Kola Tubosun

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Kola Tubosun
Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún in Lagos (2020).png
Tubosun (2020)
Born
Kọ́láwọlé Olúgbémiró Ọlátúbọ̀sún Ọládàpọ̀

22 September 1981 (1981-09-22) (age 40)
Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria
Other namesKola Olatubosun
Alma mater
Occupation
Known forYorùbá Name Project, Nigerian English Google Assistant, Writing
Notable work
"Edwardsville by Heart", a collection of poetry
Spouse(s)Temie Giwa
Websitekolatubosun.com

Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún is a Nigerian linguist, writer, translator, scholar, and cultural activist.[1][2][3] His work and influence span the fields of education, language technology, literature, journalism, and linguistics. He is the recipient of the 2016 Premio Ostana "Special Prize" for Writings in the Mother Tongue. (Ostana Premio Scritture in Lingua Madre) for his work in language advocacy.[4][5][6] He writes in Yoruba and English.

Biography[edit]

Tubosun was born in Ibadan, Nigeria in September 1981. He holds a Masters in Linguistics from Southern Illinois University Edwardsville (2012) and a BA from the University of Ibadan (2005).[7] He also studied briefly at Moi University, Eldoret, Kenya, in April 2005, as part of a MacArthur Foundation-sponsored Socio-Cultural Exchange Program.[8]

At the University of Ibadan, he was a campus journalist and rose to the position of president of the Union of Campus Journalists, which he led from 2002 to 2004.

In 2009, he was a Fulbright scholar, and he taught Yoruba at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville until 2010.[9][10] His debut collection of poetry/travelogue Edwardsville by Heart covers this period.[11] In 2010, while still in the US, he worked as a volunteer adult literacy tutor, with resettled immigrants, at the International Institute of St. Louis, Missouri.[7] In 2012, he completed a master's degree in Linguistics/TESL and returned to Lagos, Nigeria to take up a job as a high school teacher of English language.[12]

For a few years between 2015 and 2019, he worked as a linguist at Google Nigeria first as a Speech Linguistics Project Manager from 2015 to 2016, and later as a Project Manager for Natural language processing tasks in African languages in 2019.[13]

His work of advocacy has focused on the role of African languages in today's world, especially in technology, education, literature, governance, and entertainment. He founded the Yorùbá Names Project in 2015, a lexicography project, to show how technology can help in revitalizing local languages. As a writer, he has produced work in travel writing, travel poetry, essays on literature, scholarly writings, journalism, and fiction.

From September 2019 to September 2020, he was a Chevening Fellow at the British Library in London as a Research Fellow on the Library's African language printed collection from the 19th Century.[14]

In September 2020, he was appointed Programme Director of Yoruba Academy in Ibadan.[15][16][17]

Linguistics, lexicography, and language advocacy[edit]

Tubosun is known for his work in linguistics, technology, and language advocacy.[18] He has written extensively on the need to empower Nigerian languages, and Nigerian English, to function effectively in education, technology, governance, and literature. He has also engaged in projects in furtherance of these objectives.[19]

In 2012, he led a successful campaign to have Twitter include Yoruba in the list of languages into which the platform was being translated.[20][21][22][23][24]

In March 2015, he founded the "Yorùbá Names Project" at YorubaName.com[25][26] as an effort to document all names in Yoruba in an accessible multimedia format. The project also released a free Yorùbá Keyboard software for Mac and Windows to allow its users type in Yorùbá language and Igbo on the internet.[27][28][29]

Tubosun's team at Google Nigeria was behind the Nigerian English voice/accent on Google platforms.[30][31][32] The voice was launched in July 2019.[33] His collaboration at Google was helpful in getting Nigerian language diacritics into GBoard, and also correcting the mistranslation of the Esu, the Yoruba trickster god, on Google Translate.[34][35][36][37] He has also worked with Google Arts & Culture on some of its exhibits in Nigeria and Kenya.

He has also worked as a consultant for Oxford English Dictionary since 2018 on Nigerian English and Yoruba entries. Some new words from Nigerian English were added to the OED in December 2019.[38]

In 2017, he collaborated with OrishaImage to create Yorùbá Melody, a multilingual 90 minutes free Yorùbá language "audio phrasebook for Olórìṣà and cultural tourists."[39] The audio phrasebook was released in English, Spanish, and Portuguese. In August 2019, a fourth language was added: German.[40]

He also worked with BBC Academy to help localize the Journalistic Style Guide of the BBC into Igbo, Yoruba, and Nigerian Pidgin, ahead of its maiden broadcast in those Nigerian languages.

In honour of UNESCO's declaration of 2019 as the International Year of Indigenous Languages, Tubosun, through The YorubaName Project in collaboration with Rising Voices created @DigiAfricanLang, a twitter rotation curation account featuring scholars and professionals working in African language documentation and revitalization across the continent.[41]

Creative and travel writing[edit]

Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún at a recent book panel. Photo courtesy Ake Arts and Book Festival 2016

Tubosun has contributed to Nigerian creative writing since 2005, through poetry, travel writing, essay, prose, travel writing and literary criticism. His work has appeared in the International Literary Quarterly, Sentinel Poetry, Brittle Paper, Ake Review, Popula, NTLitMag, and Enkare Review'.

He worked as the pioneering editor of a literary magazine of new writing from Nigerian and Africa called NTLitMag, from 2012 to 2015. In November 2015, he co-edited as well as Aké Review, the literary publication of the Aké Arts and Book Festival, with Kolade Arogundade. From 2015 to 2016, while he taught as a school teacher, he edited two issues of The Sail, an anthology of creative works of high school students.[42][43][44][45][46][47]

Tubosun has been on the advisory board of the Aké Arts and Book Festival since July 2019.[48]

In September 2018, he accompanied Brandon Stanton from Humans of New York as a guide while the latter was in Nigeria,[49][50] an experience he later wrote about.[51]

In 2016, he wrote the entry on Nnedi Okorafor's science fiction novel Lagoon for "Imaginary Wonderlands" (October, 2016), a collection of essays about invented worlds in literature from around the globe, from Dante to Rushdie. The book was edited by Laura Miller.[52]

After writing an illuminating travel profile on Nobel laureate Wole Soyinka in 2018,[53] Tubosun was awarded the 2019 Morland Writing Scholarship to write a biography of the writer, Africa's first Nobel Laureate in Literature.[54][55][56]

Journalism[edit]

While a student at the University of Ibadan, he was an active campus journalist. In 2002, he became the president of the Union of Campus Journalists. During his tenure, he reformed the organisation, brought the press board online, instituted formal training for campus journalists, and connected the campus organisations with many media houses in the country, who in turn opened internship roles for student journalists during their holidays. One of the recipients of the first internships was Fisayo Soyombo, then a student of agriculture, who later became a decorated journalist in Nigeria.

In 2010, he contributed to 234Next as a travel writer.[57]

In 2015, he was nominated for the CNN African Journalists Awards for a travel piece he first published on KTravula.com, becoming the first blogger nominated for the Prize.[58][59]

In 2016, after the illegal demolition of Ilojo Bar, a national monument located on Lagos Island, Tubosun wrote a three-part series in The Guardian investigating the cause and consequences of the demolition on the history of Lagos and Nigeria.[60][61][62]

In September 2019, Tubosun co-founded The Brick House Journalism Collective, with eight other publications [63][64] with the aim of presenting independent viewpoints from all around the world. He became the founding editor-in-chief of OlongoAfrica, a literary-journalistic platform for new creative writing from Africa.[65]

Poetry[edit]

Tubosun writes poetry in Yoruba and English. His chapbook Attempted Speech & Other Fatherhood Poems was first published by Saraba Magazine in 2015. An earlier one Headfirst into the Meddle was published in 2005.

In 2018, his first full collection of poetry Edwardsville by Heart was published. It is a book described as "a magical meeting place of travelogue, memoir, and poetry,"[66] covering a period of three years when the author lived in the midwestern United States. It is "a quiet, reflective book",[67] "by far a rather enjoyable read."[68] Petero Kalulé calls him "a poet who writes so freely, so playfully, so beguilingly about the everyday and its “effing possibilities.”[69] JM Schreiber says it has "an uncluttered vision—emotionally contained and all the more powerful as a consequence."[67] The book was selected as one of "Africa's Must Read Books of 2018"[70]

His second collection of poetry, Ìgbà Èwe was published in June 2021.[71][72] It has been described as "an affirmation of two or more cultures in a progressive conversation."[73]

Literary translations[edit]

Tubosun has translated literature into Yoruba, his mother tongue. He has also argued for more literary translations into African languages as a way of revitalizing the languages.[74] His translation of a short story by Kenyan writer Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o into Yoruba was published in the Jalada Language Translation project[75] in March 2016. In 2019, his translation of a short story by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie was published in the Absinthe Journal.[76]

Since 2005, he has translated, into English, some of the poetry of his father, Yoruba language poet, Olatubosun Oladapo. Since 2019, he has participated in workshops on the same project with the Poetry Translation Centre in London.[77] One of these poems was published in Love is Not Dead by Christopher McCabe.[78][79]

His second collection of poetry, Ìgbà Èwe, is a bilingual collection with original Yorùbá translations of poetry by American philosopher and poet Emily Grosholz[71][72] and illustrated by Yemisi Aribisala.

Awards[edit]

The Premio Ostana, a glass-art sculpture and a medal, created by Silvio Vigliaturo, a famous contemporary Italian artist and glass sculptor.

Premio Ostana[edit]

In January 2016, Tubosun was chosen as a recipient of a Premio Ostana "Special Prize" for Mother Tongue Literature (Il Premio Ostana Internazionale Scritture in Lingua Madre 2016), a prize given to any individual who has done writing and notable advocacy for the defence of an indigenous language.[4][5][80][81][82] The prize ceremony was held from 2 to 5 June 2016, in the town of Ostana (Cuneo, Italy).[6][83][84] Tubosun was the first African to be so honoured by the organisation.

In October 2015, he was nominated for the CNN African Journalists Award[85] for his travel piece Abeokuta's Living History, first published at KTravula.com. He was the first ever blogger on the award shortlist.

Other awards/grants/fellowships[edit]

  • 2022 Imminent Innovations Grant in Language Technology[86]
  • 2019 Chevening Research Fellowship to The British Library
  • 2018 Miles Morland Writing Scholarship[87]
  • 2017 Ventures Africa "40 Under 40" Innovators for 2017.
  • 2017 Saraba Magazine Manuscript Contest
  • 2016 100 most innovative people in technology by YNaija[88]
  • 2016 Quartz African Innovator's List.[89]
  • 2015 Nigeria's most innovative people in technology by YNaija[90]

Selected works[edit]

Poetry

  • Ìgbà Èwe (ISBN 9789789907014) Ouida Books, Lagos. 2021.
  • Edwardsville by Heart (ISBN 9780993550232) Wisdom's Bottom Press, UK, 2018
  • Attempted Speech and Other Fatherhood Poems (Poetry Chapbook) Saraba Magazine, 2015.[91]

Edited

  • Edo North: Field Studies of the Languages and Lands of the Northern Edo (Ed., 2011). Essays in Honour of Professor Ben O. Elugbe. Zenith Book House.[92]
  • NTLitMag: 29 Issues (2012-2015)[93]

Personal life[edit]

His father Olatubosun Oladapo, was a poet and journalist. His sister, Yemi Adesanya, is an accountant and poet. His wife, Temie Giwa founded LifeBank, a health logistics company. He lives in Lagos, Nigeria.[94]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Olofinlua, Temitayo (25 May 2015). "Nigerian Scholar Creates an Online Home for Yoruba Names". Global Press Journal. Global Press. Archived from the original on 4 September 2015. With the help of volunteers and crowdsourcing contributors, he is creating an online compendium of Yoruba names with meanings and aural pronunciations.
  2. ^ ""A Stroll with Kola Tubosun, Teacher, Writer, Linguist and Founder, YorubaName.com"". Archived from the original on 16 April 2016. Retrieved 13 April 2016.
  3. ^ "Writing a New Nigeria: Ideas of Identity" Archived 5 December 2015 at the Wayback Machine, BBC Radio 4,
  4. ^ a b Florence Utor (31 January 2016). "Tobosun Receives International Award For Mother Tongue Literature 2016". The Guardian. Nigeria. Archived from the original on 25 March 2016.
  5. ^ a b Uhakheme, Ozolua (25 January 2016). "Nigerian author wins Premio Ostana award for scriptures". The Nation. Archived from the original on 14 March 2016. Retrieved 27 March 2016.
  6. ^ a b "Giunge a conclusione l'ottava edizione del Premio Ostana". Archived from the original on 6 June 2016. Retrieved 6 June 2016.
  7. ^ a b "Kola Tubosun's biography, net worth, fact, career, awards and life story - ZGR.net". www.zgr.net. Retrieved 27 May 2022.
  8. ^ "Yorùbá Academy appoints Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún programme director". 10 February 2021. Retrieved 5 March 2022.
  9. ^ "SIUE Alumnus Named to International Innovator's List". www.siue.edu. Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  10. ^ "Alumnus Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún's Work on Preserving African Languages". www.siue.edu. Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  11. ^ "#WeLoveBooks | Edwardsville by Heart by Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún". Brittle Paper. 29 October 2018. Archived from the original on 18 November 2018. Retrieved 9 July 2019.
  12. ^ "Alumnus Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún's Work on Preserving African Languages". www.siue.edu. Retrieved 27 May 2022.
  13. ^ TechCabal (4 February 2019). "Kola Tubosun (@kolatubosun) is returning to Google as project manager for Natural Language Processing Tasks, and we're hoping this would help improve the local experience with Google products.pic.twitter.com/lhPj1CLSwz". @TechCabal. Archived from the original on 10 November 2019. Retrieved 21 October 2019.
  14. ^ "African Literature through the Language Lens: The Yorùbá Example - Asian and African studies blog". blogs.bl.uk. Archived from the original on 1 February 2020. Retrieved 30 December 2019.
  15. ^ "Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún Appointed Programme Director of Yorùbá Academy". Open Country Mag. 11 February 2021. Retrieved 12 February 2021.
  16. ^ "Yoruba academy appoints new programme director". The Guardian Nigeria News - Nigeria and World News. 12 February 2021. Retrieved 12 February 2021.
  17. ^ "Yorùbá Academy appoints Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún programme director". 10 February 2021. Retrieved 12 February 2021.
  18. ^ "In Africa, Rescuing the Languages that Western Tech Ignores". VOA. Retrieved 28 December 2021.
  19. ^ "On Lionheart's Oscar ban: Is Nigerian English a Foreign Language?". African Arguments. 6 November 2019. Archived from the original on 26 January 2020. Retrieved 28 January 2020.
  20. ^ Egbunike, Nwachukwu (2013). "Nigerians Shake Up Twitter with Yoruba-Language Tweets". Global Voices. Archived from the original on 24 April 2016. Retrieved 16 April 2016.
  21. ^ Oluwafemi, Bankole (2 March 2012). "Twitter Promises Support For Yoruba in Coming Months". TechLoy. Archived from the original on 5 April 2016. Retrieved 16 April 2016.
  22. ^ "Twitter Can Now be Translated into Yoruba". Encomium. 4 December 2014. Archived from the original on 14 September 2015.
  23. ^ Bankole, Oluwafemi (14 November 2014). "It Took Only Two Years, But Twitter Is Finally Getting Translated into Yoruba". TechCabal. Archived from the original on 6 October 2015. As we speak, Kola and others are working to translate the Twitter's standard glossary of terms.
  24. ^ Elusoji, Solomon (21 April 2015). "Cultural Export". This Day Live. Archived from the original on 2 April 2016. Retrieved 30 March 2016 – via AllAfrica. An online Yoruba dictionary has been launched to help the Yoruba race in Nigeria go beyond borders.
  25. ^ "Online Dictionary Helps Nigerians Decode Their Names" Archived 4 March 2016 at the Wayback Machine, Voice of America.
  26. ^ "YorubaName.com Hits Crowdfunding Benchmark" Archived 13 April 2016 at the Wayback Machine, TechCabal.
  27. ^ "Yoruba keyboard layouts for Windows and Mac". Radar from TechCabal. Archived from the original on 27 April 2016. Retrieved 20 October 2017.
  28. ^ "Yorubaname Team Launch Yoruba and Igbo keyboards - Gadget Reviews Nigeria". 20 July 2016. Archived from the original on 25 July 2016. Retrieved 7 August 2016.
  29. ^ "Combined Igbo, Yoruba keyboard made available on Yorubaname.com". 18 July 2016. Archived from the original on 9 August 2016. Retrieved 7 August 2016.
  30. ^ Kazeem, Yomi. "How Google created a Nigerian voice and accent for Maps". Quartz Africa. Archived from the original on 31 July 2019. Retrieved 31 July 2019.
  31. ^ Okike, Samuel (26 July 2019). "How Kola Tubosun and his team gave Google a Nigerian accent". Techpoint.Africa. Archived from the original on 28 July 2019. Retrieved 27 July 2019.
  32. ^ "Google's new Nigerian accent". Public Radio International. Archived from the original on 2 August 2019. Retrieved 2 August 2019.
  33. ^ "Google goes Nigerian with local accent, 'informal' transit routes". Reuters. 24 July 2019. Archived from the original on 31 July 2019. Retrieved 31 July 2019.
  34. ^ "New advocates for the ancient gods of Nigeria". The Mail & Guardian. 8 June 2018. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  35. ^ ""Èṣù" isn't "the Devil"; But You Knew That Already". Yoruba Name. 16 December 2016. Archived from the original on 5 March 2020. Retrieved 16 March 2017.
  36. ^ "Esu Is Not Satan 2016 Awareness". Ọmọ Oòduà. Archived from the original on 24 March 2017. Retrieved 23 March 2017.
  37. ^ "Esu is not Satan". Orisha Image. Archived from the original on 24 March 2017. Retrieved 23 March 2017.
  38. ^ "Release notes: Nigerian English". Oxford English Dictionary. 13 January 2020. Archived from the original on 27 January 2020. Retrieved 28 January 2020.
  39. ^ "Yorùbá Melody Audio Course". Orisha Image. Archived from the original on 11 January 2018. Retrieved 31 August 2019.
  40. ^ Túbọ̀sún, Kọ́lá (28 August 2019). "In December 2017, we launched this 90-min Yorùbá language learning audiobook in three languages (Spanish, Portuguese, and English). We've now added a fourth language: German:https://soundcloud.com/yorubamelody/yoruba-melody-audio-course-deutsch …". @kolatubosun. Retrieved 31 August 2019.
  41. ^ "Twitter @DigiAfricanLang 2019". Rising Voices. Archived from the original on 3 August 2019. Retrieved 22 August 2019.
  42. ^ "Review of The Sail | An Anthology of Writings by Students in a Lagos Secondary School" Archived 20 April 2016 at the Wayback Machine, Brittle Paper, 24 August 2015.
  43. ^ "First Breath From Whitesands: A review by Tade Ipadeola" Archived 14 April 2016 at the Wayback Machine, Sabi News, 3 July 2015.
  44. ^ "The Sail: Whitesands Schools Launch 2nd Edition of Students' Creativity Compendium". Archived from the original on 27 May 2016. Retrieved 24 May 2016.
  45. ^ "Whitesands students bring magic in the second edition of 'The Sail'". Sabi News. 25 May 2016. Archived from the original on 12 June 2016. Retrieved 25 May 2016.
  46. ^ "Our students literary works yielding results". National Mirror. Archived from the original on 4 June 2016. Retrieved 6 June 2016.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  47. ^ "Whitesands School Celebrates the Next Generation of African Writers". Brittle Paper. 1 June 2016. Archived from the original on 24 June 2016. Retrieved 6 June 2016.
  48. ^ AkeArts&BookFestival (27 July 2019). "We are delighted to welcome Kola Tubosun @kolatubosun Dami Ajayi @ajayidami and Wana Udobang @MissWanaWana onto the Ake Arts & Book Festival Advisory Board. Thank you for all the incredible things that you do for the Arts on the African continent. We see you". @akefestival. Retrieved 30 January 2020.
  49. ^ "Gala Seller Who Gave out his goods to prisoners meets Humans of New York Founder, Shares his experience as a prisoner". KanyiDaily. 27 September 2018. Retrieved 7 October 2018.
  50. ^ "'Humans Of New York' Is In Lagos, Documenting The Stories Of Fascinating People". Konbini - All Pop Everything! (in French). Archived from the original on 4 November 2019. Retrieved 4 November 2019.
  51. ^ "Humans of New York visits Lagos". Popula. Archived from the original on 18 April 2019. Retrieved 4 November 2019.
  52. ^ "Nnedi Okorafor: I just have stories to tell..." AfricanWriter.com. 30 May 2016. Retrieved 27 May 2022.
  53. ^ "A House for Mr. Soyinka". Popula. Archived from the original on 12 September 2018. Retrieved 4 November 2019.
  54. ^ Reporter, Our (5 December 2018). "Tubosun gets 18,000pounds for winning Morland scholarship". The Nation Nigeria. Archived from the original on 6 December 2018. Retrieved 6 December 2018.
  55. ^ "The 4 Winners of the 2018 Miles Morland Scholarships". Brittle Paper. 28 November 2018. Archived from the original on 6 December 2018. Retrieved 6 December 2018.
  56. ^ Udodiong, Inemesit (27 November 2018). "Meet the 2018 winners of the Morland Writing Scholarship". www.pulse.ng. Archived from the original on 6 December 2018. Retrieved 6 December 2018.
  57. ^ "Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún – @WeAreXpats". Retrieved 27 May 2022.
  58. ^ "Nigerians dominate CNN/MultiChoice African journalism awards". TheCable. 10 October 2015. Retrieved 3 August 2021.
  59. ^ "PREMIUM TIMES journalist, four other Nigerians nominated for 2015 CNN African Journalist of the Year Awards | Premium Times Nigeria". 15 September 2015. Retrieved 3 August 2021.
  60. ^ "A tragedy of confusing interests". The Guardian Nigeria News - Nigeria and World News. 2 October 2016. Retrieved 3 August 2021.
  61. ^ "A closer look into Lucumi and Yoruba in comparison". News from Havana. 18 March 2018. Retrieved 3 August 2021.
  62. ^ "A failure all around". The Guardian Nigeria News - Nigeria and World News. 9 October 2016. Retrieved 3 August 2021.
  63. ^ "Introducing the Brick House: The wolf-proof media cooperative". Columbia Journalism Review. Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  64. ^ "Introducing Brick House, a Co-Op Against the Wolves That Killed Your Favorite Websites". Sludge. Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  65. ^ Murua, James (21 December 2020). "The Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún-published Olongo Africa is now here". James Murua's African Literature Blog. Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  66. ^ "#WeLoveBooks | Edwardsville by Heart by Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún". Brittle Paper. 29 October 2018. Archived from the original on 18 November 2018. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  67. ^ a b roughghosts, Author (24 May 2019). "Chanelling memories through verse: Edwardsville by Heart by Kólá Túbòsún". roughghosts. Archived from the original on 1 June 2019. Retrieved 3 August 2019. {{cite web}}: |first= has generic name (help)
  68. ^ Mo (3 December 2018). "Edwardsville by Heart by Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún". Literary Everything. Archived from the original on 4 August 2019. Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  69. ^ Africa, Arts And (20 February 2019). "Edwardsville by heart by Kólá Túbòsún: A book Review". Medium. Retrieved 4 August 2019.
  70. ^ "Africa's must-read books of 2018". African Arguments. 13 December 2018. Archived from the original on 3 August 2019. Retrieved 4 August 2019.
  71. ^ a b "Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún Announces Second Poetry Collection, Ìgbà Èwe". Open Country Mag. 15 June 2021. Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  72. ^ a b "Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún Translates American Poetry to Yoruba in New Book Ìgbà Èwe". Brittle Paper. 15 June 2021. Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  73. ^ "Affirming Poetry Across Cultures | Ayọ̀délé Ìbíyẹmí". Isele Magazine. 21 August 2021. Retrieved 21 August 2021.
  74. ^ Túbọ̀sún, Kọ́lá (2019). "The Shivering". Absinthe. 26 (1).
  75. ^ Jalada (22 March 2016). "Jalada Translation Issue 01: Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o". Jalada Africa. Archived from the original on 27 April 2017. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  76. ^ "Absinthe: A Journal of World Literature in Translation". quod.lib.umich.edu. Archived from the original on 19 June 2019. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  77. ^ "Yoruba poetry workshop: Translating Túbọ̀sún Ọládàpọ̀ with Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún". www.poetrytranslation.org. Archived from the original on 30 January 2020. Retrieved 30 January 2020.
  78. ^ "No, Love is Not Dead – Chris McCabe explains why | Southbank Centre". www.southbankcentre.co.uk. Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  79. ^ "JMP to publish collection of love poetry from around the world | The Bookseller". www.thebookseller.com. Retrieved 15 June 2021.
  80. ^ "KỌ́LÁ TÚBỌ̀SÚN becomes first African to win Premio Ostana international language award". Sabi News. 26 January 2016. Archived from the original on 2 April 2016. Retrieved 30 March 2016.
  81. ^ NG, Mirror (26 January 2016). "Nigerian Man becomes first African to win the Premio Ostana International Award for Mother Tongue Literature". Archived from the original on 15 March 2016. Retrieved 30 March 2016.
  82. ^ Okuyeme, Tony (29 January 2016). "Tubosun wins Premio Ostana International Award". New Telegraph. Archived from the original on 2 April 2016. Retrieved 30 March 2016.
  83. ^ "Dalla lingua Yoruba allo shar-chicham, nel borgo occitano di Ostana un festival per salvare le lingue minori". L'Huffington Post. 24 May 2016. Archived from the original on 31 May 2016. Retrieved 6 June 2016.
  84. ^ "Scritture in lingua madre Un patrimonio da salvare". LaStampa.it. 3 June 2016. Archived from the original on 25 June 2016. Retrieved 6 June 2016.
  85. ^ Adaokoye, Ukamaka (14 September 2015). "Kola Tubosun and four other Nigerians among finalists in the 2015 CNN Multichoice African Journalist". Olisa.TV. Archived from the original on 17 March 2017. Retrieved 16 March 2017.
  86. ^ "Research Grants Ceremony. Innovations in language technology". Imminent - The Translated's Research Center. 6 April 2022. Retrieved 7 April 2022.
  87. ^ "Tubosun gets 18,000pounds for winning Morland scholarship". The Nation Newspaper. 4 December 2018. Retrieved 7 April 2022.
  88. ^ Oyetimein, Oluwapelumi (2016). "YNaija presents the class of 2016: Nigeria's 100 most innovative persons in Technology". YNaija. Archived from the original on 27 February 2016. Retrieved 26 February 2016.
  89. ^ "Quartz Africa Innovators 2016 list". Archived from the original on 8 July 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  90. ^ Stephen, Jewel (2015). "The class of 2015: Nigeria's 100 most innovative persons in Technology". YNaija. Archived from the original on 19 March 2015. Retrieved 16 March 2015.
  91. ^ "Attempted Speech and Other Fatherhood Poems". Saraba Magazine. 30 September 2015. Archived from the original on 3 October 2015. Retrieved 30 September 2015.
  92. ^ Edo North: Field Studies of the Languages and Lands of the Northern Edo: Essays in Honour of Professor Ben O. Elugbe. SOAS. Zenith Book House. 2011. ISBN 9789784885584. Archived from the original on 13 November 2018. Retrieved 10 April 2016.
  93. ^ Túbọ̀sún, Kọ́lá (7 January 2020). "29 LitMag Issues Online". Medium. Archived from the original on 21 January 2020. Retrieved 8 January 2020.
  94. ^ "Nigerian Poet and Linguist Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún Celebrates His 40th in Style". brittlepaper.com. Retrieved 27 May 2022.

External links[edit]