List of Ministers of Internal Affairs of Uganda

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List of Ministers of Internal Affairs of Uganda[edit]

Since independence from the United Kingdom on 9 October 1962, Uganda has had the following ministers of internal affairs:

List of Ministers of Internal Affairs of Uganda since 1962
No. Name From To Head of State Notes
- G Oda
1960
1962
Benedicto Kiwanuka Oda was minister under Prime Minister Benedicto Kiwanuka and the first to take the title of minister and not secretary.[1] He was Minister of Internal Affairs under the transitional government.
1 Cuthbert Joseph Obwangor
1962
1964
Apollo Milton Obote Obwangor was Minister of Regional Administration which briefly assumed the responsibilities of the Ministry of Internal Affairs.[2]
1 Felix Kenyi Onama Onama also can lay claim to the Minister of Interior position between 1962 and 1964, as he was Minister of Works and Labour. That role assumed some of the other responsibilities of the Minister of Interior like leading the police.[3]
2 Basil Kiiza Bataringaya
1964
1971
Basil Kiiza Bataringaya headed the newly created Ministry of Home Affairs, later renamed Ministry of Internal Affairs. He assumed the role after he flipped parties and joined the Obote administration.[4]
3 Lt. Col. Ernest Obitre Gama
1971
1973
Idi Amin [5]
4 Charles Oboth‐Ofumbi
1973
16 February 1977
[6]
5 Paulo Muwanga
1978
1980
Yusuf Lule
Godfrey Binaisa [7]
Presidential Commission of Uganda [8]
Paulo Muwanga Paulo Muwanga became head of state briefly when the Presidential Commission of Uganda gave him the powers of the President of Uganda from 22 May to 15 December 1980, where he also was Minister of Internal Affairs. [9]
6 John Mikloth Magoola Luwuliza-Kirunda
1981
1985
Apolo Milton Obote (Second Administration) Dr. John M. M. Luwuliza Kirunda left the role when he became Foreign Minister [10][11]
7 Paul Ssemogerere
1985
1988
General Bazilio Olara-Okello Paul Ssemogerere left the position when he became Foreign minister[12][13]
General Tito Okello
Yoweri Museveni
Paul Ssemogerere stayed on for the beginning of Yoweri Museveni's administration.[14]
8 Kahinda Otafiire
1988
1989
Maj. Kahinda Otafiire had to resign as Minister of Internal Affairs after he brandished a pistol at a woman at a Kampala bar.[15]
9 Ibrahim Mukiibi
1989
1994
[16]
10 Crispus Kiyonga
1994
1996
11 Eriya Kategaya
1996
2001
12 James Wapakhabulo
2001
2004
Died in office
13 Tom Butime
2004
2005
In acting capacity
14 Hilary Onek
27 May 2011
23 May 2013
[17]
15 Aronda Nyakairima
23 May 2013
12 September 2015
[18]
16 Rose Akol
13 November 2015
6 June 2016
[19]
17 Jeje Odongo
6 June 2016
Present

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lubega, Henry (26 March 2018). "Kiwanuka, his 13-member Cabinet swear in after one year wait". Daily Monitor. Retrieved 2019-02-24.
  2. ^ Daily Monitor (3 August 2012). "Uganda's first cabinet ministers in 1962". Daily Monitor. Archived from the original on 8 April 2019. Retrieved 8 April 2019.
  3. ^ Taylor, Sidney (1967). The New Africans: A Guide to the Contemporary History of Emergent Africa and Its Leaders. Putnam.
  4. ^ Seftel, Adam (1994). Uganda: the rise and fall of Idi Amin: from the pages of Drum. Bailey's African Photo Archives Production. ISBN 9780958384667. Archived from the original on 11 January 2019.
  5. ^ "'I was forced to be minister'". Daily Monitor. 10 October 2015.
  6. ^ "Uganda Minister of Health Defects; Tells of Killings Ordered by Amin". The New York Times. 5 June 1977. Retrieved 24 February 2019.
  7. ^ Jørgensen, Jan Jelmert (1981). "Uganda: a modern history". Taylor & Francis. pp. 335–339. ISBN 978-0-85664-643-0.
  8. ^ Jørgensen, Jan Jelmert (1981). "Uganda: a modern history". Taylor & Francis. pp. 335–339. ISBN 978-0-85664-643-0.
  9. ^ Jørgensen, Jan Jelmert (1981). "Uganda: a modern history". Taylor & Francis. pp. 335–339. ISBN 978-0-85664-643-0.
  10. ^ "Cedar Rapids Gazette Archives, Sep 13, 1981, p. 4". newspaperarchive.com. Retrieved 2019-04-08.
  11. ^ Europa (1926). The Europa Year Book 1982 A World Survey Vol.-ii.
  12. ^ Kitaka, Edward. "Military puts former opposition leader in charge of police". AP NEWS. Retrieved 2019-04-08.
  13. ^ Pirouet, Louise (1995). Historical Dictionary of Uganda. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 9780810829206.
  14. ^ Lubega, Henry (26 January 2014). "Where is NRM's first Cabinet?". Daily Monitor. Retrieved 8 April 2019.
  15. ^ Perlez, Jane; Times, Special to The New York (1989-06-15). "Uganda After Its Years of Terror: A New Political Stability Emerges". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-04-08.
  16. ^ Refugees, United Nations High Commissioner for. "Refworld | Uganda: Whether there is compulsory military service and whether there was a general call-up to report for military training in or about August 1989". Refworld. Retrieved 2019-04-08.
  17. ^ Bagala, Andrew (2013-06-15). "Ugandan minister: We'll make friends with whomever we please | NK News - North Korea News". North Korea News. Retrieved 2019-02-19.
  18. ^ Musoke, Ronald (24 May 2013). "Gen. Aronda Nyakairima new Internal Affairs Minister as Museveni reshuffles Cabinet". The Independent (Uganda). Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 12 September 2015.
  19. ^ Vision Reporter (16 November 2015). "Akol appointed internal affairs minister". www.newvision.co.ug. Archived from the original on 2019-04-07. Retrieved 2019-02-19.

External links[edit]