Lovely Warren

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Lovely Warren
Mayor lovely warren 2013.jpg
69th Mayor of Rochester
Assumed office
January 1, 2014
Preceded byThomas Richards
Rochester City Council President
In office
January 2010 – November 2013
Member of the Rochester City Council from the Northeast District
In office
2007–2013
Personal details
Born (1977-07-01) July 1, 1977 (age 42)
Rochester, New York, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Timothy Granison
ChildrenTaylor
ResidenceNortheast District of Rochester (Northland-Lyceum)
Alma materJohn Jay College of Criminal Justice (BA)
Albany Law School (J.D.)
ProfessionLawyer
WebsiteOfficial website

Lovely Ann Warren (born July 1, 1977) is an American politician, and lawyer who is the 69th and current Mayor of Rochester, New York. She was previously the President of the Rochester City Council.[1] She is the first woman to serve as mayor of Rochester, as well as the second African-American after Bill Johnson.

Career[edit]

Warren graduated from Wilson Magnet High School. She graduated from John Jay College of Criminal Justice with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Government and from Albany Law School of Union University with a Juris Doctor degree. Warren served as a legislative assistant and chief of staff to New York Assemblyman David Gantt. She clerked for Rochester City Court Judge Teresa Johnson. She served as summer law clerk to New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer. In 2004, Warren was admitted to the bar.[2]

In 2007 Warren was elected to the Rochester's City Council. In 2010 she was elected as the fifth President of the Rochester City Council, the youngest in Rochester's history.[citation needed]

In 2011, she was a participant in the We Live NY Summit at Cornell University. She has appeared on panels sponsored by Rochester Downtown Development Corporation and the Rochester Chapter of the League of Women Voters. She also hosts a youth event at City Hall for students of the Rochester City School District. She has been a guest speaker at events for young people in the Rochester City School District and colleges including, the University of Rochester, Albany Law School of Union University, Towson University and Howard University.[citation needed]

Warren was sworn in as Rochester's 69th mayor on January 1, 2014. She began her second term on January 1, 2018 after winning re-election in 2017.

In 2016 Warren put a red, white and blue sign next to Susan B. Anthony’s grave the day after Hillary Clinton obtained the nomination at the Democratic National Convention; the sign stated, "Dear Susan B., we thought you might like to know that for the first time in history, a woman is running for president representing a major party. 144 years ago, your illegal vote got you arrested. It took another 48 years for women to finally gain the right to vote. Thank you for paving the way."[3] The city of Rochester put pictures of the message on Twitter and requested that residents go to Anthony's grave to sign it.[3]

2013 Mayoral election[edit]

She won the 2013 Democratic primary over incumbent mayor Thomas Richards 57 percent to 42 percent.[4]

While Richards endorsed Warren and ended his active campaign, he remained a candidate on the Independence and Working Families lines. The Independence Party created the grassroots Turn Out for Tom campaign in an effort to get Richards re-elected mayor. Warren defeated Richards in the general election 55 to 39 percent.

Actions as mayor[edit]

Warren in the 2014 Labor Day Parade

Since taking office, Mayor Warren has focused on three primary goals: "job creation, fostering safer and more vibrant neighborhoods and improving educational opportunities for Rochester’s residents."[5]

Creating More Jobs[edit]

Mayor Warren wants to help city residents overcome barriers to employment and entrepreneurship. To help achieve this goal, she has launched several strategic initiatives, including the introduction of a Kiva crowd funding loan program;[6] a Vanpool;[7] support for Rideshare;[8] and a market-driven community co-operative called OWN Rochester.[9]

Creating Safer/More Vibrant Neighborhoods[edit]

Under Mayor Warren's direction, the Rochester Police Department (RPD) underwent a significant reorganization to implement a neighborhood-based patrol model that converted the patrol structure from two Patrol Divisions (each covering half of the city) to five smaller Patrol Sections.[10] The RPD also implemented a successful Body Worn Camera program during Mayor Warren's first term.[11] Also in Mayor Warren's first term, The Rochester Fire Department t achieved a class 1 ranking from the national Insurance Services Office Inc., which can lead to lower insurance rates for homes and businesses.[12]

Creating Better Educational Opportunities[edit]

While the Mayor's Office has no oversight of the Rochester City School District, Mayor Warren is trying to help all city children succeed in school. She convened an early learning council to help expand Pre-K programs in the city.[13] She also developed a 3 to 3 Initiative to help children to set 3-year-old children on a path to read at grade level by third grade.[14] To help achieve these goals, she eliminated fines for children's books and materials at city libraries.[15] She's has also overseen the distribution of thousands of free children books through such programs at Story Time with Style[16] and Books and Bears.[17]

Other Actions[edit]

In December 2016, Warren announced plans to get rid of the city's red light cameras. The insurance industry objected, citing its own studies which showed that cities that had used red light cameras between 2010 and 2014 had had a 21% drop in the number of fatal red light running crashes, while cities that had stopped using the cameras had had a 30% increase in such deaths. In response to these studies, Warren justified her decision to remove the cameras by saying, "I reached the conclusion the benefits simply don't justify a further extension... I'm very concerned that too many of these tickets have been issued to those who simply can't afford them, which is counter-productive to our efforts to reverse our city's troubling rates of poverty."[18]

Personal life[edit]

Her grandfather, Cecil McClary, was seriously wounded while working as a security guard for Wegmans Food Market in 1984. This incident gave Warren the motivation she needed to pursue a career as an attorney to, in her opinion, right wrongs and make Rochester a safer, better city. McClary died at age 87 on January 2, 2014, a day after Warren was sworn in as mayor at his bedside.[19] Her parents worked for Eastman Kodak Company and Xerox.[20]

Warren's Facebook account was compromised and suspended on December 22, 2014 when pictures of a chat log were shared over the internet and social media.[21]

Warren is married to Timothy Granison and they have a daughter, Taylor.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "City of Rochester | News Release - Lovely A. Warren Sworn-In as Rochester Mayor". Cityofrochester.gov. 2014-01-01. Retrieved 2014-01-10.
  2. ^ "An Inside Look at Rochester's Next Mayor, Lovely Warren". Minorityreporter.net. 2014-01-01. Retrieved 2014-01-10.
  3. ^ a b Salinger, Tobias (2016). "Susan B. Anthony's grave decorated with 'thank you' sign". NY Daily News. Retrieved 2016-07-30.
  4. ^ Louis, Tim. "Major upset: Lovely Warren wins mayor's race | News". Rochester City Newspaper. Retrieved 2014-01-10.
  5. ^ "City of Rochester | Office of the Mayor". www.cityofrochester.gov. Retrieved 2018-12-13.
  6. ^ "City of Rochester | Kiva Rochester Crowdfunded Loans". www.cityofrochester.gov. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  7. ^ "City of Rochester | Commuter Vanpool Program". www.cityofrochester.gov. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  8. ^ "City of Rochester | News Release - Mayor Warren Welcomes Governor Cuomo for Budget Presentation". www.cityofrochester.gov. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  9. ^ "Leadership". OWN ROCHESTER. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  10. ^ "City of Rochester | News Release - RPD Reorganization is Successful, Will Provide Solid Foundation for Enhanced Community Engagement". www.cityofrochester.gov. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  11. ^ "City of Rochester | Body Worn Camera Project - Rochester Police Department". www.cityofrochester.gov. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  12. ^ "City of Rochester | News Release - ISO Ranks Rochester as Class 1 City for Fire Protection". www.cityofrochester.gov. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  13. ^ "City of Rochester | Early Learning Council 2014". www.cityofrochester.gov. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  14. ^ "City of Rochester | Mayor Warren's 3-to-3 Initiative". www.cityofrochester.gov. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  15. ^ "City permanently lifts library fines on children's materials". Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  16. ^ "City of Rochester | Story Time With Style". www.cityofrochester.gov. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  17. ^ "City of Rochester | Books and Bears". www.cityofrochester.gov. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  18. ^ Mayor cancels red light camera program, Democrat & Chronicle, December 1, 2016
  19. ^ Brian Sharp, ROC 6:21 p.m. EST January 2, 2014 (2014-01-02). "Lovely Warren's grandfather dies as administration begins". Democratandchronicle.com. Retrieved 2014-01-10.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  20. ^ "Lovely Warren's hard-scrabble life resonates with Rochester voters - World & Nation". The Buffalo News. 2013-09-14. Retrieved 2014-01-10.
  21. ^ "Warren: Social media 'compromised'". Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. 22 December 2014. Retrieved 6 May 2016.

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Tom Richards
Mayor of Rochester, NY
January 1, 2014 - present
Succeeded by
Incumbent