Bartłomiej Macieja

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Bartłomiej Macieja
GM Bartlomiej Macieja.JPG
Bartłomiej Macieja, Lublin 2010
Full name Bartłomiej Macieja
Country  Poland
Born (1977-10-04) 4 October 1977 (age 39)
Warsaw, Poland
Title Grandmaster
FIDE rating 2529 (March 2017)
Peak rating 2653 (January 2004)

Bartłomiej Macieja (born 4 October 1977) is a chess Grandmaster from Poland.

Career[edit]

Born in Warsaw, he was Polish Under-18 champion in 1994, and National champion of Poland in 2004 and 2009.

In 1995, he won in Zlín and in 1996, finished first in Budapest. He tied for 1st-4th places with Liviu-Dieter Nisipeanu, Vlastimil Babula and Zoltán Almási at the Krynica 1998 (zonal tournament). A four times qualifier for the FIDE World Championship finals (Las Vegas 1999, New Delhi 2000, Moscow 2001 and Tripoli 2004), at Delhi he beat Jonathan Speelman, Michał Krasenkow, and Alexander Beliavsky but lost in 4th round to Viswanathan Anand.[1][2][3][4]

Macieja won the European Championship at Batumi 2002[5] and tied for 2nd-3rd with Viktor Korchnoi, behind Alexei Shirov, at Reykjavík 2003. He was 5-times European Team Vice-Champion (1997, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005).

In 2003, Macieja played an 8 games match against former world champion Karpov which he lost 6-2.[6]

He played for Poland in six Chess Olympiads.

Awarded the International Master title in 1996, and the Grandmaster title in 1999.

Currently he plays at Alzicapital's team in Spain, national champion in 2010.

In opening theory, Macieja has made contributions to the Classical Variation of the Nimzo Indian Defense. After 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Qc2 c5 5.dxc5 0-0 6.a3 Bxc5 7.Nf3, Macieja popularized 7...b6. David Vigorito has called this line the "Macieja Variation" and considers it Black's best try in the 4...c5 defense against 4.Qc2.[7]

External links[edit]

References[edit]