Dean Winslow

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Dean Winslow
Col Dean Winslow in Baghdad, 2008.jpg
Birth name Dean Lindley Winslow
Born 1953
Wood River, Illinois
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch  United States Air Force
US-AirNationalGuard-2007Emblem.svg Air National Guard
Years of service 1980–2015
Rank US-O6 insignia.svg Colonel

Dean Winslow (born ca. 1953) is an American physician, academic, and retired United States Air Force colonel. He had been nominated by President Donald Trump to become the next Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, but he withdrew his nomination in December 2017 after it was put on indefinite hold. He is Professor and former Vice Chair of Medicine at Stanford University. He previously served as Chair of the Department of Medicine and Chief of the Division of AIDS Medicine at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center. In the Air Force, he deployed twice to Afghanistan and four times to Iraq as a flight surgeon supporting combat operations in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom.[1]

Early life and education[edit]

Winslow was born in Illinois to Don Winslow, a patent attorney, and Anna Neff Winslow, a public school teacher. Winslow graduated from Dover High School in 1971. He received his undergraduate degree from Pennsylvania State University, where he ran varsity track and cross-country. In 1976, Winslow received his doctorate from Jefferson Medical College. He completed medical fellowships with the Christiana Care Health System and Oschner Foundation Hospital. In 1983, Winslow graduated with distinction as a flight surgeon from the United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine. He graduated from the United States Air Force's Air War College in 2007.[2]

Career[edit]

Winslow’s career has spanned private practice, basic research, drug and diagnostic device development, HIV medicine, military and aerospace medicine, public health, and academics. He has held numerous leadership positions in these fields.

In 2016, Winslow won a wrongful termination lawsuit against a California civilian hospital and donated the $1 million settlement to agencies that help war refugees and their children in places like Iraq and Syria [3]

Winslow is an Episcopalian and has served on the vestry of the Church of the Epiphany of San Carlos, California.

Military awards[edit]

Winslow’s decorations and awards include:

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Badge (top)
Chief Flight Surgeon badge
1st row Legion of Merit
2nd row Meritorious Service Medal with two 516" Gold Stars Air Medal with two oak leaf clusters Aerial Achievement Medal with three oak leaf clusters Air Force Commendation Medal with two oak leaf clusters
3rd row Air Force Combat Action Medal Meritorious Unit Award with one oak leaf cluster Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Air Force Organizational Excellence Award
4th row Combat Readiness Medal National Defense Service Medal with one 316" bronze star Antarctica Service Medal Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal with one 316" bronze star
5th row Southwest Asia Service Medal with one 316" bronze star Afghanistan Campaign Medal with two 316" bronze stars Iraq Campaign Medal with four 316" bronze stars Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal
6th row Global War on Terrorism Service Medal Humanitarian Service Medal with one 316" bronze star Air Force Overseas Ribbon with one oak leaf cluster Air Force Expeditionary Service Ribbon with gold frame and four oak leaf clusters
7th row Air Force Longevity Service Ribbon with four oak leaf clusters Armed Forces Reserve Medal with two “M” devices not pictured Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon with one 316" bronze star indicating expert qualification on service rifle and pistol Air Force Training Ribbon
8th row Non-Article 5 NATO Medal for service with ISAF Delaware Conspicuous Service Cross Delaware National Guard Medal for Military Merit with award numeral 2 Delaware National Guard Medal
9th row Delaware National Guard National Defense Service Ribbon Delaware National Guard Medal for Service in Aid to Civil Authority Delaware National Guard Physical Fitness Ribbon with award numeral 16 not pictured Louisiana Legion of Merit
10th row Louisiana Emergency Service Medal Louisiana General Excellence Ribbon with three oak leaf clusters Louisiana Longevity Medal with three oak leaf clusters Mississippi Emergency Service Medal

In addition to the above decorations, Winslow received the Malcolm C. Grow Award as Outstanding Air Force Flight Surgeon (ANG Command) in 1988 and the Air Force Association’s George W. Bush Award as outstanding ANG officer in 2006. His aeronautical rating is Chief Flight Surgeon and he has logged 1150 military flying hours including 431 combat hours and 263 combat sorties. Aircraft flown include the F-4, F-15, F-16, CF-18, A-37, T-38, C-5, C-12, C-17, C-130, MC-130, C-131, C-141, E-3, KC-10, KC-135, UH-1, UH-60, HH-60, and CH-47.

Nomination to become Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs[edit]

In September 2017, President Donald Trump nominated Winslow to become the next Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs. Winslow's nomination was put on indefinite hold, and Winslow withdrew from consideration in December 2017. The day after the November 2017 Sutherland Springs church shooting, when asked about the tragedy, Winslow said "I'd also like to ... just say how insane it is that in the United States of America a civilian can go out and buy a semi-automatic weapon like an AR-15." After his nomination was put on indefinite hold, Winslow wrote an editorial in the Washington Post titled "I spoke my mind on guns. Then my Senate confirmation was put on hold" In the editorial, he wrote: "I have seen what [assault weapons like the AR-15] do to human beings. The injuries are devastating."[4]

His nomination for Assistant Secretary of Defense was not formally withdrawn by President Trump but was instead returned unconfirmed to the President by the U.S. Senate on 3 January 2018 under Standing Rules of the United States Senate, Rule XXXI, paragraph 6.[5]

Personal life[edit]

Winslow is married and has four children. He holds an Airline Transport Pilot license and type ratings in the Boeing 737, Douglas DC-3, the L-29 Delfin, and L-39 Albatross jets.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "President Donald J. Trump Announces Intent to Nominate Personnel to Key Administration Posts". The White House. September 2, 2017. Retrieved 4 October 2017.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. ^ a b "Dean Winslow". Stanford University. Retrieved 5 October 2017. 
  3. ^ https://www.airforcetimes.com/news/your-air-force/2016/05/07/air-guardsman-donates-1-million-to-refugees-children-in-war-torn-countries/
  4. ^ Winslow, Dean (20 December 2017). "I spoke my mind on guns. Then my Senate confirmation was put on hold". Washington Post. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  5. ^ "PN892 — Dean L. Winslow — Department of Defense". U.S. Congress. 3 January 2018. Retrieved 11 January 2018. 

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