Mathcounts

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Mathcounts
Mathcounts-logo-2013.png
Mathcounts logo
Formation1983; 39 years ago (1983)
TypeFoundation
PurposeTo provide engaging math programs to US middle school students of all ability levels to build confidence and improve attitudes about math and problem solving.[1]
HeadquartersAlexandria, Virginia
Location
Executive Director
Kristen Chandler[2]
Co-founder
Donald G. Weinert[2]
Main organ
National Staff
Websitemathcounts.org

Mathcounts, stylized as MATHCOUNTS, is a nationwide middle school mathematics competition held in various places in the United States. Its current lead sponsors are Raytheon Technologies and the U.S. Department of Defense STEM.[3]

Topics covered include geometry, counting, probability, number theory, and algebra.

History[edit]

Mathcounts was started in 1983 by the National Society of Professional Engineers, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and CNA Insurance to increase middle school interest in mathematics.[3] The first national-level competition was held in 1984.[1] The competition spread quickly in middle schools, and today it is the best-known middle school mathematics competition.[4] In 2007 Mathcounts launched the National Math Club Program and in 2011 Mathcounts launched the Math Video Challenge Program.[1]

2020 was the first year since 1984 where a national competition was not held, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The "MATHCOUNTS Week" event featuring problems from the 2020 State Competition was held on the Art of Problem Solving website as a replacement.[5]

Structure[edit]

The Mathcounts competition program is open to 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students in 56 U.S. states and territories. The standard competition contains four rounds: Sprint, Target, Team, and Countdown.[6] Some competitions might provide extra, unofficial rounds.

All competitors take the sprint and target rounds. Only students on official teams take the team round officially, though individuals can take the team round with other individuals unofficially. Generally, only the top scoring individuals, determined by sprint and target round performance, participate in the countdown round.

Sprint round[edit]

The sprint round is a written exam consisting of 30 problems with a time limit of 40 minutes. Contestants work individually. Calculators are not allowed. The problems generally increase in difficulty as the question number increases. Each question is worth one point each.[6]

Target round[edit]

The target round is a written exam consisting of 8 problems presented in four pairs of two. Students have 6 minutes to work on each pair of problems. Contestants work individually. Calculators are allowed. These problems are generally more difficult than those in the sprint round. The problems generally increase in difficulty as the round progresses. Each question is worth two points each.[6]

Team round[edit]

The team round is a written exam consisting of 10 problems with a time limit of 20 minutes. Up to four teammates take the examination as a group. Contestants are allowed to discuss the problems with their teammates. Calculators are allowed. These problems are generally more difficult than those on the individual rounds. Each question is worth two points each.[6]

Countdown round[edit]

The countdown round is a fast-paced head-to-head competition. Two students are each given a question to solve in 45 seconds, and may "buzz in" to say the answer to the problem at any time. The first student to answer a problem correctly earns one point. If a student answers a problem incorrectly, the other student has the rest of the time to answer it. The student that earns the most points in a round wins the matchup. Calculators are not allowed.[6]

Scoring and ranking[edit]

Individual score[edit]

A contestant's individual score is equal to the sum of the scores on the sprint and target rounds. A perfect score is 46. Ties are broken by using the tiebreaker system, which may involve a tiebreaker round if the contestants have answered exactly the same questions correctly and incorrectly.[6]

Team score[edit]

A team's score is equal to the sum of the team member's individual scores divided by 4 plus the team round score. A perfect score is 66 (46 from individual rounds and 20 from the team round). Ties are broken by using the tiebreaker system.

Competition levels[edit]

The competition is divided into four levels: school, chapter, state, and national. Students progress to each level in the competition based on performance at the previous level. As the levels progress, the problems get harder.[6]

All students are either school-based competitors ("SBC's") or non-school competitors ("NSC's"). All students whose school is participating in the competition series are SBC's and start at the school level. Students whose school is not participating in the competition series are NSC's and start at the chapter level, competing individually.[6]

School level[edit]

Coaches of each school select up to 12 students from their school to advance to the chapter competition, with 4 of them competing on the official school team. The rest compete individually.[6]

Chapter level[edit]

All qualifying students compete individually. Students on an official school team also compete as a team. The countdown round is optional and can either be used to determine top individuals or as an unofficial round. The top teams and individuals advance to the state competition.[6] The exact number of qualifiers varies by region.[7]

State level[edit]

All qualifying students compete individually. Students on a qualifying school team also compete as a team. The countdown round is optional and can either be used to determine top individuals or as an unofficial round. The top 4 individuals qualify for the national competition. The coach of the winning school team is the coach for the state team.[6] Some states have universities within the state that give scholarships to the top individuals of the state.[8]

National level[edit]

Six people in red shirts and beige pants standing in a line next to men in black suits all in front of a man wearing a grey suit and a red tie
President Barack Obama meets award recipients of the 2010 Mathcounts National Competition in the Oval Office Monday, June 28, 2010.

Qualifying students and coaches receive an all-expense paid trip to the national competition. The competition typically lasts 3–4 days on Mother's Day weekend. The coach of the state team is the supervisor for the team. The students compete individually for the title of national champion. They also compete as a team to represent their state.[6]

The 12 highest scoring individuals advance to the countdown round. The winner of this round is declared the national champion.[9]

Scholarships and prizes are awarded to the top individuals and top state teams.[9] These winners can sometimes win a trip to Space Camp or to the White House to meet the current President of the United States.[9][10]

Other programs[edit]

In addition to the competition program, students can also participate in the Math Video Challenge program and the National Math Club program. These programs are open to the same students as the competition program.

Math Video Challenge program[edit]

The Math Video Challenge program allows students in teams of 4 to create a video that explains the solution to a problem from the Mathcounts School Handbook in a real-world scenario. Judges review and score each video based on mathematical content, communication, creativity and real-world scenario. From the submitted videos, they select 50-100 Quarterfinalist videos. From these, they then select 12 Semifinalist videos and 6 Judges' Choice Winners. Then they select 4 Finalist videos. Finalist teams receive an all-expense paid trip to the national competition where they present their video at the Math Video Challenge Finals. The 224 students that qualified for the national competition then vote to determine the winning video. The 4 winning students receive trophies and scholarships.[11]

National Math Club program[edit]

The National Math Club program allows schools to register a math club for free. Upon registering, club leaders earn free online access to dozens of games, explorations, and problem sets. Clubs that meet at least 5 times during the year achieve silver level status, and clubs that create a creative and collaborative project can achieve gold level status. Clubs that achieve silver and gold level status can earn prizes and recognition. Each year, clubs that achieve gold level status are put into a Grand Prize drawing. The club leader and 4 students from the Grand Prize winning club receive an all-expense paid trip to attend the national competition as honored guests.[12]

Alumni[edit]

Each year, Mathcounts awards two types of scholarships to alumni who participated in at least one of the Mathcounts programs during middle school: the Mathcounts Alumni Scholarship to alumni whose experience in Mathcounts was extremely influential and the Community Coaching Scholarship to alumni who start Mathcounts competition series programs at underrepresented schools. Multiple people can win the same scholarship in the same year.[13]

Competition winners[edit]

Below is a table documenting each year's winning individual, winning state team and coach, and the location of the national competition.

Year Individual winner State-team winner Winning-state coach Location Refs
1984 Michael Edwards, Texas Virginia (1) Joan Armistead Washington, D.C. [14][15]
1985 Timothy Kokesh, Oklahoma Florida Burt Kaufman Washington, D.C.
1986 Brian David Ewald, Florida California (1) Washington, D.C. [15]
1987 Russell Mann, Tennessee New York (1) Robert C. Bieringer Washington, D.C. [15][16]
1988 Andrew Schultz, Illinois New York (2) Washington, D.C. [15][17]
1989 Albert Kurz, Pennsylvania North Carolina Barbara Sydnor Washington, D.C. [15][18]
1990 Brian Jenkins, Arkansas Ohio Washington, D.C. [15][19]
1991 Jonathan L. Weinstein, Massachusetts Alabama Cindy Breckenridge Washington, D.C. [15][20]
1992 Andrei C. Gnepp, Ohio California (2) Washington, D.C. [15][21]
1993 Carleton Bosley, Kansas Kansas Washington, D.C. [22]
1994 William O. Engel, Illinois Pennsylvania (1) Matt Zipin Washington, D.C. [23]
1995 Richard Reifsnyder, Kentucky Indiana (1) Washington, D.C. [24]
1996 Alexander Schwartz, Pennsylvania Pennsylvania (2) Washington, D.C. [25]
1997 Zhihao Liu, Wisconsin Massachusetts (1) Heidi Johnson Washington, D.C. [26]
1998 Ricky Liu, Massachusetts Wisconsin Washington, D.C. [27][28]
1999 Po-Ru Loh, Wisconsin Massachusetts (2) Evagrio Mosca Washington, D.C. [29]
2000 Ruozhou Jia, Illinois California (3) Washington, D.C. [30]
2001 Ryan Ko, New Jersey Virginia (2) Barbara Burnett Washington, D.C. [31]
2002 Albert Ni, Illinois California (4) Thomas Yin Chicago, Illinois [32]
2003 Adam Hesterberg, Washington California (5) Pallavi Shah Chicago, Illinois [33]
2004 Gregory Gauthier, Illinois Illinois Steve Ondes Washington, D.C. [34][35]
2005 Neal Wu, Louisiana Texas (1) Jeff Boyd Detroit, Michigan [36][37]
2006 Daesun Yim, New Jersey Virginia (3) Barbara Burnett Arlington, Virginia [38]
2007 Kevin Chen, Texas Texas (2) Jeff Boyd Fort Worth, Texas [39][40]
2008 Darryl Wu, Washington Texas (3) Jeff Boyd Denver, Colorado [41]
2009 Bobby Shen, Texas Texas (4) Jeff Boyd Orlando, Florida [42]
2010 Mark Sellke, Indiana California (6) Donna Phair[43] Orlando, Florida [44]
2011 Scott Wu, Louisiana California (7) Vandana Kadam[45] Washington, D.C. [46]
2012 Chad Qian, Indiana Massachusetts (3) Josh Frost Orlando, Florida [47]
2013 Alec Sun, Massachusetts Massachusetts (4) Josh Frost Washington, D.C. [48]
2014 Swapnil Garg, California California (8) David Vaughn Orlando, Florida [49]
2015 Kevin Liu, Indiana Indiana (2) Trent Tormoehlen Boston, Massachusetts [50]
2016 Edward Wan, Washington Texas (5) Isil Nal Washington, D.C. [51]
2017 Luke Robitaille, Texas Texas (6) Isil Nal Orlando, Florida [52]
2018 Luke Robitaille, Texas Texas (7) Isil Nal Washington, D.C. [53]
2019 Daniel Mai, Massachusetts Massachusetts (5) Josh Frost Orlando, Florida [9]
2021 Marvin Mao, New Jersey New Jersey (1) Stephanie Cucinella Online [54][55]
2022 Allan Yuan, Alabama New Jersey (2) Marybeth Gakos Washington, D.C. [56]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "MATHCOUNTS: Our Story".
  2. ^ a b "Our Board of Directors | MATHCOUNTS". www.mathcounts.org. Retrieved April 14, 2022.
  3. ^ a b "Our Sponsors | MATHCOUNTS". www.mathcounts.org. Retrieved April 22, 2022.
  4. ^ "Yale MATHCOUNTS".
  5. ^ "MATHCOUNTS Week powered by AoPS". artofproblemsolving.com. Retrieved 2020-05-12.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Mathcounts Competition Official Rules & Procedures". Mathcounts. Retrieved 2022-04-12.
  7. ^ "Peninsula MATHCOUNTS Chapter - Rules for Advancement to the State Competition". Retrieved April 22, 2022.
  8. ^ "Middle School Students Solve Indiana MATHCOUNTS Problems, Earn Summer Program Scholarships". March 15, 2022. Retrieved April 14, 2022.
  9. ^ a b c d "Daniel Mai is the 2019 Raytheon MATHCOUNTS National Champion" (PDF). Retrieved April 13, 2022.
  10. ^ "President George W. Bush meets award recipients of the 2005 Mathcounts National Competition". whitehouse.gov. Retrieved February 8, 2008 – via National Archives.
  11. ^ "Mathcounts Math Video Challenge". Mathcounts. Retrieved April 14, 2022.
  12. ^ "Mathcounts National Math Club". Mathcounts. Retrieved April 14, 2022.
  13. ^ "MathCounts Scholarships For Alumni". Mathcounts. Retrieved April 14, 2022.
  14. ^ "Mike Edwards, 13, an eighth grader from the Kinkaid..." UPI. May 19, 1984. Retrieved April 13, 2022.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h "Mathcounts Winners" (PDF). Virginia Society of Professional Engineers. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 16, 2008. Retrieved February 10, 2008.
  16. ^ "Tennessee 13-Year-Old Wins National Math Contest". AP News. May 15, 1987. Retrieved April 13, 2022.
  17. ^ "Boy, 13, Captures Top Math Honors". LA Times. May 15, 1988. Retrieved April 13, 2022.
  18. ^ "Pennsylvania youth wins math contest". UPI. May 12, 1989. Retrieved April 13, 2022.
  19. ^ "Arkansas eighth grader wins math contest". UPI. May 18, 1990. Retrieved April 13, 2022.
  20. ^ "Massachusetts Youth Wins Math Bee". AP News. May 3, 1991. Retrieved April 13, 2022.
  21. ^ Gene Spafford. Brainy Teen 'Mathcounts' Champ. Yucks Digest. Vol. 2 No. 32. June 13, 1992.
  22. ^ "Kansas Students Top National Mathematics Competition". AP News. April 30, 1993. Retrieved April 13, 2022.
  23. ^ "Illinois Boy Wins National Math Competition". AP News. May 13, 1994. Retrieved April 13, 2022.
  24. ^ "Louisville Boy Wins National Math Competition". AP News. April 28, 1995. Retrieved April 13, 2022.
  25. ^ "Mathematically Correct". Mathematically Correct. Archived from the original on May 11, 2008. Retrieved February 7, 2008.
  26. ^ "Mathletes Compete In Washington On May 9". NASA.gov. Retrieved February 7, 2008.
  27. ^ "Mathletes Compete In Washington On May 15". NASA.gov. Retrieved February 7, 2008.
  28. ^ "Email, Subject "Math"". NASA. Archived from the original on January 9, 2005. Retrieved February 7, 2008.
  29. ^ "1999 Diamond Team". William Diamond Middle School. Retrieved February 7, 2008.
  30. ^ "Kentucky Results: 2000 National Mathcounts Competition, May 12, 2000 – Omni Shoreham Hotel – Washington D.C." Kentucky Engineering Center. Archived from the original on May 15, 2008. Retrieved February 7, 2008.
  31. ^ "2001 Mathcounts Competition Gives Them A Challenge". Virginia Society of Professional Engineers. Archived from the original on January 6, 2009. Retrieved February 7, 2008.
  32. ^ "New Jersey Mathcounts". New Jersey Mathcounts. Archived from the original on September 6, 2012. Retrieved February 7, 2008.
  33. ^ "Mathcounts 2003 National Results". Kentucky Engineering Center. Archived from the original on 15 May 2008. Retrieved February 7, 2008.
  34. ^ "Mathcounts 2004 National Results". Kentucky Engineering Center. Archived from the original on January 7, 2009. Retrieved February 11, 2008.
  35. ^ "2004 National Mathcounts Champion". Kentucky Engineering Center. Archived from the original on August 13, 2007. Retrieved February 7, 2008.
  36. ^ "Louisiana Mathcounts". Louisiana Engineering Society Baton Rouge Chapter. Retrieved February 7, 2008.
  37. ^ "Sugar Land Kids Won 2005 Mathcounts National Champions". Beestar Educations. Retrieved February 7, 2008.
  38. ^ "2006 National Mathcounts Competition". American Society Of Mechanical Engineers. Archived from the original on August 13, 2007. Retrieved February 7, 2008.
  39. ^ "Kevin Chen, Mathcounts National Champion, Wins Best Junior Achiever Relly Award from Live with Regis and Kelly". Business Wire. Archived from the original on December 2, 2008. Retrieved February 7, 2008.
  40. ^ "Texas Eighth Grader and Texas Team Awarded Mathematics Champions at Lockheed Martin Mathcounts National Competition – 2007". PR Newswire. Retrieved February 7, 2008.
  41. ^ "Mathcounts 2007–2008 important dates". Mathcounts. Archived from the original on March 15, 2008. Retrieved February 7, 2008.
  42. ^ "2009 Raytheon Mathcounts National Competition Results". Retrieved June 25, 2011.
  43. ^ https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxzYW50YWNsYXJhdmFsbGV5bWF0aGNvdW50c3xneDo0NmUwMjFmYzkyZmU4ZGJl
  44. ^ "2010 Raytheon Mathcounts National Competition". Retrieved June 25, 2011.
  45. ^ "2011NorCalTopTeams.pdf".
  46. ^ "2011 Raytheon Mathcounts National Competition". Retrieved June 25, 2011.
  47. ^ "Meet the Mathcounts Champion Chad Qian". May 12, 2012. Retrieved April 14, 2022.
  48. ^ "Massachusetts 8th-grader, Alec Sun, crowned National Champion at 2013 Raytheon MATHCOUNTS® National Competition". PR Newswire. May 10, 2013. Retrieved April 14, 2022.
  49. ^ "Swapnil Garg Crowned National Champion at 2014 Raytheon MATHCOUNTS National Competition" (PDF). Retrieved April 14, 2022.
  50. ^ "Kevin Liu Wins National Champion Title at 2015 Raytheon MATHCOUNTS National Competition" (PDF). Retrieved April 13, 2022.
  51. ^ "Edward Wan Crowned National Champion at 2016 Raytheon MATHCOUNTS National Competition" (PDF). Retrieved April 13, 2022.
  52. ^ "Luke Robitaille Named National Champion at 2017 Raytheon MATHCOUNTS National Competition" (PDF). Retrieved April 13, 2022.
  53. ^ "Luke Robitaille Becomes First Repeat National Champion at 2018 Raytheon MATHCOUNTS National Competition" (PDF). Retrieved April 13, 2022.
  54. ^ "2021 Raytheon Technologies MATHCOUNTS National Competition". Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  55. ^ "Bergen county native Marvin Mao named 2021 Raytheon Technologies MATHCOUNTS® national champion". Raytheon. May 11, 2021. Retrieved April 14, 2022.
  56. ^ "2022 Raytheon Technologies MATHCOUNTS National Competition Highlights". Retrieved May 15, 2022.

External links[edit]