Conjure One

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Conjure One
Rhys Fulber in 2015
Rhys Fulber in 2015
Background information
OriginVancouver, British Columbia and Amsterdam
Genres
Years active1997–present
LabelsNettwerk, Armada
MembersRhys Fulber
Websiteconjureone.com

Conjure One is a Canadian electronic music project, headed by Rhys Fulber,[1] better known as a member of Front Line Assembly and Delerium.

History[edit]

After performing with Front Line Assembly at the 1996 Roskilde Festival, Fulber left the band to pursue a solo career. He set up a studio in Amsterdam; the influence of life there, and traveling to the Eastern Mediterranean, gave him the idea of an ethnic ambient project. Soon after, a debut album was announced, though Fulber's work as a producer and remixer eventually pushed its release to September 2002.

The self-titled album was a fusion of the electronic characteristics of Fulber's previous work—keyboard-based, with rhythmic dance beats—and the influences of Middle Eastern music, which inspired ambient melodies more reminiscent of Delerium.

A number of songs were more pop-oriented and featured guest vocalists, primarily Poe and Chemda, the latter singing entirely in Arabic. Sinéad O'Connor and Jeff Martin of The Tea Party were also featured.

After returning to Front Line Assembly and Delerium, in 2005 Fulber released a second album entitled Extraordinary Ways. This album utilized much more contemporary sounds, including much greater prominence given to guitars and trip hop-like beats. Vocalists included Tiff Lacey, Poe (credited as "Jane"), Chemda, Joanna Stevens,, and Fulber himself (covering a song by the punk band Buzzcocks).

In 2007, Sandra Cretu covered "Sleep" as a bonus track on her single "The Way I Am".

2012 saw Fulber sign to Dutch dance label, Armada Music, and work began on what became the Holoscenic album.

Discography[edit]

Albums[edit]

Singles[edit]


Collaborations[edit]

Remixes[edit]


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 117. ISBN 1-904994-10-5.

External links[edit]