Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu

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Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu
Gurrumul in November 2012
Gurrumul in November 2012
Background information
Born(1971-01-22)22 January 1971
Elcho Island, Northern Territory, Australia
Died25 July 2017(2017-07-25) (aged 46)
Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia
Genres
Occupation(s)
  • Singer
  • songwriter
  • musician
Instrument(s)
Years active1986–2017
LabelsSkinnyfish Music
Websitewww.gurrumul.com

Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu (22 January 1971 – 25 July 2017), commonly known as Gurrumul and also referred to since his death as Dr G. Yunupingu,[note 1][5][6][7] was a Yolŋu Aboriginal Australian musician.[8] A multi-instrumentalist, he played drums, keyboards, guitar (a right-hand-strung guitar played left-handed) and didgeridoo, but it was the clarity of his singing voice that attracted rave reviews. He sang stories of his land both in Yolŋu languages such as Gaalpu, Gumatj or Djambarrpuynu, a dialect related to Gumatj, and in English.[8][9] He began his career as a member of Yothu Yindi and later Saltwater Band, and his solo career brought him wider acclaim[8] He was the most commercially successful Aboriginal Australian musician at the time of his death.[8] As of 2020, it is estimated that Yunupingu has sold half a million records globally.[10]

Life and career[edit]

Early life (1971–1989)[edit]

The first of four sons born to Ganyinurra (Daisy), of the Gumal clan, and Nyambi "Terry" Yunupingu, a Gumatj clansman,[11] Yunupingu was born blind in Galiwin'ku, Elcho Island, in 1971,[12] situated off the coast of Arnhem Land in northern Australia, about 530 kilometres (330 mi) east of Darwin. When he was four years old, he taught himself how to play a toy piano and an accordion. A year later he began to play a guitar; despite being a left-hander, he played a right-handed guitar, holding it upside down, which he would continue to do throughout his career.[8] His friend, spokesperson, and collaborator Michael Hohnen described his early musical experiences as follows: "Gurrumul was educated by immersion, cultural immersion—from his aunties, parents and grandmothers, with love and lullabies; from his uncles, fathers and grandfathers through ceremony songs and storytelling, much of it through music. Throughout his childhood, he was built, given or bought tin cans, sticks, toy keyboards, piano accordions, nylon string guitars, and, later, clap sticks (bilma) and didgeridoos (yidaki). He learned foot stomping calling and whooping, vocalisations of traditional songs and their different sounds, and so much more."[13] He later sang hymns in the mission choir and also enjoyed Western pop music, particularly Dire Straits, Cliff Richard, and Stevie Wonder.[5] An adventurous child, he was taught how to play basketball and ride a push-bike around his community.[14] He left school at the age of 12, having attended his local school, Shepherdson College, along with a brief stint at an institute in the Victorian city of Geelong for instruction in Braille, which did not interest him.[13]

Career (1989–2017)[edit]

Gurrumul playing at the West Coast Blues & Roots Festival (2011)

In 1989, at the age of 18, Yunupingu joined Yothu Yindi as a multi-instrumentalist and backing vocalist, notably contributing to their 1991 album, Tribal Voice. He left the group in 1995 to live full-time on Elcho Island and later co-founded and co-led the Saltwater Band, which was active from 1999 to 2009.[5][8][15][16] His first solo album, Gurrumul, was released in 2008, debuting at No. 69 on the ARIA Charts and No. 1 on the independent chart.[17] Gurrumul peaked at No. 3 on the ARIA Charts.[18] The album was certified triple platinum.[8] Yunupingu's friend Michael Hohnen produced the album and was his translator, collaborator and confidant. Critics heaped praise on the singer, describing his voice as having "transcendental beauty". Elton John, Sting and Björk were among his fans. The money he made was largely shared with his family, following the Aboriginal tradition of sharing wealth.[19][20] He did not generally give interviews, instead relying on Hohnen to speak for him, following a Yolŋu custom that dictated that Yunupingu's role was only to sing, while his elders spoke publicly. In a 2009 interview with him and Hohnen, Yunupingu said that he was generally shy but more comfortable playing music, and went on to say: "I don't have much to say to people when I talk. That is for other Yolŋu. But I can play and sing and tell people things through my songs. We have an encyclopedia of stories ready to tell people, if they want to listen."[21]

In 2008 Yunupingu was nominated for four ARIA Awards,[22] winning the awards for Best World Music Album[23] and Best Independent Release.[24] He also won three Deadlys, winning for Artist of the Year, Album of the Year for Gurrumul and Single of the Year for "Gurrumul History (I Was Born Blind)".[25]

In November 2009, Yunupingu was named Best New Independent Artist and his album, Gurrumul, Best Independent Release and Best Independent Blues/Roots Release at the Australian Independent Record (AIR) Awards held at Melbourne's Corner Hotel.[26] In 2009 a portrait of Yunupingu by Guy Maestri won Australia's major art prize, the Archibald Prize.[27]

He was again awarded the Australian Independent Record (AIR) Award for Best Independent Blues and Roots Album in 2011 for his album Rrakala.[8][28] At the ARIA Music Awards of 2011, he won Best World Music Album and performed "Warwu" featuring Missy Higgins on piano.[29] In 2019, Double J's Dan Condon described it as one of "7 great performances from the history of the ARIA Awards."[29]

In 2012, Yunupingu was one of the contributing vocalists on Gary Barlow's commemorative single "Sing" for Queen Elizabeth II's diamond jubilee celebrations, which features artists from across the Commonwealth. He performed "Sing" live at the Diamond Jubilee Concert on 4 June 2012 together with many of the song's contributing artists.[30][8] In 2012, Yunupingu was conferred with an Honorary Doctorate of Music by the University of Sydney.[8]

In 2013, Yunupingu joined Delta Goodrem for a special performance of "Bayini" on The Voice Australia.[31] In December 2013, Yunupingu released a live album, titled His Life and Music, which was recorded in the Sydney Opera House and released through ABC Music. It was nominated for Australian Independent Record Labels Association and ARIA awards.[32] "Bayini" became the first track by an indigenous musician to reach the top five of the Australian charts.[8]

In 2015, Yunupingu toured the US.[33] He released his third studio album, The Gospel Album, on 31 July 2015. It debuted at number 3 on the ARIA Charts. In October 2015, the album won Gurrumul's third ARIA Award for Best World Music Album.[34]

In July 2016, Yunupingu featured on the A.B. Original track "Take Me Home".[35]

Death (2017)[edit]

Yunupingu died at the Royal Darwin Hospital, Northern Territory, at about 5:00 pm on 25 July 2017, aged 46.[7] He had lived with liver and kidney damage for many years due to hepatitis B which he had contracted in childhood.[8] On his death he was described as an important figure in fostering racial harmony and as a voice of Indigenous Australians.[8] He received tributes from the Australian prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull, fellow musician Peter Garrett, and Anna Reid, the dean of the Sydney Conservatorium of Music.[8]

Posthumous releases and recognition (2018–present)[edit]

In April 2018, Yunupingu's fourth studio album, Djarimirri (Child of the Rainbow), was released. It was an album four years in the making and was completed by producer and arranger Michael Hohnen.[36] A documentary film titled Gurrumul was also released, which Luke Buckmaster reviewed, stating that "For Gurrumul fans, the film is obviously a must-see. For those unfamiliar, or vaguely familiar with his work, it's an even greater treat: they will be entertained, enthralled, perhaps in some small way changed."[37] The album won four ARIA Music Awards at the 2018 ceremony; his daughter Jasmin accepted the award for Best Male Artist on his behalf.[38]

In November 2020, Decca Records announced they had signed to the rights to Yunupingu's catalogue and future recordings, announcing forthcoming releases, including limited-edition vinyls, a box set and collaborations among a slate of projects.[10] In December 2020, Yunupingu was listed at number 33 in Rolling Stone Australia's "50 Greatest Australian Artists of All Time" issue.[39]

In September 2021, Yunupingu's first anthology was released, entitled The Gurrumul Story.[40] In the same year, a species of frog from the Wessel Islands, Northern Territory, was named Uperoleia gurrumuli (Gurrumul's toadlet) in honour of Yunupingu.[41][42]

Discography[edit]

Studio albums[edit]

Title Details Peak chart positions Certifications
AUS
[43]
BEL
(FL)

[44]
FRA
[45]
GER
[46]
NL
[47]
SWI
[48]
Gurrumul
  • Released: February 2008
  • Label: Skinnyfish Music (SFGU080201)
  • Formats: CD, digital download
3 13 60 9 54 10
Rrakala
  • Released: 15 April 2011
  • Label: Skinnyfish Music (SFGU110402)
  • Formats: CD, digital download
3 85 34
The Gospel Album
  • Released: 31 July 2015
  • Label: Skinnyfish Music (SFGU150803)
  • Formats: CD, digital download
3
Djarimirri (Child of the Rainbow)
  • Released: 13 April 2018
  • Label: Skinnyfish Music (SFGU180413)
  • Formats: CD, digital download
1
"—" denotes releases that did not chart or were not released in that territory.

Live albums[edit]

Title Details Peak chart positions
AUS
[43]
Live in Darwin, Australia
  • Released: 16 July 2010
  • Label: Dramatico / Skinnyfish Music (0063)
  • Formats: CD, digital download
His Life and Music
(with the Sydney Symphony Orchestra)
  • Released: 6 December 2013
  • Label: Universal / Skinnyfish Music (3764720)
  • Formats: CD, digital download
48
"—" denotes releases that did not chart or were not released in that territory.

Compilation albums[edit]

Title Details Peak chart positions
AUS
[43]
The Gurrumul Story
  • Released: 10 September 2021
  • Label: Decca (3586209)
  • Formats: CD, LP, CD + DVD, streaming, digital download
34
[51]

Awards and nominations[edit]

AIR Awards[edit]

The Australian Independent Record Awards (commonly known informally as AIR Awards) is an annual awards night to recognise, promote and celebrate the success of Australia's Independent Music sector.

Year Nominee / work Award Result
2008[52][53] himself Best New Independent Album Won
Gurrumul Best Independent Album Won
Best Independent Blues and Roots Album Won
2011[53] Rrakala Best Independent Blues and Roots Album Won
2014[53] His Life and Music Best Independent Classical Album Won
2015 The Gospel Album Best Independent Blues and Roots Album Nominated
2019[54] Djarimirri Best Independent Album/EP Won
Best Independent Classical Album Nominated
himself Best Independent Artist Nominated

APRA Awards[edit]

The APRA Awards are presented annually from 1982 by the Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA), "honouring composers and songwriters".[55]

Year Nominee / work Award Result
1991 "Treaty" by Yothu Yindi (co-written by Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu) Song of the Year[56] Won
2009 Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu Breakthrough Song Writer[57] Won
2014 "Bayini" by Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu (Rrawun D Maymuru) Song of the Year[58] Shortlisted

ARIA Music Awards[edit]

The ARIA Music Awards is an annual awards ceremony that recognises excellence, innovation, and achievement across all genres of Australian music. Gurrumul has won 9 awards from 21 nominations.[59]

Year Nominee / work Award Result
2008 Gurrumul Best Independent Release Won
Best World Music Album Won
Best Male Artist Nominated
Album of the Year Nominated
Michael Hohnen and Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu for Gurrumul Producer of the Year Nominated
2011 Rrakala Best Independent Release Nominated
Best World Music Album Won
Best Male Artist Nominated
Album of the Year Nominated
Best Cover Art Nominated
"Gopuru" (directed by Carlo Santone) Best Video Nominated
2014 His Life and Music (with Sydney Symphony Orchestra) Best Male Artist Nominated
Best Original Soundtrack/Cast/Show Album Won
2015 The Gospel Album Best World Music Album Won
2018 Djarimirri (Child of the Rainbow) Album of the Year Nominated
Best Male Artist Won
Best Independent Release Won
Best World Music Album Won
Best Cover Art Won
Michael Hohnen for Djarimirri (Child of the Rainbow) Producer of the Year Nominated
Ted Howard, Robin Mai & Matthew Cunliffe for Djarimirri (Child of the Rainbow) Engineer of the Year Nominated

Australian Music Prize[edit]

The Australian Music Prize (AMP) is an annual award of $30,000 given to an Australian band or solo artist in recognition of the merit of an album released during the year of award. The award commenced in 2005.

Year Nominee / work Award Result
2011[60] Rrakala Australian Music Prize Nominated
2018[61] Djarimirri Australian Music Prize Won

J Award[edit]

The J Awards are an annual series of Australian music awards that were established by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's youth-focused radio station Triple J. They commenced in 2005.

Year Nominee / work Award Result
J Awards of 2018[62] himself Double J Artist of the Year Won

Helpmann Awards[edit]

The Helpmann Awards is an awards show, celebrating live entertainment and performing arts in Australia, presented by industry group Live Performance Australia since 2001.[63] Note: 2020 and 2021 were cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Year Nominee / work Award Result Ref.
2009 Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu Helpmann Award for Best Australian Contemporary Concert Won [64]

National Indigenous Music Awards[edit]

The National Indigenous Music Awards recognise excellence, innovation and leadership among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander musicians from throughout Australia. It commenced in 2004.

Year Nominee / work Award Result
2005 himself Male Artist of the Year Won
2008 Gurrumul Album of the Year Won
Cover Art of the Year Won
"Wiyathul" Song of the Year Won
himself Artist of the Year Won
2009 Gurrumul Cover Art of the Year Won
Gurrumul Geoffrey Yunupingu – "Bapa" DVD/ Film Clip of the Year Nominated
himself Artist of the Year Won
2010 "History" Film Clip of the Year Won
himself Artist of the Year Won
2011 Rrakala Album of the Year Won
Cover Art of the Year Won
"Mala Rrakala" Song of the year Nominated
"Gathu Mawula" (featuring Blue King Brown) Won
Film Clip of the year Won
himself Artist of the year Won
2012 "Bayini" (featuring Sarah Blasko) Cover Art of the Year Won
Song of the Year Nominated
himself Artist of the year Won
2013 himself Special Recognition Award Won
himself Artist of the Year Nominated
"Bayini" (live) - with Delta Goodrem Song of the Year Nominated
"A Baru in New York" - with Yolanda Be Cool Nominated
2014 himself Artist of the Year Nominated
Album of the Year His Life and Music (with Sydney Symphony Orchestra) Nominated
Song of the Year "Marilitja" Nominated
2016 "The Children Came Back" Briggs and Dewayne Everettsmith (featuring Gurrumul) Song of the Year Won
Film Clip of the Year Nominated
himself Artist of the year Won
The Gospel Album Album of the Year Nominated
Best Cover Art of the Year Nominated
2018 Djarimirri (Child of the Rainbow) Album of the Year Won
"Djarimirri (Child of the Rainbow)" Song of the Year Won
himself Artist of the year Won
2022[65] Gurrumul Hall of Fame inductee

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Avoiding the use of a deceased person's first name is part of grieving practice amongst many Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.[1] Use of the title "Dr" is based on the honorary doctorate conferred in 2012 by the University of Sydney.[2] While most universities do not endorse the use of "Dr" as a title for holders of honorary doctorates, the use of the title helps distinguish between Gurrumul and his uncle Mandawuy Yunupingu who was often referred to after his death as "Mr Yunupingu".[3] This is also reflected in the obituary published in the New York Times, which refers to him as both Dr and Mr Yunupingu.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ McGrath, Pam (2008). "Australian findings on Aboriginal cultural practices associated with clothing, hair, possessions and use of name of deceased persons". International Journal of Nursing Practice. 14 (1): 57–66. doi:10.1111/j.1440-172X.2007.00667.x. PMID 18190485.
  2. ^ Honorary awards : Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, The University of Sydney. Last Updated: 17-Feb-2015. (Accessed 2017-08-18.)
  3. ^ Bardon, Jane (26 July 2017). "Dr G Yunupingu: Australia's most prominent Indigenous musician dies aged 46". ABC News. Retrieved 20 June 2019.
  4. ^ "Dr G. Yunupingu, Australian Aboriginal Singer, Dies at 46", The New York Times, Russell Goldman, 26 July 2017. (Accessed 18 August 2017) "Mr Yunupingu was awarded an honorary doctorate of music by the University of Sydney in 2012."
  5. ^ a b c "Dr G Yunupingu obituary". Guardian Australia. 26 July 2017. Retrieved 27 July 2017.
  6. ^ "Dr G Yunupingu: Australia's most prominent Indigenous musician dies aged 46". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 26 July 2017. Retrieved 27 July 2017.
  7. ^ a b "Singer Dr G. Yunupingu dies aged 46". The Australian. 26 July 2017. Retrieved 27 July 2017.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Marshallsea, Trevor (26 July 2017). "Dr G. Yunupingu: An exquisite singer who 'spoke to the soul'". BBC. Retrieved 26 July 2017.
  9. ^ "Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunipingu". dB Magazine. Archived from the original on 13 February 2012. Retrieved 26 July 2017.
  10. ^ a b "Decca Australia signs Gurrumul, new releases in pipeline". themusicnetwork. 10 November 2020. Retrieved 10 November 2020.
  11. ^ Hillman, Robert (1 August 2014). "Chapter 2: Arrival". Gurrumul. HarperCollins Australia. ISBN 978-1-74309-630-7.
  12. ^ "Australian indigenous singer Dr G. Yunupingu dies". BBC. 26 July 2017.
  13. ^ a b "Case Study: Inspiring Stories Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu". Music Australia. Archived from the original on 8 November 2022. Retrieved 18 September 2020.
  14. ^ Johnston, Tim (22 April 2008). "Aboriginal musician astonishes Australian audiences". International Herald Tribune. Retrieved 18 September 2020.
  15. ^ Fell, Samuel J. (14 April 2018). "Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu's legacy: why his music didn't stop". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 18 September 2020.
  16. ^ Ed Nimmervoll (ed.). "Yothu Yindi". HowlSpace. Archived from the original on 26 July 2012. Retrieved 22 January 2014.
  17. ^ National Indigenous Times – Issue 156 Gurrumul CDs to tap into UK Archived 23 October 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  18. ^ The ARIA Report issue 1021
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  21. ^ Sweeting, Adam (13 May 2009). "Gurrumul interview: the mystical heart of Australia". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 19 September 2020.
  22. ^ Aria Awards
  23. ^ SBS news Arnhem Land's Gurrumul wins ARIA award Archived 22 October 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  24. ^ News.com.au Archived 21 October 2008 at the Wayback Machine 2008 Aria Award Winners
  25. ^ Northern Territory News[dead link] Gurrumul Deadly at Awards
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  27. ^ "Archibald Prize 09". Art Gallery of New South Wales. 8 February 2010. Retrieved 29 October 2012.
  28. ^ Australian Independent Record Labels Association Ltd (AIR), 2012
  29. ^ a b Condon, Dan (26 November 2019). "7 Great Performances from the History of the ARIA Awards – Music Reads". Double J. Retrieved 24 December 2020.
  30. ^ "The Diamond Jubilee Official". 4 June 2012. Archived from the original on 8 October 2012.
  31. ^ McCabe, Kathy (27 May 2013). "Delta to sing Gurrumul's indigenous anthem Bayini on The Voice tonight". Herald Sun. Retrieved 2 June 2013.
  32. ^ "gurrumul-his-life-and-music-cd". ABC.net.au. December 2013. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  33. ^ "Gurrumul announces USA Tour 2015". www.skinnyfishmusic.com.au. Archived from the original on 26 July 2015. Retrieved 11 August 2015.
  34. ^ "Courtney Barnett, Hermitude, Tame Impala Lead 2015 ARIA Award Nominations". Nastassia Baroni. musicfeeds.com.au. 7 October 2015. Archived from the original on 10 October 2015. Retrieved 7 October 2015.
  35. ^ "Take Me Home single". iTunes Australia. 5 July 2016. Retrieved 22 January 2019.
  36. ^ "Djarimirri by Gurrumul". Readings. 26 March 2018. Retrieved 14 April 2018.
  37. ^ Luke Buckmaster, "Gurrumul review – stirring and soulful ode to Australia's most important voice", The Guardian, 15 February 2018.
  38. ^ Fryer, Brooke (29 November 2018). "'Really proud': Gurrumul claims four ARIA Awards for his final album". NITV. Retrieved 18 September 2020.
  39. ^ Ziggy Ramo (8 February 2021). "50 Greatest Australian Artists of All Time – number 33: Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu". Rolling Stone Australia. Retrieved 8 February 2021.
  40. ^ "The Gurrumul Story". JB Hi-Fi. Retrieved 7 August 2021.
  41. ^ "Uperoleia gurrumuli Catullo and Keogh, 2021 | Amphibian Species of the World". amphibiansoftheworld.amnh.org. Retrieved 4 June 2022.
  42. ^ "Uperoleia gurrumuli". www.frogid.net.au. Retrieved 4 June 2022.
  43. ^ a b c "Discography Gurrumul". Australian Charts Portal. Hung Medien.
  44. ^ "Discografie Gurrumul" (in Dutch). Belgian Charts Portal. Hung Medien. Retrieved 26 March 2018.
  45. ^ "Discographie Gurrumul". French Charts Portal. Hung Medien.
  46. ^ "Discographie Gurrumul". German Charts Portal. Hung Medien.
  47. ^ "Discografie Gurrumul" (in Dutch). Dutch Charts Portal. Hung Medien. Retrieved 26 March 2018.
  48. ^ "Discographie Gurrumul" (To access, select "charts" tab) (in German). Swiss Charts Portal. Hung Medien. Retrieved 26 March 2018.
  49. ^ "ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 2011 Albums". ARIA. Retrieved 26 March 2018.
  50. ^ "ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 2012 Albums". ARIA. Retrieved 26 March 2018.
  51. ^ "ARIA Top 50 Albums Chart". Australian Recording Industry Association. 11 October 2021. Retrieved 8 October 2021.
  52. ^ "2008 AIR AWARDS NOMINEES ANNOUNCED". Music NSW. 11 November 2008. Retrieved 19 August 2020.
  53. ^ a b c "History Wins". Australian Independent Record Labels Association. Archived from the original on 10 March 2016. Retrieved 18 August 2020.
  54. ^ "AIR Awards:2019 AIR Awards Winners Announced!". AIM. Retrieved 27 August 2019.
  55. ^ "APRA History". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA) | Australasian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society (AMCOS). Archived from the original on 20 September 2010. Retrieved 17 January 2011.
  56. ^ "1991 Awards". apraamcos. 11 August 2020.
  57. ^ "2009 Awards". apraamcos. 11 August 2020.
  58. ^ "2014 Shortlist Announced Awards". apraamcos. 11 August 2020.
  59. ^ "ARIA Awards Search Results - Gurrumul". ARIA Awards. Retrieved 21 October 2018.
  60. ^ "Winners & Shortlists". australian music prize. Retrieved 22 August 2020.
  61. ^ "gurrumul-wins-australian-music-prize". 2018. Retrieved 22 August 2020.
  62. ^ "The J Award 2018". Triple J. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 2018. Retrieved 15 August 2020.
  63. ^ "Events & Programs". Live Performance Australia. Retrieved 4 October 2022.
  64. ^ "2009 Helpmann Awards Nominees & Winners". Helpmann Awards. Australian Entertainment Industry Association (AEIA). Retrieved 8 October 2022.
  65. ^ "Gurrumul Is The 2022 NIMA Hall Of Fame Inductee". The Music. 3 August 2022. Retrieved 3 August 2022.

External links[edit]