Lincoln Highway Bridge (Dugway Proving Ground, Utah)

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Lincoln Highway Bridge
Government Creek Bridge (Lincoln Highway Bridge).jpg
Lincoln Highway Bridge
Lincoln Highway Bridge (Dugway Proving Ground, Utah) is located in Utah
Lincoln Highway Bridge (Dugway Proving Ground, Utah)
Location In Dog Area on 2nd St. over Government Creek, Dugway Proving Ground, Utah
Coordinates 40°10′58″N 112°55′23″W / 40.18278°N 112.92306°W / 40.18278; -112.92306Coordinates: 40°10′58″N 112°55′23″W / 40.18278°N 112.92306°W / 40.18278; -112.92306
Area less than one acre
Built 1900 (1900)
NRHP Reference # 75001825[1]
Added to NRHP May 21, 1975

Lincoln Highway Bridge, also known as Government Creek Bridge, is located in southern Tooele County, Utah, on the United States Army’s Dugway Proving Ground facility. It once served an original proposed alignment of the Lincoln Highway, an historic transcontinental auto route. The bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Early history[edit]

According to one source, sometime around the turn of the twentieth century, a road was constructed across what is now Dugway Proving Ground.[2] In 1915, the Lincoln Highway Association (LHA) identified a road for incorporation into the highway’s designated route between Salt Lake City, Utah and Ely, Nevada. Constructed by laborers from Utah State Prison, the bridge has been identified as being a component of an early proposed alignment of that route. Despite the LHA’s considerable lobbying, by 1922, Utah officials had abandoned the route in favor of a more northerly alignment via Wendover, Utah along the Wendover Cut-off. It is claimed to be "the only significant structure in this area that remains of the original proposed national highway."[2][3]

Construction details[edit]

When the bridge was surveyed for consideration for the National Register of Historic Places, it was described as being constructed of "hewn logs and log supports." The survey notes abutments originally constructed of stone which were later reinforced by concrete as part of a Civilian Conservation Corps retrofit in the 1930s. The bridge measures 14.5 by 11.5 feet (4.4 m × 3.5 m) and was noted to be "in fairly good condition" upon completion of the survey in 1974.[2]

National Register of Historic Places[edit]

The structure was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Staff (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ a b c d Evans, Arthur J. (October 1, 1974). "Government Creek Bridge" (PDF). National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. Retrieved September 8, 2012. 
  3. ^ Schindler, Hal (December 5, 1993). "The Long And Winding Road, The Lincoln Highway: Utah Played A Key Role In Taming West For Cars". The Salt Lake Tribune. p. D1. Retrieved November 13, 2012.