Mladen Ivanić

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Mladen Ivanić
Mladen Ivanic.jpg
28th and 31st Chairman of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina
In office
17 November 2016 – 17 July 2017
Prime MinisterDenis Zvizdić
Preceded byBakir Izetbegović
Succeeded byDragan Čović
In office
17 November 2014 – 17 July 2015
Prime MinisterVjekoslav Bevanda
Denis Zvizdić
Preceded byBakir Izetbegović
Succeeded byDragan Čović
9th Serb Member of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina
In office
17 November 2014 – 20 November 2018
Preceded byNebojša Radmanović
Succeeded byMilorad Dodik
Speaker of the House of Peoples
In office
14 July 2008 – 26 February 2009
Preceded bySulejman Tihić
Succeeded byDušanka Majkić
Minister of Foreign Affairs
In office
13 January 2003 – 9 February 2007
Prime MinisterAdnan Terzić
Preceded byZlatko Lagumdžija
Succeeded bySven Alkalaj
11th Prime Minister of Republika Srpska
In office
16 January 2001 – 17 January 2003
PresidentMirko Šarović
Dragan Čavić
Preceded byMilorad Dodik
Succeeded byDragan Mikerević
Personal details
Born (1958-09-16) 16 September 1958 (age 60)
Sanski Most, FPR Yugoslavia
Political partyParty of Democratic Progress
Spouse(s)Gordana Ivanić[1]
Alma materUniversity of Banja Luka
University of Belgrade

Mladen Ivanić (Serbian Cyrillic: Младен Иванић, pronounced [mlâden ǐʋanit͡ɕ]; born 16 September 1958)[2] is a Bosnian Serb politician who has been a member of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina since 2014 and is due to leave office in 2018 after losing his bid for re-election.

Born in Sanski Most, Ivanić has lived in Banja Luka since 1971, when he earned his university diploma in economics there. He then received a doctorate in Belgrade; the thesis was titled Contemporary Marxist political economy in the West. He undertook post-Doctoral studies at the University of Mannheim and the University of Glasgow. Upon completion of his studies, he worked as a journalist. From 1985 to 1988, he lectured in Political Economy at the Faculty of Economics in Banja Luka, and later also in Sarajevo and Glasgow. His political career began in 1988, when he became a member of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina during Yugoslav Socialist times.[citation needed]

From 2001-03, Ivanić was Prime Minister of Republika Srpska (RS), one of Bosnia and Herzegovina's two entities. He also served as the sixth foreign minister of Bosnia and Herzegovina since it became independent in 1992, succeeding Zlatko Lagumdžija on the post, and as such was a member of the Council of Ministers of Bosnia and Herzegovina. In turn, he was succeeded on the post in 2007 by Sven Alkalaj.[citation needed]

He is a founding member of the center-right Bosnian Serb Party of Democratic Progress (PDP) and was its President from 1999 to 2015. In October 2014, he was elected as the Serb member of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina, narrowly beating SNSD's candidate, the RS PM Željka Cvijanović. His victory marked the first time since the Dayton Agreement that the Serb member of the Presidency received the highest number of votes in the country, out of the three elected members. He was chairman of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina (head of state) from 17 November 2014 until 17 July 2015.[citation needed]

Ivanić is fluent in English.[3]

On October 7, 2018, Ivanić lost his bid for re-election to the Bosnian Presidency to Bosnian Serb politician Milorad Dodik.[4][5]

References[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Milorad Dodik
Prime Minister of Republika Srpska
2001–2003
Succeeded by
Dragan Mikerević
Preceded by
Zlatko Lagumdžija
Minister of Foreign Affairs
2003–2007
Succeeded by
Sven Alkalaj
Preceded by
Sulejman Tihić
Speaker of the House of Peoples
2008–2009
Succeeded by
Dušanka Majkić
Preceded by
Nebojša Radmanović
Serb Member of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina
2014–2018
Succeeded by
Milorad Dodik
Preceded by
Bakir Izetbegović
Chairman of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina
2014–2015
Succeeded by
Dragan Čović
Chairman of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina
2016–2017