Jonatan Binotto

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Jonatan Binotto
Personal information
Full name Jonatan Binotto
Date of birth (1975-01-22) 22 January 1975 (age 42)
Place of birth Montebelluna, Italy
Height 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in)
Playing position Midfielder
Youth career
1991–1993 Juventus
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1993–1998 Juventus 0 (0)
1994–1995 Ascoli (loan) 28 (4)
1995–1996 Cesena (loan) 32 (4)
1996–1998 Verona (loan) 38 (6)
1998–2001 Bologna 62 (4)
2001–2004 Internazionale 0 (0)
2001–2002 Chievo (loan) 5 (0)
2002 Brescia (loan) 11 (0)
2002–2003 Como (loan) 28 (0)
2004–2005 Bologna 9 (0)
2005 Pistoiese 14 (0)
2006 Triestina 1 (0)
2006–2007 Casalecchio
National team
1994–1996 Italy Italy U-21 8 (2)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Jonatan Binotto (born 22 January 1975) is an Italian former footballer who played as a midfielder.

Club career[edit]

Early career[edit]

Binotto started his professional career in 1993 at Juventus F.C.. He spent two seasons on loan at Serie B clubs, before joining Hellas Verona F.C., who were in Serie A at that time. He struggled to break into the first team, however, and remained with the team until the club's relegation in the summer of 1997.

Bologna[edit]

He then joined Bologna F.C. 1909 in the summer of 1998 in a co-ownership deal, for 150 million lire,[1] where he played 62 Serie A games in three seasons. In May 2000 Bologna bought Binotto outright for 10 billion lire, but in pure player swap, and Bologna bought back most of the players for free, made the deal purely financial tricks.[nb 1]

Internazionale[edit]

He was signed by Internazionale in June 2001, in a co-ownership deal,[4] in exchange for Fabio Macellari, who went to Bologna. Both Binotto and Macellari were "valued" at 12 billion lire (€6,197,483).[5]

He was immediately loaned out to Chievo, Brescia and Como.

Late career[edit]

Binotto returned to Bologna in January 2004, after the co-ownership deal was terminated ca. January 2003, but not until the summer of 2004 was he included in the team again. He then played for Pistoiese and Triestina in the 2005–06 season, and Casalecchio of Eccellenza in the 2006–07 season.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ 9,850 million lire excess the original fee in 1998, or €5.087 million; 1 euro = 1936.27 lire.[2][3] It made Juventus had a financial income of €5.087 million but counter-weight by the signing of Alessandro Gamberini (50% for €2.324 million or 4.5 billion lire), Giacomo Cipriani (50% for €2.324 million) and Alex Pederzoli (50% for about €516,000 or 1 billion lire) in co-ownership deal (10 billion lire in total), all would create amortisation cost in instalments. Moreover, only Pederzoli actually joined Juventus.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Relazioni e Bilancio al 30 Giugno 2000". Juventus FC (in Italian). Borsa Italiana archive. ca.19 December 2000. Retrieved 24 March 2015. page 42, IMMOBILIZZAZIONI FINANZIARIE Compartecipazioni ex art. 102 bis N.O.I.F.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  2. ^ "PARAMATTI E'DELLA JUVE". Juventus FC (in Italian). 24 May 2000. Archived from the original on 22 June 2000. Retrieved 1 July 2010. 
  3. ^ "Financial Statements as at 30 June 2001" (PDF). Juventus FC. 4 September 2001. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 April 2015. Retrieved 8 May 2012. 
  4. ^ "COMPROPRIETA' E SCAMBI: OLTRE A ZANETTI SPUNTA LA SORPRESA BINOTTO" (in Italian). FC Internazionale Milano. 28 June 2001. Retrieved 8 May 2012. 
  5. ^ FC Internazionale Milano SpA Report and Accounts on 30 June 2002 (Italian), CCIAA

External links[edit]