Maxine Trottier

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Maxine Trottier (born May 3, 1950) is an American-born Canadian educator and writer. She currently lives in Newfoundland.[1]

She was born in Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan and moved with her family to Windsor, Ontario when she was 10.[2] She became a Canadian citizen in 1970.[2] She graduated from the University of Western Ontario with a degree in education. Trottier taught elementary school for 31 years.[1]

She writes books for young people. Her book Claire's Gift received the Mr. Christie's Book Award [fr]. The Tiny Kite of Eddie Wing won the Canadian Library Association Book of the Year for Children Award.[3]

She is known for writing about the history of Canada. She draws on her own mixed racial heritage as a descendent of Métis ancestors. Many of her books feature bilingual English/Mi'kmaq texts.[2]

Selected works[3][edit]

  • Laura: A Childhood Tale of Laura Secord
  • Circle of Silver Chronicles
  • Alone in an Untamed Land
  • Blood Upon Our Land
  • Storm the Fortress: The Siege of Quebec, William Jenkins, New France, 1759
  • Terry Fox: A Story of Hope 2005

Awards[2][edit]

  • Canadian Children's Book Centre (CCBC) Our Choice Awards selection, 1993–94, for Alison's House
  • CCBC Our Choice Awards selection, 1995-96 for The Voyage of Wood Duck
  • FWTAO Writers' Award, 1996, for The Voyage of Wood Duck
  • FWTAO Writers' Award, 1995 for The Tiny Kite of Eddie Wing
  • Canadian Library Association Book of the Year for Children, 1996, for The Tiny Kite of Eddie Wing
  • Chicago Women in Publishing first-place designation, 1997, for A Safe Place
  • Marianna Dempster Memorial Award, 1998 for Heartsong
  • CCBC Centre Our Choice Awards selection, 1997–98, for Heartsong
  • Mr. Christie's Award, 2000, for Claire's Gift
  • Society of School Librarians International Honor Book Award for Language Arts, 2005, for Sister to the Wolf

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Maxine Trottier". Strong Nations Publishing.
  2. ^ a b c d "Contemporary Authors Online". Biography in Context. Gale. 2007. Retrieved January 15, 2016.
  3. ^ a b "Maxine Trottier". Scholastic Canada.