High Sheriff of Londonderry City

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The High Sheriff of Londonderry City, or High Sheriff of Derry City, is the Sovereign's judicial representative in the city of Derry. The High Sheriff of Londonderry is a title and position which was created in 1900 under the Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898, with Sir John Barre Johnson the first holder. Like other high sheriff positions, it is largely a ceremonial post today. The appointment is officially made by the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland on behalf of the Queen. The outgoing High Sheriff nominates his or her successor, except in Belfast where councillors nominate a serving member of the city council. Prior to 1900 sheriffs, initially two per year but later only one, were elected by the city council.

History[edit]

Initially an office for lifetime, assigned by the Sovereign, the High Sheriff became annually appointed from the Provisions of Oxford in 1258.[1] Besides his judicial importance, he has ceremonial and administrative functions and executes High Court Writs.[2]

The first (High) Shrivalties were established before the Norman Conquest in 1066 and date back to Saxon times.[3] In 1908, an Order in Council made the Lord-Lieutenant the Sovereign's prime representative in a county and reduced the High Sheriff's precedence.[4] Despite however that the office retains his responsibilities for the preservation of law and order in a county.[2]

While the office of High Sheriff ceased to exist in those Irish counties, which had formed the Irish Free State in 1922, it is still present in the six counties and two county boroughs (Belfast and Derry) of Northern Ireland.

Sheriffs of the City of Londonderry[edit]

  • 1613: William Glynne and Robert Griffith (first Sheriffs of Londonderry)
  • 1613: Edward Doddington[5]
  • 1623: Thomas Keyes and Hugh Thompson[5]
  • 1624: Tobias Smyth and George Handcock[5]
  • 1642–1647: Robert Lawson[5]
  • 1662: Gervais Squire and Richard Graham[5]
  • 1670: William Noble and William Kyle[5]
  • 1671: Edward Edwards and William Miller[5]
  • 1672: William Rogers and Francis Newton[5]
  • 1673: Samuel Hobson and Andrew Coningham[5]
  • 1674: Henry Thompson and John Buchanan[5]
  • 1675: Robert Houston and Henry Long[5]
  • 1676: James Coningham and John Ash[5]
  • 1677: William Squire and Alexander Lecky[5]
  • 1678: Charles Newton and James Morrison[5]
  • 1679: Andrew Coningham and Matthew Bridges[5]
  • 1680: Robert Shannon and John Ewing[5]
  • 1681: Henry Farbasco and James Gordon[5]
  • 1682: James Strong and Henry Cochran[5]
  • 1683: William Hemsworth and James Sympson[5]
  • 1684–1685: Andrew Coningham and Matthew Cocken[5]
  • 1686: John Campsie and William Newton[5]
  • 1687: William Newton and Henry Ash[5]
  • 1688–1689: Edward Brookes and Horace Kennedy[5]
  • 1690: Thomas Moncrieff and Henry Ash[5]
  • 1691: Henry Ash and Samuel Leeson[5]
  • 1692–1693: William Crookshank (died May 1693, replaced by John Crookshank) and John Harvey[5]
  • 1694: William Mackie and Thomas Ash[5]
  • 1695: John Cowan and Hugh Davey[5]
  • 1696: John Harvey and Alexander Coningham[5]
  • 1697: Joseph Morrison and John Dixon[5]
  • 1698: Albert Hall and Robert Gamble[5]
  • 1699–1700: John Denning and Samuel Harvey[5]

18th century[edit]

  • 1701: John Denning and George Tomkins[5]
  • 1702: Archibald Coningham and Joseph Ewing[5]
  • 1703: Thomas Lecky and James Anderson[5]
  • 1704: Alexander Skipton and Joseph Davey[5]
  • 1705: William Edgar and John Ridell[5]
  • 1706: George Ash and John Moore[5]
  • 1707–1708: Robert Norman and Frederick Coningham[5]
  • 1709: Henry McManus and John Duckett (died 1705 and replaced by Matthew Squire)[5]
  • 1710: Robert Houston and Peter Stanley[5]
  • 1711–1712: Giles Gifford and Francis Jennings[5]
  • 1713: Frederick Coningham and Edward Skipton[5]
  • 1714: Alexander Squire and Thomas Moncrieff[5]
  • 1715: Robert Taylor and Frederick Gordon[5]
  • 1716: George Gonne and Robert Graham[5]
  • 1717: John Darcus and Francis Jennings[5]
  • 1718: Phillip Sullivan and Henry Hart[5]
  • 1719: Henry McManus and Edward Carter[5]
  • 1720: Frederick Coningham and Henry White[5]
  • 1721: John Darcus and Andrew McIlwaine[5]
  • 1722: George Ash and Frederick Gordon[5]
  • 1723: William Stewart and William Ash[5]
  • 1724: Richard Coningham and Matthew Leeson[5]
  • 1725: Edward Skipton and George Crookshank[5][6]
  • 1726: Henry Dixon and William Montgomery[5]
  • 1727: Andrew McIlwaine and William Ash[5]
  • 1728: George Hart and John Davis[5]
  • 1729: Robert Houston (died July 1729 and replaced by James Every) and Ullysses Burgh[5]
  • 1730: Edward Houston and Ezekiel Coningham[5]
  • 1731: Charles McManus and Jeremiah Gardner[5]
  • 1732: Richard Coningham and George Ewart[5]
  • 1733: John Darcus and Joseph Hill[5]
  • 1734: Andrew McIlwaine and William Foliott[5]
  • 1735: William Gamble and George Ash[5]
  • 1736: Francis Knox and Alexander Lecky[5]
  • 1737–1739: Francis Knox and Henry Darcus[5]
  • 1740: Andrew McIlwaine and Mossom Gamble[5]
  • 1741: Charles Richardson and William Foliott[5]
  • 1742: Charles Richardson and John Hamilton[5]
  • 1743: John Hamilton and George Gordon[5]
  • 1744: George Gordon and William Boyd[5]
  • 1745–1746: William Hamilton and John Fairly[5]
  • 1747: John Fairly and Thomas Lecky[5]
  • 1748–1749: Thomas Lecky and William Kennedy[5][6]
  • 1750: William Hamilton and Robert Fairly[5]
  • 1751–1753: William Hamilton and Hugh Hill[5]
  • 1754–1755: Samuel Montgomery and J. Mauleverer[5]
  • 1756: William Hamilton and Robert Houston[5]
  • 1757–1758: Frederick Hamilton and James Ramage[5]
  • 1759–1761: James Ramage and Thomas James[5]
  • 1762: Thomas James and William Reynolds[5]
  • 1763: William Reynolds and Adam Schoales[5]
  • 1764–1772: Stephen Bennett and John Nicolls[5]
  • 1773–1774: John Nicolls and James Ramage[5]
  • 1775: John Darcus and Matthew Rutherford[5]
  • 1776: John Coningham and Hol. Lecky[5]
  • 1777: Squire Lecky and James Patterson[5]
  • 1778: Daniel Patterson and Samuel Curry[5]
  • 1779: David Ross and William Swettenham[5]
  • 1780: Eneas Murray and Mossom Boyd[5]
  • 1781: George Lenox and William McLintock[5]
  • 1782: Michael Ross and William Lenox[5]
  • 1783: John Hart and Joseph Curry[5]
  • 1784: Dick Coningham and George C Kennedy[5]
  • 1785: William Walker and Roger Murray[5]
  • 1786: Andrew Ferguson, jnr and R. Harrison[5]
  • 1787: Alexander Lecky and Alexander Fletcher[5]
  • 1788: David Ross and H. Mitchell[5]
  • 1789: Adam Schoales , jnr and George Hart[5]
  • 1790: George Schoales and James Galbraith[5]
  • 1791: William Alexander and George Curry[5]
  • 1792: William Lenox and George Hart[5]
  • 1793: Marcus Hill and Alexander Young[5]
  • 1794: R. Murray and James Murray[5]
  • 1795: R. G. Hill and William Law[5]
  • 1796: J. Murray and William Patterson[5]
  • 1797: J. Murray and John Bond[5]
  • 1798: Thomas Lecky and William H. Ash[5]
  • 1799: Thomas Patterson and John Ferguson[5]

19th century[edit]

  • 1800: Maurice Knox and A. Major[5]
  • 1801: Thomas P. Kennedy and T. Moffett[5]
  • 1802: David Ross and Thomas Murray[5]
  • 1803: Thomas Patterson and William D. Lecky[5]
  • 1804: David Ross and James Gregg[5]
  • 1805: James Moody and J. Moffett[5]
  • 1806: Thomas Young and P. McDonagh[5]
  • 1807: J. Chambers and William Marshall[5]
  • 1808: Henry Barré Beresford and Thomas Woore[5]
  • 1809: Thomas Shepherd and C. Rea[5]
  • 1810: J. Dysart and William Ball[5]
  • 1811: J. Coningham and D. Ross[5]
  • 1812: Thomas Kennedy and James Gregg[5]
  • 1813: James Gregg and John Rea[7]
  • 1814: Conolly Skipton and M. M'Causland[5]
  • 1815: Samuel Curry and Tristram Carcy[8]
  • 1816: J.Murray and Thomas P. Kennedy[5]
  • 1817: James Major and Richard Harvey[7] (also Sheriffs of County Londonderry)
  • 1818: John Thompson and Richard Babington[7] (also Sheriffs of County Londonderry)
  • 1819: Thomas Kennedy and E. Leslie[5] (also Sheriffs of County Londonderry)
  • 1820: D. Knox and W. M'Clintock[5]
  • 1821: Joshua Gillespie and Marcus Gage[5] (also Sheriffs of County Londonderry)
  • 1822: Thomas P. Kennedy and James S. Gage[5]
  • 1823: Dominick Knox and Andrew Bond[5]
  • 1824: Thomas P. Kennedy and Sir William Williams[5]
  • 1825: Marcus M'Causland and Thomas D. Bateson[5]
  • 1826: Adam Schoales and George Hill[5]
  • 1827: Sir James Robertson Bruce, 2nd Baronet and Pitt Skipton[5]
  • 1828: William L. Conyngham and Tristram kennedy[5]
  • 1829: John Hart and George H. Boggs[5]
  • 1830: Conolly Gage and William Gregg[5]
  • 1831: John Murray and Joshua Gillespie[5]
  • 1832: Adam Schoales and Samuel J. Crookshank[5]
  • 1833: Henry Darcus and Anthony Babington[5]
  • 1834: John Murray and Frederick Hamilton[5]
  • 1835: Stewart Crawford Bruce and Anthony Babington[5]
  • 1836: Henry Darcus and Archibald McCorkell[5]
  • 1848: John Stephenson[9](also High Sheriff of County Londonderry)
  • 1849: James Johnson Clark, of Lugantogher Maghera[10] (also High Sheriff of County Londonderry)
  • 1856: Robert Houston
  • 1858: Samuel Maxwell Alexander[11] (also High Sheriff of County Londonderry)
  • 1870: Robert Jackson Alexander of Portglenone[12] (also High Sheriff of County Londonderry)
  • 1888: Conolly William Lecky Browne-Lecky of Derry [13](also High Sheriff of County Londonderry)

High Sheriffs of the City of Londonderry[edit]

  • 1900: Sir John Barre Johnston [14]
  • 1903: Matthew Anderson Ballantine[15]
  • 1904: Sir John McFarland, 1st Baronet[16]
  • 1914–1923: Horace Bayer[17][18]
  • 1924: John Burns[19]
  • 1925: Robert Watson[20]
  • 1926: James Mark[21]
  • 1927: James Colhoun[22]
  • 1928: Joseph H. Welch[23]
  • 1929: Robert H. Smith[24]
  • 1930–1938: Basil McFarland[16]
  • 1939: Frederick Simmons[25]
  • 1940–1941: James Hamilton[26][27]
  • 1942–1945: John J. Buchanan[28][29][30][31]
  • 1946–1949: Arthur Harold Noble[32][33][34][35]
  • 1950–1952: Arthur William Richards[36][37][38]
  • 1952: Colonel Sir Basil Alexander Talbot McFarland, 2nd Baronet of Aberfoyle (also High Sheriff of County Londonderry)
  • 1953–1954: John James Hill[39][40]
  • 1955–1956: Samuel Reginald Cochrane[41][42]
  • 1957–1958: James Curry Hamilton[43][44]
  • 1959–1960: James Anderson Piggot[45][46]
  • 1961: Daniel McLean McDonald[47]
  • 1962–1963: Joseph Alexander Love Johnston[48][49]
  • 1964:
  • 1965–1966: John Talbot McFarland[50][51]
  • 1967–1968: John Alexander Canning[52][53]
  • 1969: Adam R. Laurie[54]
  • 1970: Liam McCormick[55]
  • 1971: Thomas Fitzpatrick Cooke[56]
  • 1972: Ronald Marsden Harvey[57]
  • 1973–1974: D. J. T. Gilliland[58]
  • 1975: Henry Frederick Dougan Stevenson[59]
  • 1976: Francis Gerard Guckian[60]
  • 1977: Desmond Gilbert Cromie Whyte[61]
  • 1978: Brian Glancy[62]
  • 1979: Samuel John Black[63]
  • 1980: John Vance Arthur[64]
  • 1981: James Edward O'Donnell[65]
  • 1982: P. I. O'Doherty[66]
  • 1984: J. Hart[67]
  • 1985: A. O. Kennedy[68]
  • 1986:
  • 1991: E. P. Harvey of Drumahoe[69]
  • 1992: D. A. J. Keegan of Culmore[70]
  • 1993: T. E. W. Huey of Londonderry[71]
  • 1994: G. F. W. Price of Londonderry [72]
  • 1995: Michael G. A. Black of Caw[73]
  • 1996: Derek Curtis of Londonderry [74]
  • 1997: Stuart C. Keys of Molenan[75]
  • 1998: Alan David McClure of Londonderry[76]
  • 1999: Mrs. Mar Hasson of Londonderry [77]

21st century[edit]

  • 2000:
  • 2001:
  • 2002: John Charles McGinnis of Eglinton[78]
  • 2003: John Carson Ian Warnock of Londonderry[79]
  • 2004: Mrs Margaret Claire Lee of Londonderry[80]
  • 2005: Ian Alexander Young of Londonderry[81]
  • 2006: Jack Andrew Clark McFarland of Claudy[82]
  • 2007: Richard John Sterling of Coleraine[83]
  • 2008: Eamon Gee [84]
  • 2009: Ian William Crowe DL of Londonderry
  • 2010: Hugh Christopher Hegarty
  • 2011: Steven Lindsay[85]
  • 2012: Ann Murray Cavanagh
  • 2013: James Kerr
  • 2014: Jonathan Snyder
  • 2014: Robert Dunn of Caw Park [86]
  • 2015: Mrs Vindi Torney
  • 2016: Mrs Patricia O'Kane of Londonderry [87]

References[edit]

  1. ^ John David Griffith Davies and Frederick Robert Worts (1928). England in the Middle Ages: Its Problems and Legacies. A. A. Knopf. p. 119. 
  2. ^ a b Alexander, George Glover (1915). The Administration of Justice in Criminal Matters (in England and Wales). The University Press. p. 89. 
  3. ^ Morris, William Alfred (1968). The Medieval English Sheriff to 1300. Manchester: Manchester University Press. p. 73. ISBN 0-7190-0342-3. 
  4. ^ Millward, Paul (2007). Civic Ceremonial: A Handbook, History and Guide for Mayors, Councillors and Officers. Shaw. p. 163. ISBN 0-7219-0164-6. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs ct cu cv cw cx cy cz da db dc dd de df dg dh di dj dk dl dm dn do dp dq dr ds dt du dv dw dx dy dz ea eb ec ed ee ef eg eh ei ej ek el em Ordnance survey of the county of Londonderry.  Google Books
  6. ^ a b Visitation of Ireland, p.184
  7. ^ a b c Reports from Commissioners Volume 4 (Ireland). 1824. 
  8. ^ Reports from Commissioners
  9. ^ "The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954)". Trove. Retrieved 3 August 2013. 
  10. ^ "Co Cavan Newspaper Extracts". Retrieved 29 July 2011. 
  11. ^ "no. 6775". The Edinburgh Gazette. 29 January 1858. p. 181. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
  12. ^ "no. 8027". The Edinburgh Gazette. 25 January 1879. p. 104. Retrieved 1 October 2013. 
  13. ^ Burke, Bernard (1912). Genealogical and heraldic history of the landed families of Ireland. 
  14. ^ Kelly's Handbook to the Titled , Landed and Official Classes. 1916. 
  15. ^ The Coronation of Edward the Seventh: A Chapter of European and Imperial History By John Edward Courtenay Bodley, 1903
  16. ^ a b Introduction: McFarland Papers", Public Record Office of Northern Ireland
  17. ^ Belfast Gazette, 3 March 1922
  18. ^ Belfast Gazette, 2 February 1923
  19. ^ Belfast Gazette, 1 February 1924
  20. ^ Belfast Gazette, 6 February 1925
  21. ^ Belfast Gazette, 5 February 1926
  22. ^ Belfast Gazette, 4 February 1927
  23. ^ Belfast Gazette, 8 February 1928
  24. ^ Belfast Gazette, 1 February 1929
  25. ^ Belfast Gazette, 9 June 1939
  26. ^ Belfast Gazette, 7 June 1940
  27. ^ Belfast Gazette, 6 June 1941
  28. ^ Belfast Gazette, 12 June 1942
  29. ^ Belfast Gazette, 4 June 1943
  30. ^ Belfast Gazette, 2 June 1944
  31. ^ Belfast Gazette, 1 June 1945
  32. ^ Belfast Gazette, 31 May 1946
  33. ^ Belfast Gazette, 13 June 1947
  34. ^ Belfast Gazette, 11 June 1948
  35. ^ Belfast Gazette, 17 June 1949
  36. ^ Belfast Gazette, 16 June 1950
  37. ^ Belfast Gazette, 15 June 1951
  38. ^ Belfast Gazette, 13 June 1952
  39. ^ Belfast Gazette, 19 June 1953
  40. ^ Belfast Gazette, 11 June 1954
  41. ^ Belfast Gazette, 17 June 1955
  42. ^ Belfast Gazette, 15 June 1956
  43. ^ Belfast Gazette, 14 June 1957
  44. ^ Belfast Gazette, 27 June 1958
  45. ^ Belfast Gazette, 12 June 1959
  46. ^ Belfast Gazette, 17 June 1960
  47. ^ Belfast Gazette, 16 June 1961
  48. ^ Belfast Gazette, 15 June 1962
  49. ^ Belfast Gazette, 14 June 1963
  50. ^ Belfast Gazette, 18 June 1965
  51. ^ Belfast Gazette, 17 June 1966
  52. ^ Belfast Gazette, 16 June 1967
  53. ^ Belfast Gazette, 14 June 1968
  54. ^ Belfast Gazette, 27 June 1969
  55. ^ "The legacy of Liam McCormick", Derry Journal, 18 April 2008
  56. ^ Index to High Sheriffs, Sheriffs and Wardens, thePeerage.com
  57. ^ Belfast Gazette, 30 June 1972
  58. ^ Belfast Gazette, 29 June 1973
  59. ^ Belfast Gazette, 24 January 1975
  60. ^ Belfast Gazette, 9 January 1976
  61. ^ Belfast Gazette, 14 January 1977
  62. ^ Belfast Gazette, 20 January 1978
  63. ^ Belfast Gazette, 26 January 1979
  64. ^ Belfast Gazette, 11 January 1980
  65. ^ Belfast Gazette, 9 January 1981
  66. ^ Belfast Gazette, 8 January 1982
  67. ^ Belfast Gazette, 6 January 1984
  68. ^ Belfast Gazette, 28 December 1984
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  75. ^ "no. 5800". The Belfast Gazette. 14 February 1997. p. 137. Retrieved 25 October 2013. 
  76. ^ "no. 5906". The Belfast Gazette. 20 February 1998. p. 161. Retrieved 25 October 2013. 
  77. ^ "no. 6000". The Belfast Gazette. 15 January 1999. p. 21. Retrieved 25 October 2013. 
  78. ^ "no. 6308". The Belfast Gazette. 28 December 2001. p. 1291. Retrieved 20 June 2009. 
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  82. ^ "Notice: 1110/9 (Issue: 6730)". Belfast Gazette. Archived from the original on 23 October 2013. Retrieved 22 October 2013. 
  83. ^ "no. 6830". The Belfast Gazette. 22 December 2006. p. 6434. Retrieved 20 June 2009. 
  84. ^ "no. 6935". The Belfast Gazette. 21 December 2007. p. 8406. Retrieved 20 June 2009. 
  85. ^ Cite web|url = http://www.agendani.com/high-sheriffs-ceremonial-role/%7Ctitle= High Sheriff’s ceremonial role|publisher= AgendaNI|accessdate = 29 September 2014
  86. ^ http://www.londonderrysentinel.co.uk/news/londonderry-news/robert-dunn-is-sheriff-for-2014-1-5788310
  87. ^ http://lordbelmontinnorthernireland.blogspot.co.uk/2016/01/sheriff-appointments.html