Attila Petschauer

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The native form of this personal name is Petschauer Attila. This article uses the Western name order.
Attila Petschauer
Petschauer Attila.jpg

Attila Petschauer (December 14, 1904 – January 30, 1943) was a Jewish Hungarian Olympic champion fencer.[2]

Fencing career[edit]

Born in Budapest, Petschauer was a member of the Hungarian fencing team in the 1928 and 1932 Olympics. Petschauer was regarded throughout the late 1920s and early 1930s as one of the world's top fencers.

Olympic career[edit]

In Amsterdam in 1928 he was part of the gold medal-winning Hungarian team in sabre, winning all 20 of his competition matches. In the individual sabre competition, Petschauer won the silver medal.[3]

In the 1932 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, Petschauer was again part of the champion Hungarian sabre team. The Hungarians won the gold medal in team sabre, and Petschauer finished 5th in individual sabre.[3]

Movie[edit]

Petschauer was tortured and murdered under orders of his Hungarian commanding officer during his service in a Hungarian-Jewish Forced Labor Batallion. [4] A fictionalized account of his life and death were dramatised in the 1999 film Sunshine, starring Ralph Fiennes.[3]

Hall of Fame[edit]

He was inducted into the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in 1985.[4]

Memorial event[edit]

The Attila Petschauer Event was begun in 1994 as a memorial to Petschauer by his descendant, Dr. Richard Markowitz. It is known across the United States as one of the top sabre events.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Attila Petschauer Olympic Results". sports-reference.com. Retrieved April 27, 2010. 
  2. ^ Paul Taylor. Jews and the Olympic Games: The Clash Between Sport and Politics - With a ... Retrieved January 23, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c "Petschauer, Attila". Jews In Sports. Retrieved 11 March 2016. 
  4. ^ a b "Attila Petschauer". Jewishsports.net. Retrieved April 20, 2010. 
  5. ^ "fencingcenterli.com". fencingcenterli.com. Retrieved April 20, 2010. 

External links[edit]