Neotherapsida

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Neotherapsida
Temporal range: Middle PermianHolocene, 270–0 Ma (range includes mammals)
Non-mammalian synapsids died out 17.5 million years ago
Oligokyphus BW.jpg
Oligokyphus
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Order: Therapsida
Clade: Eutherapsida
Clade: Neotherapsida
Hopson, 1999
Subgroups

The Neotherapsida are a clade of therapsids. The clade includes anomodonts and the more derived theriodonts, which include mammals.

Distribution[edit]

Permian[edit]

In the Permian geological period, Neotherapsida lived in Germany, India, Madagascar, Niger, South Africa, Tanzania, United Kingdom, United States in Texas, and Zambia.[3]

Severodvinian[edit]

In the Severodvinian age of the Tatarian stage of the Permian time period, Neotherapsida lived in Russia.[3][4]

Triassic[edit]

In the Triassic, Neotherapsida lived in Antarctica, Argentina, Brazil, China, Germany, Lesotho, Morocco, Poland, Russia, South Africa, Tanzania, and United States in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, North Carolina, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming.[3]

Jurassic[edit]

In the Jurassic time period, basal Neotherapsida lived in Lesotho.[3]

Cretaceous[edit]

In the Cretaceous period, basal Neotherapsida lived in Australia and Russia.

Classification[edit]

The Neotherapsida were named and classified as a subgroup of the clade Eutherapsida by James Allen Hopson in 1999.[3][5]

Relatives[edit]

Taxonomy[edit]

Anomodontia[edit]

Anomocephalus, a primitive anomodont that retained a full set of teeth
Aulacocephalodon, a dicynodont, an herbivore with two tusks
Kannemeyeria, a dicynodont, was one of the first large herbivores of the Triassic.

Groups of Theriodontia[edit]

Mammalians, like humans and horses, evolved from theriodonts.


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Paleobiology Database: Anomodontia
  2. ^ The Paleobiology Database: Theriodontia
  3. ^ a b c d e The Paleobiology Database: Neotherapsida
  4. ^ Palæos Archived 2010-01-04 at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ J.A. Hopson. 1999. "Therapsids". Encyclopedia of Paleontology 2: 1256-1266