Holy Church of Jesus Christ

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Holy Church of Jesus Christ was a schismatic sect in the Latter Day Saint movement that formed under the leadership of Alexandre Caffiaux, a French member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Strangite Church).

In 1963, Caffiaux travelled from France to Wisconsin to become a member of the Strangite church. In Wisconsin, he was baptized and was ordained to the priesthood.[1] On his return flight to France, Caffiaux reported receiving a revelation from God that he was the rightful successor to Joseph Smith, Jr. and James J. Strang and that he should become the head of the church.[1][2]

In 1964, while visiting Iran, Caffiaux reported being visited by an angel in a vision and being ordained a prophet, seer, and revelator and the embodiment of the First Presidency of the Melchizedek priesthood.[1][2] Other Strangite adherents in France supported Caffiaux in his claims.[1]

Although Caffiaux called for a general church conference to consider his claims, none was called. At a conference of the Strangite church in France, the Strangite adherents voted to rename their congregation "Église sainte de Jésus Christ" — the "Holy Church of Jesus Christ". In 1978, the Strangite church formally rejected Caffiaux's claims.[1]

In 1966, the Holy Church of Jesus Christ had congregations in France and in New Mexico in the United States.[1] The organization is now defunct.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f J. Gordon Melton (1996, 5th ed.). Encyclopedia of American Religions (Detroit, Mich.: Gale) p. 583.
  2. ^ a b Stanley L. Johnston (1966). The Call and Ordination of Alexandre Roger Caffiaux (n.p.).