Don Verlin

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Don Verlin
Don Verlin in 2015.jpg
Verlin in 2015.
Current position
Record177–176 (.501)
Biographical details
Born (1965-06-15) June 15, 1965 (age 54)
Roseville, California
Alma materStanislaus State ('91)
Colorado State ('93)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1983–1984Del Oro HS (freshmen)
1984–1985Placer HS (JV)
1989–1991Columbia (CA) (asst.)
1991–1992Colorado State (asst.)
1992–1994Cal State Bakersfield (asst.)
1994–1998Colorado State (asst.)
1998–2008Utah State (asst.)
2008–2019Idaho
Head coaching record
Overall177–176 (.501)

Donald Gene Verlin (born June 15, 1965) is an American college basketball coach who was the men's basketball head coach at the University of Idaho from 2008 to 2019. In June 2019, Verlin was fired for cause by the university administration following an investigation into NCAA violations. Verlin had been placed on administrative leave since late May 2019 due to the investigation; assistant coach Zac Claus will serve as interim coach for the 2019-2020 season.[1] Previously, he was an assistant coach at Colorado State, Utah State, and Cal State Bakersfield.

Early life and education[edit]

Born in Roseville, California, Verlin graduated from Del Oro High School in Loomis, California in 1983. Verlin graduated from California State University, Stanislaus in 1991 with a bachelor's degree in physical education and Colorado State University in 1993 with a master's degree in education.[2]

Coaching career[edit]

With his twin brother Ron, Don Verlin was freshman basketball co-head coach at Del Oro High for a season after graduating from high school before coaching junior varsity one season at Placer High School.[3]

Verlin then coached from 1989 to 1991 at the junior college level, as an assistant at Columbia College in Sonora, California. Later, Verlin moved up to the NCAA as an assistant at Colorado State under Stew Morrill in the 1991–92 season.[2] Then, from 1992 to 1994, Verlin was an assistant at Cal State Bakersfield under Pat Douglass for back-to-back NCAA Division II championship seasons.[2]

In 1994, Verlin rejoined Colorado State, again under Stew Morrill, as an assistant and stayed for four seasons. Verlin followed Morrill to Utah State in 1998. In ten seasons with Utah State, Verlin helped Utah State reach eight postseason appearances and eight 20-plus win seasons.[4]

Personal life[edit]

Don Verlin is married and has two children,[2] and his twin brother Ron was also a college basketball coach, most recently at the University of the Pacific.[5]

Head coaching record[edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Idaho Vandals (Western Athletic Conference) (2008–2014)
2008–09 Idaho 17–16 9–7 T–3rd CIT Quarterfinals
2009–10 Idaho 15–16 6–10 T–6th
2010–11 Idaho 18–14 9–7 T–3rd CIT First Round
2011–12 Idaho 19–14 9–5 3rd CIT Second Round
2012–13 Idaho 12–18 7–11 6th
2013–14 Idaho 16–18 7–9 T–5th  
Idaho (WAC): 97–96 (.503) 47–49 (.490)
Idaho Vandals (Big Sky Conference) (2014–present)
2014–15 Idaho 13–17 8–10 T–7th
2015–16 Idaho 21–13 12–6 3rd CBI First Round
2016–17 Idaho 19–14 12–6 T–3rd CIT Second Round
2017–18 Idaho 22–9 14–4 2nd
2018–19 Idaho 5–27 2–18 11th
Idaho (Big Sky): 80–80 (.500) 48–44 (.522)
Idaho: 177–176 (.501) 95–93 (.505)
Total: 177–176 (.501)

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kyle Cajero (June 14, 2019). "Idaho fires men's basketball head coach Don Verlin". SBNation. Retrieved June 15, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d "Don Verlin". Idaho Vandals. Retrieved November 11, 2017.
  3. ^ Modhorst, Todd (March 11, 2005). "Verlins share a bittersweet rivalry". Auburn Journal. Retrieved November 29, 2016.
  4. ^ "Don Verlin". Utah State Aggies. 2007. Retrieved November 29, 2016.
  5. ^ "Ron Verlin". University of the Pacific. 2015.

External links[edit]