Indian Car of the Year

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Logo of the Indian Car of the Year

The Indian Car of the Year Award (ICOTY) is presented annually to the best new car launched in India, and is based on similar other awards such as European Car of the Year.[1] The award was established in 2006, with the Maruti Suzuki Swift winning the first award.[2]


Hyundai has won the award four times, while Maruti Suzuki and Honda have won twice.

Most of the award winning cars have been from Japanese or Korean manufacturers, and are available globally in the same or different guises.

The Hyundai Elite i20 and i10 Grand, for instance, are available in Europe and Japan. The European Renault Duster developed by the Renault engineers, sold worldwide and built in India yet got this award for 2013. The Maruti brand on Suzuki models is exclusive to India. The Honda City is largely restricted to Asian and South American markets, while the Ford Figo is a modified version of the Ford Fiesta that was sold in Europe from 2002 to 2008. The Honda Civic is a global model, although not all versions are sold on every market.


  1. ^ "Hyundai Grand i10 awarded Indian Car of the Year for 2014". Economic Times. 19 December 2013. Retrieved 3 March 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "Swiftly making history". Business Standard. 6 May 2006. Retrieved 3 March 2014. 
  3. ^ "Hyundai Creta is the most coveted Indian Car of the Year 2016 (ICOTY) award". Indiatoday. 9 December 2015. Retrieved 9 December 2015. 
  4. ^ "Hyundai Elite i20 is the Indian Car of the Year 2015". Business Standard. 18 December 2014. Retrieved 22 December 2014. 
  5. ^ "Renault Duster wins Indian Car of the year 2013". Top gear. 22 December 2012. Retrieved 19 October 2015. The Duster with its compact dimensions, SUV goodness, solid on-road dynamics and affordable price tag clinched it to the title 
  6. ^ "Ford Figo is Indian Car of the Year 2011". The Hindu. 16 December 2010. Retrieved 3 March 2014. 
  7. ^ "Wheels of the year". The Hindu. 28 December 2009. Retrieved 3 March 2014. 

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