Joint Special Forces Aviation Wing

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Joint Special Forces Aviation Wing
Active 2 April 2001 - present[1]
Country United Kingdom
Branch Royal Air Force
 British Army
Type Joint coordination
Role Special forces aviation
Part of United Kingdom Special Forces (UKSF)[2]
Equipment Boeing Chinook HC4
Westland Lynx
Eurocopter AS365N3 Dauphin II
Westland Gazelle AH1

The Joint Special Forces Aviation Wing (JSFWA) is a joint Royal Air Force and British Army organisation that coordinates the provision of rotary wing aviation support to the United Kingdom Special Forces.[1]

The Wing is under the peacetime command of the Station Commander of RAF Odiham, but the Army or RAF retain full command of their respective personnel.[1]

History[edit]

The Wing was formed on 2 April 2001, bringing together the Lynx and Chinook helicopters of 657 Squadron AAC and 7 Squadron RAF and later in 2008 included the covert fleet of 8 Flight AAC (now No. 658 Squadron AAC).[1] 8 Flight AAC was re-designated as No. 658 Squadron AAC in September 2013.[3][4]

Squadrons[edit]

The composition of the Wing and its rotary aircraft is:[Note 1]

It enjoys a charitable affiliation with the Worshipful Company of Curriers in the City of London.[10][11][12]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Most sources do not state that the Special Forces Flight No. 47 Squadron RAF which operates the Lockheed C-130 Hercules is part of JSFWA, however, one source in 2015 claimed it is part of JSFWA.[5] One source claimed that No. 651 Squadron AAC which operates the Britten-Norman Defender had been part of JSFWA in 2004.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JSFAW - Responsibilities and Composition". Royal Air Force. Archived from the original on 27 February 2014. 
  2. ^ "PLG Directive 73/07 Part 8, Restricted files - Administration Guide" (PDF). Veterans UK. Service Personnel and Veterans Agency (SPVA). December 2007. Archived from the original (PDF) on 14 July 2014. 
  3. ^ Official page of the Army Air Corps of the British Army (2 September 2013). "8 Flight Army Air Corps was remustered as 658 Squadron Army Air Corps". Facebook. Retrieved 11 June 2017. 
  4. ^ a b "News briefs". AirForces monthly - Officially The World's Number One Military Aviation Magazine. No. 310. Bourne, Lincolnshire: Key Publishing Ltd. January 2014. p. 7. ISSN 0955-7091. 
  5. ^ a b Ripley, Tim (November 2015). "Order of Battle; Joint Special Forces Aviation Wing - The Royal Air Force in 2015 (Supplement)". AirForces monthly - Officially The World's Number One Military Aviation Magazine. No. 332. Bourne, Lincolnshire: Key Publishing Ltd. pp. 12, 14. ISSN 0955-7091. 
  6. ^ Warner, Guy (2011). First in the Field: 651 Squadron Army Air Corps. Barnsley, South Yorkshire: Pen & Sword Books Ltd. ISBN 9781848842632. 
  7. ^ "Military Aircraft: Helicopters - Secretary of State for Defence - Column 2351W—continued". www.parliament.uk. 1 October 2007. Retrieved 10 June 2017. 
  8. ^ a b "Military Aircraft: Helicopters - Secretary of State for Defence - Column 2351W". www.parliament.uk. 1 October 2007. Retrieved 10 June 2017. 
  9. ^ "RAF ODIHAM - Who is Based Here". Royal Air Force. Retrieved 10 June 2017. 
  10. ^ "Chinook is shot down". The Sun. London. 20 August 2009. Retrieved 26 March 2010. (Subscription required (help)). 
  11. ^ British Army Aviation in Action, Tim Ripley, Page 181,ISBN 9781848846708
  12. ^ Tim Ripley (10 December 2008). "UK Army Air Corps received Dauphins". Jane's Defence Weekly. 45 (50): 10.