Minase Shrine

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Minase Shrine
水無瀬神宮
Minase jingu.jpg
Front view
Religion
AffiliationShinto
DeityEmperor Go-Toba, Emperor Tsuchimikado and Emperor Juntoku
TypeImperial Shrine
Location
Minase Shrine is located in Japan
Minase Shrine
Shown within Japan
Geographic coordinates34°53′06″N 135°40′23″E / 34.8849°N 135.673°E / 34.8849; 135.673Coordinates: 34°53′06″N 135°40′23″E / 34.8849°N 135.673°E / 34.8849; 135.673
Architecture
Date established1240
Shinto torii icon vermillion.svg Glossary of Shinto

Minase Shrine (水無瀬神宮, Minase jingū) is a Shinto Shrine in Shimamoto, Osaka[1]

The Shrine is dedicated to the veneration of the kami of Emperor Go-Toba, Emperor Tsuchimikado and Emperor Juntoku.[1] In the struggle with the Kamakura shogunate, the three historical figures are united by one common factor—each was overpowered and banished from the Imperial center in Kyoto: Go-Toba was banished to Oki Island, where he died.[2] Tsuchimikado felt compelled to abandon Kyoto, traveling first to Tosa province (now known as Kōchi Prefecture); and later, he removed himself to Awa province, where he died in exile.[3] Juntoku was forced to end his days at Sado Island.[4] In 1873, the kami of Go-Daigo and Tushimikado were enshrined, and the kami of Juntoku was enshrined in 1874.[5]

Kanpei-sha[edit]

In 1871, the Kanpei-sha (官幣社) identified the hierarchy of government-supported shrines most closely associated with the Imperial family.[6] The kampeisha were shrines venerated by the imperial family. This category encompasses those sanctuaries enshrining emperors, imperial family members, or meritorious retainers of the Imperial family.[7] Up through 1940, the mid-range of Imperial shrines or Kanpei-chūsha (官幣中社) included the shrine; and it was then known as Minase-gū[8] In 1940, Minase's status was changed Kanpei-taisha (官幣大社), which is the highest rank; and since then, it has been known as Minase jingū.[9]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Ponsonby-Fane, Richard. (1959). The Imperial House of Japan, p. 126.
  2. ^ Brownlee, John S. (1991). Political Thought in Japanese Historical Writing: From Kojiki (712) to Tokushi Yoron (1712), p.104.
  3. ^ Takekoshi, Yosaburō. (2004). The Economic Aspects of the History of the Civilization of Japan, Volume 1, p. 186.
  4. ^ Bornoff, Nicholas. (2005). National Geographic Traveler Japan, p. 193.
  5. ^ Holton, Daniel Clarence. (1922). The Political Philosophy of Modern Shintō, a Study of the State Religion of Japan, p. 273.
  6. ^ Ponsonby-Fane, Richard. (1959). The Imperial House of Japan, p. 124.
  7. ^ Institute for Japanese Culture and Classics, Kokugakuin University: Glossary of Shinto Names and Terms, Kampei Taisha.
  8. ^ Ponsonby-Fane. Imperial, p. 125.
  9. ^ Ponsonby-Fane, Richard. (1963). The Vicissitudes of Shinto, p. 394.

References[edit]

  • Bornoff, Niholas. (2005). National Geographic Traveler Japan. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society.
  • Brownlee, John S. (1991). Political Thought in Japanese Historical Writing: From Kojiki (712) to Tokushi Yoron (1712). Waterloo, Ontario: Wilfrid Laurier University Press. ISBN 0-88920-997-9
  • Holton, Daniel Clarence. (1922). The Political Philosophy of Modern Shintō, a Study of the State Religion of Japan. Chicago: University of Chicago Libraries. OCLC 2857479
  • Ponsonby-Fane, Richard Arthur Brabazon. (1959). The Imperial House of Japan. Kyoto: Ponsonby Memorial Society. OCLC 194887
  • _______________. (1962). Studies in Shinto and Shrines. Kyoto: Ponsonby Memorial Society. OCLC 399449
  • _______________. (1963). The Vicissitudes of Shinto. Kyoto: Ponsonby Memorial Society. OCLC 186605327
  • Takekoshi, Yosaburō. (2004). The Economic Aspects of the History of the Civilization of Japan, Volume 1. London: Taylor & Francis. ISBN 978-0-415-32379-6