Dhar (surname)

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Dhar also spelled Dar is a Kashmiri surname (kram), found among Muslims (from Pandit lineage) & Hindu Pandits[1][2][3][4][5] native to the Kashmir Valley of India,[5] as well as Kashmiri émigrés who have migrated to the Punjab,[6][7] a region divided between India and neighbouring Pakistan.[8] Hindu Dhars / Dars today hold a kayastha status (both Brahmin & kshatriya) because of their ancestors.[9] The Dhar kram originates from the honorific given to a village head, strongman or a warlord of a jagir.[10][11][12] This honorific was prevalent during the 12th Century A.D. and remained in vogue up until the 14th Century A.D.[13] In antiquity, many Dhars migrated to the region of Gauda (present day Bengal), and much later returned to the Kashmir Valley.[14] Nevertheless, to this day, there are many Bengali Kayasthas of the Dhar clan who are found in that region of Bengal.[15]

History and origins[edit]

According to one explanation, the Dhar kram originates from the honorific given to a village head, strongman or a warlord of a jagir.[16][11][17] This title was often used in the 12th century and stayed fashionable up until the 14th century.[13] According to one theory, by a Kashmiri writer, many Dhars migrated to Gauda, and a large amount later returned to the Kashmir Valley.[18]

Notables[edit]

Pakistani sportspeople[edit]

Pakistani politicians[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ D. D. (Dhruv Dev). Sharma. Panorama of Indian Anthroponomy: An Historical, Socio-Cultural and Linguistic Analysis of Indian Personal Names. Mittal Publication. Retrieved 25 March 2007. Similar is the case of Hindus and Christians in Kerala, eg (Krisna Panikkar; George Panikkar), and Hindus and Muslims in Kashmir or Hindus and Sikhs in Punjab who have many common surnames, eg (Kashmir) : Bhat, Dar, Malik, Rana, Pandit (Saleem Pandit), etc. and (Punjab): Arora, Bedi, Kapoor, Bjaj, Sahney, Maini, Ahloowalia, etc. In such cases reference to a person by his surname, as Mr. Bhat or Mr. Arora does not indicate whether the person under reference is a Hindu, a Muslim or a Sikh. 
  2. ^ Arjun Ray. Kashmir diary: psychology of militancy. Manas Publications. Retrieved 25 March 2007. This is peculiar to Kashmir only. • Hindu surnames like Dar, Rishi, Pandit, ... 
  3. ^ Bulletin of the Deccan College Research Institute, Volumes 62–63. Dr. A. M. Ghatage. Retrieved 25 March 2007. Hence Kashmiri speech community can be viewed as the population united by sharing social norms; acquire Kashmiri as their native language; and use Kashmiri language to meet ... The surnames like Bhat, Pandit, Munshi, Dhar, Dar, Handoo, ... 
  4. ^ Saligram Bhatt; Jānakīnātha Kaula. Kashmiri Pandits, a cultural heritage. Lancer Book. Retrieved 25 March 2007. Incidentally it may be stated that many Kashmiri Muslims still have the surnames of the pandits, like Kaul, Bhatt, Pandit, Dar, etc. With the accession to throne of Hari Singh in 1925, the State was given a 'new look'. 
  5. ^ a b Explore Kashmiri Pandits. Dharma Publications. Retrieved 2 December 2010. 
  6. ^ A Glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North-West Frontier Province. Nirmal Publishers and Distributors. Retrieved 25 March 2007. The most important Kashmiri element in the Punjab is found in the cities of Ludhiana and Amritsar, which still contain large colonies of weavers, employed in weaving carpets and finer fabrics. 
  7. ^ Kashmiris' contribution to Ludhianvi culture. The Tribune. Retrieved 25 March 2007. In fact, the Ludhiana hosiery industry owes its origin to Kashmiris. According to the Ludhiana District Gazetteer, during a devastating famine in the 19th century a number of Kashmiris migrated to Ludhiana. They are known world over for their handicraft skills. They started weaving woollen fabric here. Slowly the trade got popular and Ludhiana started to be identified with hosiery only. 
  8. ^ P.D.B.J. Meerbach. Relating Farmers' Practices to Cotton Yields in the South-Punjab, Pakistan. Department of Irrigation and Soil and Water Conservation, Wageningen Agricultural University. Retrieved 25 March 2007. With the inception of Pakistan, the Punjab has been divided into two parts: west Punjab (Pakistan) and east Punjab (India). 
  9. ^ Brower, Barbara; Johnston, Barbara Rose (2016-09-17). Disappearing Peoples?: Indigenous Groups and Ethnic Minorities in South and Central Asia. Routledge. ISBN 9781315430393. 
  10. ^ Saligram Bhatt. Kashmiri Scholars Contribution to Knowledge and World Peace. A.P.H. Publishing Corporation. Retrieved 25 March 2007. The genesis in outline is that Dhar was the honorific given to a village head, strongman or a warlord of smaller jagir/estate; called Dara pronounced as Dhara. This honorific was prevalent during 12th Century {Jaisimha} and continue to be used till about 14th Century. 
  11. ^ a b Kumar Suresh Singh; Tapash Kumar Ghosh; Surendra Nath. People of India: Delhi. Anthropological Survey of India. Retrieved 25 March 2007. Some of their surnames are derived from location, occupation, tide, status, family history and so. These are Kaul, Dhar, ... 
  12. ^ Barbara Anne Brower; Barbara Rose Johnston. Disappearing peoples?: indigenous groups and ethnic minorities in South and Central Asia. Left Coast Press. Retrieved 25 March 2007. Their surnames (kram) designate their original professions or their ancestors' nicknames (eg, Hakim, Kaul, Dhar, Raina, ... 
  13. ^ a b Saligram Bhatt. Kashmiri Scholars Contribution to Knowledge and World Peace. A.P.H. Publishing Corporation. Retrieved 25 March 2007. The genesis in outline is that Dhar was the honorific given to a village head, strongman or a warlord of smaller jagir/estate; called Dara pronounced as Dhara. This honorific was prevalent during 12th Century {Jaisimha} and continue to be used till about 14th Century. 
  14. ^ Saligram Bhatt. Kashmiri Scholars Contribution to Knowledge and World Peace. A.P.H. Publishing Corporation. Retrieved 25 March 2007. Dhar's were those who migrated to Gauda {Bengal} and retained their Dhar surname once they returned to the valley. 
  15. ^ Jogendra Nath Bhattacharya. Hindu Castes and Sects: An Exposition of the Origin of the Hindu Caste System and the Bearing of the Sects Towards Each Other and Towards Other Religious Systems. Nabu Press. Dhar–A Surname–1. (1) Of the Dakshin Rarhi Kayasthas of Bengal–179. (2) Of the Bangaja Kayasthas of East Bengal–184. (3) Of the Barendra Kayasthas of North bengal–184. 
  16. ^ Saligram Bhatt. Kashmiri Scholars Contribution to Knowledge and World Peace. A.P.H. Publishing Corporation. Retrieved 25 March 2007. The genesis in outline is that Dhar was the honorific given to a village head, strongman or warlord of smaller jagir/estate; called Dara pronounced as Dhara. This honorific was prevalent during 12th Century (Jaisimha) and continued to be used till about 14th Century. [italics in the original] 
  17. ^ Barbara Anne Brower; Barbara Rose Johnston. Disappearing peoples?: indigenous groups and ethnic minorities in South and Central Asia. Left Coast Press. Retrieved 25 March 2007. Their surnames (kram) designate their original professions or their ancestors' nicknames (e.g., Hakim, Kaul, Dhar, Raina, ... 
  18. ^ Saligram Bhatt. Kashmiri Scholars Contribution to Knowledge and World Peace. A.P.H. Publishing Corporation. Retrieved 25 March 2007. A recent article by a Kashmeeri writer has propounded that Dhar's were those who migrated to Gauda {Bengal} and retained their Dhar surname once they returned to the valley.