 (0.6%) same-sex married couples or partnerships; 472 households (26.8%) were one person and 201 (11.4%) had someone living alone who was 65 or older. The average household size was 2.18. There were 1,187 families (67.4% of households); the average family size was 2.60.

The age distribution was 613 people (16.0%) under the age of 18, 184 people (4.8%) aged 18 to 24, 563 people (14.7%) aged 25 to 44, 1,436 people (37.4%) aged 45 to 64, and 1,047 people (27.2%) who were 65 or older. The median age was 54.1 years. For every 100 females, there were 104.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.8 males.

There were 4,897 housing units at an average density of 329.8 per square mile (127.3/km2),of which 1,761 were occupied, 1,422 (80.7%) by the owners and 339 (19.3%) by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 4.8%; the rental vacancy rate was 16.8%. 2,978 people (77.5% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 864 people (22.5%) lived in rental housing units.

Economy[edit]

Arnold has a chamber of commerce, the Greater Arnold Business Association.[9]

Parks and recreation[edit]

Arnold is located in Stanislaus National Forest. Parks located in the area include White Pines Park and Calaveras Big Trees State Park.[10] The Arnold Rim Trail, which was created in 2007, is a 17.5 mile multi-use trail that traverses protected land from Arnold to Avery.[11]

Government[edit]

In the state legislature, Arnold is in the 8th Senate District, represented by Republican Andreas Borgeas,[12] and the 5th Assembly District, represented by Republican Frank Bigelow.[13] Federally, Arnold is in California's 4th congressional district, represented by Republican Tom McClintock.[14]

State and federal grants following the Butte Fire have helped to thin overgrown brush in the area, and expand a bulldozed fire break created in the Butte Fire.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 19, 2017.
  2. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  3. ^ Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Clovis, Calif.: Word Dancer Press. p. 741. ISBN 1-884995-14-4.
  4. ^ a b c d Ryan Sabalow; Phillip Resent; Dale Kasler (April 14, 2019). "A real life gamble: California races to predict which town could be the next victim". Destined to Burn. Reno Gazette Journal. The Sacramento Bee. p. 1A.
  5. ^ Climate Summary for Arnold, California
  6. ^ "Weatherbase.com". Weatherbase. 2013. Retrieved on August 20, 2013.
  7. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2016.
  8. ^ "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA - Arnold CDP". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 15, 2014. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  9. ^ "About GABA". Arnold. Greater Arnold Business Association. Retrieved 30 August 2014.
  10. ^ "About Arnold". Arnold. Greater Arnold Business Association. Retrieved 30 August 2014.
  11. ^ "Arnold Rim Trail". Sierra Nevada Geotourism MapGuide. National Geographic. Retrieved 2 August 2015.
  12. ^ "Senators". State of California. Retrieved March 21, 2013.
  13. ^ "Members Assembly". State of California. Retrieved March 21, 2013.
  14. ^ "California's 4th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 2, 2013.